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Psilocybin (Psychedelic) Therapy at Johns Hopkins University
 
03:06
From Science & Sacraments, a documentary made for the Purdue University Psychoactive Substances Research Collection. Find more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/PsychedelicSeries www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/02/09/trip-treatment
Просмотров: 11688 Our Amazing World
Terence Mckenna's Final Reflection on the Self
 
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This is the ending of Transcendental Object at the End of Time Watch the full Terence McKenna movie by We Plants Are Happy Plants! https://youtu.be/aAlaRdrcQcY Support this movie: Buy or stream my music http://songsabouttheunspeakable.com http://facebook.com/wpahp iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/album/songs-about-the-unspeakable/id815711383 Stream the soundtrack on Spotify: https://play.spotify.com/user/wpahp/playlist/1fL1lEsza9ISRlj5PV6cXM?play=true&utm_source=open.spotify.com&utm_medium=open Or just like, comment, share! Thanks for watching - Peter Bergmann/We Plants Are Happy Plants Terence McKenna on Facebook http://facebook.com/LanguageEvolution We are Our Amazing World www.ouramazingworld.org www.twitter.com/OAWoww By 2050, half of the United States population will be from a racial or ethnic minority group. As ethnocultural diversity grows by census and by mindset, political leaders must consider a broad spectrum of attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors when it comes to mental health, spirituality, and individual well-being. We are healthcare professionals who support: 1. Culturally competent mental healthcare reform (mental illness, addiction, psychosomatic disorders) that expands research and treatment approaches for an increasingly diverse American population. 2. Cultural and spiritual awareness in healthcare. 3. Drug policy reform that focuses on prevention, support, and addiction treatment rather policies supporting domestic mass incarceration and proliferation of arms around the world. Professional, cultural, and ideological boundaries must be acknowledged, then dissolved, to create meaningful change in how our society addresses brain health. We Must Integrating Western Medicine with Traditional Spirituality From Terence McKenna's Eulogy to Leo Zeff: Sometimes when Leo would sit with people, they would come out of their reveries and want to talk with him about what they were learning and seeing. And Leo would listen for a few minutes. But he then would always say: "That's fine, that's good, now return to the music." And I think that.. I like to think that Leo has now returned to the music. And some day so shall we. And to whatever degree we follow his example life here, the passage to whatever lies beyond will be made much easier. Leo showed the way, because Leo knew the way. And I salute him for that, I say for all of us who were his tribe: Goodbye to the secret chief, goodbye to the man who saw most deeply. It's now for us to do as he would have had us do. Consciousness, Mindfulness, Income Inequality, Prison Reform, Criminal Justice Reform, Drug Policy Reform, Harm Reduction, Occupy, Veterans, Mental Health, PTSD, Depression, Anxiety, Chronic Pain, Fibromyalgia, IBS, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, CBT, William Breitbart, Psychiatry, Meaning-Centered Group Therapy, Jung, Psychology, fMRI, Neuroimaging, ADHD, Stress, Society, Humanity, Transcendence.
Просмотров: 14079 Our Amazing World
Science of Ayahuasca • How Does it Work?
 
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Part of this great film: The Jungle Prescription http://www.ouramazingworld.org/science/junglerx (Dr. Gabor Maté, M.D., discusses how ayahuasca offers addicts insight into self-destructive behaviors) Gabor Maté's work as the resident doctor in Vancouver's Portland Hotel - a last-chance destination for lifelong drug abusers - has been courageous, but incredibly frustrating. Maté hears of an ancient medicine beyond his imaginings: one that could provide his patients with a solution. Ayahuasca (vine of the souls) is hallucinogenic tea that unlocks emotional memory; causing life-changing catharsis in those who drink it. The reported success rates for curing addicts at Dr. Mabit's detox centre are quadruple the average in Western society. Dr Maté returns to Canada with a plan to work with a group of healers to treat patients struggling with various types of addiction. Since the publication of his award-winning book, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, Dr. Gabor Mate has been one of Canada's leading thinkers on addiction and its deeper causes. The experience of making the film has had a profound impact on him: "As a physician all too aware of the limitations and narrowness of Western medicine, I have learned much from working with this plant. The plant, and the experience with the plant, is no panacea. There are no panaceas. But as an opening to human possibility, even in the face of lifelong trauma and desperation, it offers much. Seeing people open to themselves, even temporarily, has been a teaching and an inspiration." Learn more at http://www.ouramazingworld.org/. We are healthcare professionals who support mental health, well-being, psych research, smart drug policy, anthropology, and humanity. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/OAWoww https://twitter.com/OAWoww • Why Is Psychedelics Research Important? There is a vast lack of knowledge about our brain despite the technology we possess. With billions of dollars going toward the 'BRAIN Initiative,' 'Human Connectome Project,' 'Human Brain Project,' now is the time to expand research on psychedelics and consciousness research. Consciousness determines personality. It determines how we view ourselves, others, and the world. "Psychedelic drugs can unlock mysteries of brain – former government adviser" http://bit.ly/1P4FuVC Lack of psychotherapists is a major issue in the United States. Most Americans, especially rural and underserved populations, don't have access to adequate mental health and addiction services that include psychotherapy. http://bit.ly/1OHfwY8 Several small but well-conducted psychedelic psychotherapy studies demonstrate the potential of classic hallucinogens to treat mental disorders and addiction. Classic hallucinogens could potentially enhance psychotherapy and reducing the number of sessions that are needed, but their research is hindered because of stigma and inappropriate Schedule I classification by the DEA. Schedule I is reserved for the most addictive and dangerous of drugs. Research and history have proven that classic hallucinogens carry very little risk of harm or addiction. Studies show that psychedelic-psychotherapy helps with end-of-life and dying, an aspect of life that our society does not handle well. MPRnews: http://bit.ly/1yX3nw8 IOM Dying in America: http://bit.ly/1p1AGDQ Why are fibromyalgia, chronic pain, and ADHD are so common in our America but not other countries? PsychologyToday: Why French Kids Don't Have ADHD http://bit.ly/17mcE3Y Excellent read from The New Yorker magazine... "The Trip Treatment: Research into psychedelics, shut down for decades, is now yielding exciting results." http://nyr.kr/1BTHPOX Psychedelic Drugs ‘Safe as Riding a Bike or Playing Soccer’ http://bit.ly/1aFeSOi Drugs legislation is hampering clinical research, warns David Nutt http://bit.ly/1bS1ze2 Professor David Nutt and science's Galileo complex http://bit.ly/1QH5ASn Scientific American: Do Psychedelics Expand the Mind by Reducing Brain Activity? http://bit.ly/1JQQfcx Recent fMRI neuroimaging studies show that psychedelics have similar effects on the brain as mindfulness meditation https://youtu.be/FG1gZ-agjvY This site is easy to read and has links to all the recent studies: http://ptsdmindfulnesspsilocybin.blogspot.com/ Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC) http://1.usa.gov/1DUJJNf "All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; The point is to discover them." -Galileo
Просмотров: 13869 Our Amazing World
Can Magic Mushrooms Unlock Depression? Psilocybin | Rosalind Watts | TEDxOxford
 
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Clinical psychologist Rosalind Watts from Imperial College describes how Magic Mushrooms (Psilocybin), when used in a therapeutic setting, have been found to be a very effective treatment for depression. In this talk she draws on her experiences as working as a therapist on the groundbreaking Psilocybin for Depression study, and introduces us to some of the patients and their stories of transformation. Dr Rosalind Watts completed her clinical psychology training at University College London. After six years of practicing psychotherapy in the NHS, she joined a clinical trial at Imperial College, investigating psilocybin (magic mushrooms) as a treatment for depression. Her research explores patients' positive views of this intriguing therapy. For more information about research on psilocybin and related compounds, please visit: The Beckley Foundation: http://beckleyfoundation.org/ Heffter Research Institute: http://heffter.org/ Compass Pathways: https://compasspathways.com/ Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies: http://www.maps.org/ Our Amazing World: http://www.ouramazingworld.org/hallucinogen-studies.html This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx TEDxOxford website http://tedxoxford.co.uk/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/tedxoxford
Просмотров: 21744 Our Amazing World
Mister Rogers' Message for Mental Health
 
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"You've made this day a special day by just you being you. There's no person in the world like you, and I like you just the way you are." "One of the greatest gifts you can give anybody is the gift of your honest self." Fred Rogers was red–green color blind, swam every morning, and neither smoked nor drank. He was a vegetarian on ethical grounds, stating "I don't want to eat anything that has a mother." His office at WQED Pittsburgh famously did not have a desk, only a sofa and armchairs, because Rogers thought a desk was "too much of a barrier." https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Fred_Rogers "Mister Rogers went onstage to accept the award—and there, in front of all the soap opera stars and talk show sinceratrons, in front of all the jutting man-tanned jaws and jutting saltwater bosoms, he made his small bow and said into the microphone, "All of us have special ones who have loved us into being. Would you just take, along with me, ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you become who you are. Ten seconds of silence." And then he lifted his wrist, looked at the audience, looked at his watch, and said, "I'll watch the time." There was, at first, a small whoop from the crowd, a giddy, strangled hiccup of laughter, as people realized that he wasn't kidding, that Mister Rogers was not some convenient eunuch, but rather a man, an authority figure who actually expected them to do what he asked. And so they did. One second, two seconds, three seconds—and now the jaws clenched, and the bosoms heaved, and the mascara ran, and the tears fell upon the beglittered gathering like rain leaking down a crystal chandelier. And Mister Rogers finally looked up from his watch and said softly "May God be with you," to all his vanquished children." –Todd Junot of Esquire, 1997 Mister Rogers' Neighborhood began airing in 1968 and ran for 895 episodes; the last set of new episodes was taped in December 2000 and began airing in August 2001. At its peak, in 1985, 8% of U.S households tuned into the show. Teresa Heinz Kerry said of Rogers, "He never condescended, just invited us into his conversation. He spoke to us as the people we were, not as the people others wished we were."
Просмотров: 4353 Our Amazing World
Johns Hopkins Psilocybin Project: Psychedelics Research History & the Mystical Experience
 
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Studies: www.ouramazingworld.org/hallucinogen-studies.html www.facebook.com/ouramazingworldd Made for Purdue University Psychoactive Substances Research Collection: https://www.youtube.com/user/PsychedelicSeries Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D., is Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His principal research focus in both clinical and preclinical laboratories has been on the behavioral and subjective effects of mood-altering drugs. His research has been largely supported by grants from the National Institute on Health and he is author of over 300 journal articles and book chapters. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, and to numerous pharmaceutical companies in the development of new psychotropic drugs. He is also currently a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence for the World Health Organization. He has an interest in meditation and is the lead investigator of the psilocybin research initiative at Johns Hopkins, which includes studies of psilocybin occasioned mystical experience in healthy volunteers and cancer patients, and a pilot study of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation. Roland Griffiths. Alicia Danforth. Charles Grob. Matthew Johnson. Albert Garcia-Romeu. Tony Bossis. Stephen Ross. David Nichols. www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd
Просмотров: 68118 Our Amazing World
Nature of Things: Addiction Specialist Gabor Maté Ventures Outside Western Medicine
 
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http://www.ouramazingworld.org/science/junglerx http://www.ouramazingworld.org/spirituality/david-suzukis-nature-of-things-the-jungle-prescription Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Documentary David Suzuki's Nature of Things: Jungle Prescription Jacque Mabit, Jordi Riba, Josep Marie Fabregas, fMRI, neuroimaging 2015 speaking schedule: Presentation for the Northwest Institute of Addiction Studies The Myth of Normal: Science and Compassion in Understanding Addiction & Mental Health August 11 @ 9:00 am - 3:30 pm Austin Convention Center, 500 East Cesar Chavez Street, Austin , Texas When The Body Says No: Recognizing And Preventing The Hidden Stress That Undermines Our Health The Biology of Loss and Recovery: How Stress Affects Child- and Youth Development, and How To Foster Resilience Taming the Hungry Ghost: Science and Compassion in Understanding and Treating Addiction, from Substances to Gambling Beyond The Medical Model: Illness And Health, Science And Psychedelics How Housing Helps Heal the Hungry Ghosts: Dr. Gabor Mate and Dr. Sam Tsemberis on Harm Reduction and Housing First Substance Dependence, Community and Transformation: A Biopsychosocial View of Addiction and its Healing The Hungry Ghost, Why Children are Stressed, and When the Body Says No Charleston, WV West Virginia Bi-Annual Integrated Behavioral Health Conference Ayahuasca: Transformation And A Truer Life George Ignatieff Theatre, part of The University of Trinity College in the University of Toronto Depression, Anxiety and Addictions from a New Perspective: The Myth of Normal Childhood Development & Parenting Through the Past and Future into the Present: What Psychedelics Can Teach Us Psychedelic Psychotherapy Forum 2015 at UVIC The Biology of Loss: How Early Relationships Set The Template For Child and Adult Dysfuncion David Suzuki Child Brain Development and Addiction The Damage is Done: Rita Bozi, Hungary The Biology of Loss: What Happens When Attachments are Impaired and How To Foster Resilience The Myth of Normal & In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts Beyond the Medical Model: from the Stress-Disease Connection to Psychedelic Therapy California Institute of Integral Studies
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Sting Talks About His Ayahuasca Experience
 
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Support ayahuasca and psilocybin research, rescheduling!! Here: http://www.ouramazingworld.org/hallucinogen-studies.html Shamans of the Amazon: http://www.ouramazingworld.org/life/shamans-of-the-amazon-drugs-politics-the-war-on-drugs-1999 www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd
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Robert M Pirsig NPR Interview July 12, 1974
 
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Human Despair - Dr Gabor Maté
 
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Impact of Psilocybin on Hippocampal Neurogenesis & Extinction of Trace Fear Conditioning
 
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Presentation by Zeno Sanchez-Ramos, MD, PhD More videos from MAPS.org https://www.youtube.com/user/mapsmdma Learn more about psychedelics, mindfulness, mental health, & addiction: www.ouramazingworld.org www.twitter.com/OAWoww www.FB.com/ouramazingworldd Study authors: • Briony J. Catlow & Daniel A. Paredes Lieber Institute for Brain Development, Baltimore, MD, USA • Shijie Song & Juan Sanchez‑Ramos James Haley VA Medical Center, Tampa, FL, & Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, 13220 Laurel Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA e-mail: jsramos@health.usf.edu • Cheryl L. Kirstein Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
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Terence Mckenna: What We Need is a Sense of Unity. Feeling is Primary  (1990 MAPS Conference)
 
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1990 MAPS Psychedelics & Spirituality Conference Surrender is the opposite side of the coin of ego. www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd "What we need is a sense of unity, not an idea of unity, not an ideology of unity, because if there ever was an ideology of unity, it was communism, and the pieces are still falling from the explosion of that system of thought. We need a feeling of unity. So it doesn't come out of intellectual exhortation. It comes out of a personal act of courage made by the individual. An act of courage which involves Surrender. Surrender is the opposite side of the coin of Ego. The central issue of our times is the inability to surrender to what we KNOW is right. We have the ability to feed the hungry, we have the ability to educate our children, to clean up our environment, to eliminate sexism, to eliminate racism. The question is: CAN WE CHANGE OUR MINDS FAST ENOUGH? The hour is late, the clock is ticking. We will be judged very harshly if we fumble the ball. We are the inheritors of millions and millions of years of successfully lived lives, and successful adaptations to changing conditions in the natural world. Now the challenge passes to us, the living, that the yet-to-be-born will have a place to put their feet, and a sky to walk under. Let's not whore ourselves to nitwit ideologies. Let's not give our control over to the east among us. Rather, claim your place in the Sun, and go forward into the light. The tools are there, the path is known, you simply have to turn your back on a culture that has gone sterile and dead, and get with the program of a living world, and a re-empowerment of the imagination" -Terence McKenna
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David Nichols at House Subcommittee Hearing on Novel Psychoactive Substances
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org Full: https://youtu.be/9b3VvOcbThI https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4597403/david-nichols-unc-eshelman-pharmacy-school
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Roland Griffiths: Psilocybin Research for Anxiety & Psychological Distress
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org FB.com/ouramazingworldd Twitter.com/OAWoww Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D., is Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His principal research focus in both clinical and preclinical laboratories has been on the behavioral and subjective effects of mood-altering drugs. His research has been largely supported by grants from the National Institute on Health and he is author of over 300 journal articles and book chapters. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, and to numerous pharmaceutical companies in the development of new psychotropic drugs. He is also currently a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence for the World Health Organization. He has an interest in meditation and is the lead investigator of the psilocybin research initiative at Johns Hopkins, which includes studies of psilocybin occasioned mystical experience in healthy volunteers and cancer patients, and a pilot study of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation. Researchers include Roland Griffiths. Alicia Danforth. Charles Grob. Matthew Johnson. Albert Garcia-Romeu. Tony Bossis. Stephen Ross. David Nichols, Dr. Guss, Michael Bogenschutz, Peter Hendricks.
Просмотров: 2552 Our Amazing World
Abraham Maslow on Peak Experience, the Mystical Experience
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org
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Shamans of the Amazon pt 1 [Documentary] Ayahuasca ~ DMT ~ Terence McKenna cameo
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org/life/shamans-of-the-amazon-drugs-politics-the-war-on-drugs-1999 www.ouramazingworld.org www.FB.com/ouramazingworldd www.twitter.com/OAWoww Pt 1: "This is a personal account of filmmaker, Dean Jefferys, returning to the Amazon with his partner and one year old daughter. They journey deep into the heart of the Ecuadorian rainforest to meet two Amazon shamans to learn about and experience the ancient hallucinogenic ayahuasca ritual. The film brings to the viewer an intimate and fascinating look at the shamans of the Amazon, their culture and their rituals that are fast disappearing. Shamanism. Terence McKenna. Shaman. The ayahuasca ritual is thousands of years old." Website: http://www.ouramazingworld.org/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/OAWoww Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OAWoww Tsu: http://www.tsu.co/OurAmazingWorld
Просмотров: 116856 Our Amazing World
Grateful Dead Fare Thee Well Rainbow Formation Levi's Stadium Santa Clara, CA
 
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Jerry Garcia Lights the Sky Red and Sends an Amazing Double Rainbow from Heaven on the Next to Last Stop of the 50th & Final Year of Grateful Dead Shows June 27, 2015 Santa Clara, California www.ouramazingworld.org www.facebook.com/ouramazingworldd www.twitter.com/OAWoww
Просмотров: 7362 Our Amazing World
Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers (Richard Evans Schultes)
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd Richard Evans Schultes (SHULL-tees) was a biologist (January 12, 1915 – April 10, 2001) and may be considered the father of modern ethnobotany, for his studies of indigenous peoples' (especially the indigenous peoples of the Americas) uses of plants, including especially entheogenic or hallucinogenic plants (particularly in Mexico and the Amazon), for his lifelong collaborations with chemists, and for his charismatic influence as an educator at Harvard University on a number of students and colleagues who went on to write popular books and assume influential positions in museums, botanical gardens, and popular culture. His book The Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers (1979), co-authored with chemist Albert Hofmann, the discoverer of LSD, is considered his greatest popular work: it has never been out of print and was revised into an expanded second edition, based on a German translation by Christian Rätsch (1998), in 2001. Schultes's botanical fieldwork among native American communities led him to be one of the first to alert the world about destruction of the Amazon rainforest and the disappearance of its native people. He collected over 30,000 herbarium specimens (including 300 species new to science) and published numerous ethnobotanical discoveries including the source of the dart poison known as curare, now commonly employed as a muscle relaxant during surgery. He was the first to academically examine ayahuasca, a psychedelic brew made out of Banisteriopsis caapi vine in combination with various plants; of which he identified Psychotria viridis (Chacruna) and Diplopterys cabrerana (Chaliponga), both of which contained a potent short-acting hallucinogen, N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT). In his travels he lived with the indigenous peoples and viewed them with respect and felt tribal chiefs as gentlemen; he understood the languages of the Witoto and Makuna peoples. He encountered dangers in his travels, including hunger, beriberi, repeated bouts of malaria, and near drowning. Schultes became curator of Harvard's Oakes Ames Orchid Herbarium in 1953, curator of Economic Botany in 1958, and professor of biology in 1970. His ever-popular undergraduate course on economic botany was noted for his Victorian demeanor, lectures delivered in a white lab coat, insistence on memorization of systematic botanical names, films depicting native ritual use of plant inebriants, blowpipe demonstrations, and hands-on labs (using plant sources of grain, paper, caffeine, dyes, medicines, and tropical fruits). His composed and kindly persona combined with expressive eye gestures masked his exotic experiences and helped capture the imagination of the many students he inspired. In 1959, Schultes married Dorothy Crawford McNeil, an opera soprano who performed in Europe and the United States. They had three children, Richard Evans Schultes II, and twins Alexandra Ames Schultes Wilson and Neil Parker Schultes. Schultes retired from Harvard in 1985. He was a member of King's Chapel church in Boston. Despite his Germanic surname he was an anglophile. He would often vote for the Queen of England during presidential elections because he didn't support the American Revolution.
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Barry Goldwater ABC 20/20 Interview
 
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Ross Perot and Bernie Sanders Give Clinton Machine a Lesson on Greed
 
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www.OurAmazingWorld.org
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11. Michael Ruppert Confronts CIA Director John Deutch
 
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Watch the full video: https://youtu.be/IkaXLZvDbCI 1996 CIA Director town hall meeting regarding allegations that the CIA was working with the cocaine industry to bankroll Contra rebels in Nicaragua. In 1996, journalist Gary Webb unloaded a three-part series for The San Jose Mercury-News alleging that the Central Intelligence Agency helped spark America’s crack cocaine epidemic by enabling drug traffickers tied to the Nicaraguan Contras to ship into the country and use the proceeds to fund their insurgency against the Sandinista government. Published on the Mercury-News’ website, thereby making it available to all, the series, “Dark Alliance,” became one of the first viral news pieces of the Internet era. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/05/movies/kill-the-messenger-recalls-a-reporter-wrongly-disgraced.html https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Gary_Webb https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Oscar_Danilo_Blandón www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd
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Wall Street's Real Gordon Gekko: Bernie Will Help the Real Economy
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org
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Nicaraguan Sign Language - The Mind's Big Bang
 
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Nicaraguan Sign Language is a sign language largely spontaneously developed by deaf children in a number of schools in western Nicaragua in the 1970s and 1980s. It is of particular interest to the linguists who study it, because it offers a unique opportunity to study what they believe to be the birth of a new language. Before the 1970s, there was no deaf community in Nicaragua. Deaf people were largely isolated from each other and mostly used simple home sign systems and gesture ('mímicas') to communicate with their families and friends, though there were several cases of idioglossia among deaf siblings. The conditions necessary for a language to arise occurred in 1977, when a center for special education established a program initially attended by 50 deaf children. The number of students at the school (in the Managua neighborhood of San Judas) grew to 100 by 1979, the year of the Sandinista revolution. https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Nicaraguan_Sign_Language Critique on the documentary: http://www.reviewevolution.com/viewersGuide/Evolution_06.php
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Peyote: Last of The Medicine Men - Huichol People of Mexico
 
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In "Last of the Medicine Men," British adventurer Benedict Allen introduces us to the Huichol people of Mexico, where he has the rare privilege of taking part in a ritual ceremony with peyote, the classic hallucinogen-containing (mescaline) cactus, to bring him at last "face-to-face" with the gods. Watch Benedict's entire adventure to find shamans around the globe: http://www.benedictallen.com/the-last-of-the-medicine-men-dvd Ouramazingworld.org - Health profession students and expat teacher who support mental health and well-being via updates on psych drug research, anthropology, smart drug policy, & travel. Website: http://www.ouramazingworld.org/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/OAWoww Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OAWoww Tsu: http://www.tsu.co/OurAmazingWorld ----------- Peyote cactus of North America: Huichol people (Mexico) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huichol_people Native American Church (United States) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_Church A brief history of the Native American Church http://csp.org/communities/docs/fikes-nac_history.html http://peyote.org/
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Neuroscience of Glossolalia
 
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http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/06/what-happens-to-brains-during-spiritual-experiences/361882/ http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/oct06/glossolalia.htm http://www.medicaldaily.com/speaking-tongues-deemed-normal-unconnected-brain-abnormalities-244973 http://twp.duke.edu/cms/aMediaBackend/original?slug=delib2011liu&format=pdf Neuroscientific look at speaking in tongues: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/07/health/07brain.html?gwh=E73F388E8B1FA5ACF50B11785236C668&gwt=pay Study finds proximity could be key to success of healing prayer http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/14990.html
Просмотров: 3743 Our Amazing World
Psilocybin & Spirituality Roland Griffiths, PhD. Johns Hopkins Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit
 
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Watch all of the videos from Psychedemia at UPenn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cc2OYaE9YB8 Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D., is Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His principal research focus in both clinical and preclinical laboratories has been on the behavioral and subjective effects of mood-altering drugs. His research has been largely supported by grants from the National Institute on Health and he is author of over 300 journal articles and book chapters. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, and to numerous pharmaceutical companies in the development of new psychotropic drugs. He is also currently a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence for the World Health Organization. He has an interest in meditation and is the lead investigator of the psilocybin research initiative at Johns Hopkins, which includes studies of psilocybin occasioned mystical experience in healthy volunteers and cancer patients, and a pilot study of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation. www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D. is a psychopharmacologist who serves as a professor and research coordinator at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. This interview was captured during the Psychedemia conference at the University of Pennsylvania in September 2012. Here he speaks about human studies with psilocybin, the psychoactive compound found in "magic" mystical experience mushrooms. Psychopharmacology. Heffter Institute. Pharmacology. Research.
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David Nutt: 5HT-2a Receptor Stimulation by Psilocybin Benefits Mental Health
 
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Full video: https://youtu.be/eD5uBkwNsd8 In addition to decreasing activity in the mPFC, stimulating serotonin 2a receptors in the mPFC has a discrete effect on circuitry of the cingulate cortex and default mode network.
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9. Associate of Freeway Rick Ross Questions CIA Director about Oscar Danilo Blandón
 
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Watch the full video: https://youtu.be/IkaXLZvDbCI 1996 CIA Director town hall meeting regarding allegations that the CIA was working with the cocaine industry to bankroll Contra rebels in Nicaragua. In 1996, journalist Gary Webb unloaded a three-part series for The San Jose Mercury-News alleging that the Central Intelligence Agency helped spark America’s crack cocaine epidemic by enabling drug traffickers tied to the Nicaraguan Contras to ship into the country and use the proceeds to fund their insurgency against the Sandinista government. Published on the Mercury-News’ website, thereby making it available to all, the series, “Dark Alliance,” became one of the first viral news pieces of the Internet era. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/05/movies/kill-the-messenger-recalls-a-reporter-wrongly-disgraced.html https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Gary_Webb https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Oscar_Danilo_Blandón www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd
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Rise of Big Pharma: Sackler Family, Valium, OxyContin, Advertising
 
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Arthur Sackler, the older brother of the person who made OxyContin, was the person who introduced the idea of advertising directly to physicians in the 1960s. Arthur Sackler is credited with making Valium the first $100 million drug in the United States. It was the most prescribed drug between 1969 and 1982. In 1997, the FDA allowed expansion of direct-to-consumer marketing. "Childless widow" advertisement. Full: https://youtu.be/SI3EL4VEyX8
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Paul Stamets - Psilocybe and Amanita
 
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Terence McKenna: The Existential Within
 
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Ram Dass on Psychedelics and Aging. Johns Hopkins Psilocybin Research
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd Made for Purdue University Psychoactive Substances Research Collection: https://www.youtube.com/user/PsychedelicSeries Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D., is Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His principal research focus in both clinical and preclinical laboratories has been on the behavioral and subjective effects of mood-altering drugs. His research has been largely supported by grants from the National Institute on Health and he is author of over 300 journal articles and book chapters. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, interview and to numerous pharmaceutical companies in the development of new psychotropic drugs. He is also currently a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence for the World Health Organization. He has an interest in meditation and is the lead investigator of the psilocybin research initiative at Johns Hopkins, which includes studies of psilocybin occasioned mystical experience in healthy volunteers and cancer patients, and a pilot study of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation. Psychedelic medicine research: Roland Griffiths. Alicia Danforth. Charles Grob. Matthew Johnson. Albert Garcia-Romeu. Tony Bossis. Stephen Ross. David Nichols. www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd
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Obamacare - Steven Brill on Charlie Rose
 
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America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System
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Steve Jobs: When you grow up, you're told that the world is the way it is... (Don't listen to them)
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd
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96-yr old Albert Hofmann, Jonathan Ott on Consciousness & Mystical Experience [2002]
 
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From 'Hofmann's Potion' https://youtu.be/DqPgfRenX80 Albert Hofmann: "I think that the possibility to have psychedelic experience is inborn. These psychedelics - very similar compounds are in our brain; of all the compounds which you find in the plant kingdom only the psychedelics are so closely related chemically to these brain factors, which we already have. We speak about the paradise of childhood. When I had this vision and beautiful experience as a child, this is no wonder, because we have these compounds already in our brain." Myron Stolaroff: "I feel very indebted to Albert Hoffman for inventing LSD. After my first LSD-experience I claimed that this was the greatest discovery that man had ever made, because after all the human mind is the most important attribute we have, and this lets us understand our mind and the enormous potential of mind." www.ouramazingworld.org
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Richard Evans Schultes Interview (Dec 15, 1990)
 
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https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Richard_Evans_Schultes www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd Richard Evans Schultes (SHULL-tees) was a biologist (January 12, 1915 – April 10, 2001) and may be considered the father of modern ethnobotany, for his studies of indigenous peoples' (especially the indigenous peoples of the Americas) uses of plants, including especially entheogenic or hallucinogenic plants (particularly in Mexico and the Amazon), for his lifelong collaborations with chemists, and for his charismatic influence as an educator at Harvard University on a number of students and colleagues who went on to write popular books and assume influential positions in museums, botanical gardens, and popular culture. His book The Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers (1979), co-authored with chemist Albert Hofmann, the discoverer of LSD, is considered his greatest popular work: it has never been out of print and was revised into an expanded second edition, based on a German translation by Christian Rätsch (1998), in 2001. Schultes's botanical fieldwork among native American communities led him to be one of the first to alert the world about destruction of the Amazon rainforest and the disappearance of its native people. He collected over 30,000 herbarium specimens (including 300 species new to science) and published numerous ethnobotanical discoveries including the source of the dart poison known as curare, now commonly employed as a muscle relaxant during surgery. He was the first to academically examine ayahuasca, a psychedelic brew made out of Banisteriopsis caapi vine in combination with various plants; of which he identified Psychotria viridis (Chacruna) and Diplopterys cabrerana (Chaliponga), both of which contained a potent short-acting hallucinogen, N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT). In his travels he lived with the indigenous peoples and viewed them with respect and felt tribal chiefs as gentlemen; he understood the languages of the Witoto and Makuna peoples. He encountered dangers in his travels, including hunger, beriberi, repeated bouts of malaria, and near drowning. Schultes became curator of Harvard's Oakes Ames Orchid Herbarium in 1953, curator of Economic Botany in 1958, and professor of biology in 1970. His ever-popular undergraduate course on economic botany was noted for his Victorian demeanor, lectures delivered in a white lab coat, insistence on memorization of systematic botanical names, films depicting native ritual use of plant inebriants, blowpipe demonstrations, and hands-on labs (using plant sources of grain, paper, caffeine, dyes, medicines, and tropical fruits). His composed and kindly persona combined with expressive eye gestures masked his exotic experiences and helped capture the imagination of the many students he inspired. In 1959, Schultes married Dorothy Crawford McNeil, an opera soprano who performed in Europe and the United States. They had three children, Richard Evans Schultes II, and twins Alexandra Ames Schultes Wilson and Neil Parker Schultes. Schultes retired from Harvard in 1985. He was a member of King's Chapel church in Boston. Despite his Germanic surname he was an anglophile. He would often vote for the Queen of England during presidential elections because he didn't support the American Revolution.
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DEA Drug Scheduling is Arbitrary - The Controlled Substances Act (1973)
 
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"Over time, drugs shift. And a lot of this is based on lobbies. " -Anesthesiology and pain management specialist Ramana Naidu, M.D. https://www.ucsfhealth.org/ramana.naidu https://youtu.be/trSgm6PSYa0 Full: https://youtu.be/SI3EL4VEyX8 (The Prescription Opioid Epidemic: Crisis And Opportunity). "And then let's take the Schedule IV benzodiazepines. Low abuse potential? As a pain physician, I can tell you absolutely not." Full: https://youtu.be/SI3EL4VEyX8
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NA, DA, 5HT, Something Isn't Right: The Crippling Disease of Depression
 
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Robert Sapolsky, neuroendocrinologist, anthropologist, & professor of biology, neuroscience, and neurosurgery at Stanford University. www.ouramazingworld.org FB.com/ouramazingworldd www.twitter.com/OAWoww RobertSapolskyRocks.com: http://www.robertsapolskyrocks.com/depression.html Abbrevi Sapolsky opens by offering an unusual viewpoint - when it comes to human diseases, there are few disease out there that are bad as depression. It is crippling. It is pervasive. It wipes out any capacity for joy, hope or pleasure. This is not depression. Depression destroys perspective, undermines relationships, steals joy. Depression isn't a disease that you are grateful for having. It doesn't open doors; it closes them. (Here one should pause and set aside questions of mortality for a moment.) Symptoms Anhedonia - the absence of pleasure. This is where nothing brings joy or pleasure. Not good fortune, not a promotion, not an achievement. Grief - sorrow. Loss. Hopelessness. Obsessing over actions that went wrong. Delusional thinking. Guilt - blaming yourself for failures both perceived and real. Blaming yourself for blaming yourself. Blaming yourself for feeling sad and unable to do what you should be doing. Self-injury - injuring oneself, be it cutting, suicide, or some other form of self-inflicted pain. Suicide is one of the top causes of death in teenagers. Psychomotor retardation - everything is exhausting to do, to think, to move. Getting going is unbelievably hard. As a side note he points out that the probability of suicide goes up when... Vegetative symptoms - here he again stresses that this is a real disease with biological underpinnings. Sleep changes - often wake up early. Remain in stress response during sleep. The sleep cycles are totally screwed up. This is not get over it. This is biology. Loss of appetite is common. Activation of stress response. Now on to the chemistry of it. Neurons communicate with chemical messengers, neurotransmitters. Norepinephrine - MAO inhibiters. In the late 1960's the tricyclics emerged. SSRI drugs created in 1980s. Prozac, increase serotonin signalling/block reuptake of serotonin from the synapse. The current thinking is this: Dopamine - Anhedonia. Norepinephrine - Serotonin - The remaining symptoms result from the toxic mixture of combined deficits among these three key neurotransmitters. Substance p is another neurotransmitter that tells us about the biological nature of depression. So what about neuroanatomy? The triune brain theory. Glucocorticoids. Have 4+ major depressions, and the cycle can just go on its own (remember the pathways). In Cushing's, a boatload of these glucocorticoids are secreted. Common side effect of Cushing's? Depression. immunosuppressant drugs? Depression. Freud, mourning and melancholia. In mourning we bounce back, in melancholia we don't. Depression is aggression turned inward. And that gets internalized and fires up the pathway. So what else is going on? What impacts the weight of the stressor? Outlets for the stress - do you have a support system? Control - do you feel like you can control it? Predictability - do you have a sense of control and timing? Lose a parent (to death) when you're under 10 and your risk skyrockets. Depression has some degree of heritability (genetic). 50% identical twins, 25% full sibling. So the wrap-up. Depression is a real disease. What it's not is a fake disease suffered by lazy whiners. Or at least it isn't that anymore than diabetes is. Or than congestive heart failure. Or cancer. Why does this matter? Because in the world of psychiatric disorders talking about it is always taboo. People either view it as hyperbole and whining or shun it and don't want the subject to see the light of day. Sapolsky's point again and again is that depression is real and normal, the same way that diabetes is real and normal. It simply happens and doesn't reflect on the person anymore than juvenile diabetes does.
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Bernie Sanders' Foresight About the Middle East
 
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http://www.ouramazingworld.org/life/riskysaudibusiness U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is the only candidate we can trust to make prudent decisions as Commander-in-Chief of the military, right in-line with veteran Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard...
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CNN: LSD Popularity in the Tech Industry (2015)
 
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www.ouramazingworld.org Twitter.com/OAWoww FB.com/ouramazingworldd http://money.cnn.com/2015/01/25/technology/lsd-psychedelics-silicon-valley/ "So, I don't think there is such a thing as recreational LSD use," veteran Silicon Valley engineer Kevin Herbert said wryly. "I would be at a Grateful Dead show, high on LSD ... and something about my work would just come to me." Herbert, who works at Cisco, has been in the tech sphere for decades. For him, geek-dom and psychedelics have intersected since the start of his adult life: The first LSD he took was created in an M.I.T. lab at and consumed at a science fiction convention. In Silicon Valley, there is a premium on creativity, and tools thought to induce or enhance it are avidly sought. Some view psychedelics as a weapon in the arsenal, a way to approach problems differently. There's no definitive scientific evidence that LSD or other hallucinogens improve creativity, and the DEA classifies LSD as a highly addictive, Schedule I drug. But the belief that they might work as a creative tool is enough to fuel some technologists' hope for professional epiphanies. For people like Herbert, 51, Silicon Valley today feels a bit like the '70s all over again. Herbert drops acid three or four times a year and finds that it helps him solve work problems -- it's a way to "hack" the limits of his natural thought. "There was a case where I had been working on a problem for over a month," Herbert said. "And I took LSD and I just realized, 'Wait, the problem is in the hardware. It's not a software issue at all.'" Many of Herbert's colleagues are younger, and he says rising stars in the industry often share anecdotes from weekend LSD trips. CNNMoney encountered many engineers and developers who were uncomfortable sharing their habits on the record but use psychedelics both to enhance their work and as their recreational drug of choice. Tim Ferriss, a Silicon Valley investor and author of "The 4-Hour Workweek," says he knows many successful entrepreneurs who dabble in psychedelics. "The billionaires I know, almost without exception, use hallucinogens on a regular basis," Ferriss said. "[They're] trying to be very disruptive and look at the problems in the world ... and ask completely new questions." An employee of one of the biggest Silicon Valley companies said he recently made a pivotal career decision while under the influence of magic mushrooms -- changing course from a management track and moving into product security. "I have a habit of boxing up difficult thoughts and emotions I'm having, and I find psychedelics good for unpacking that stuff," he said. The phenomenon was satirized on HBO's Silicon Valley when psychedelic mushrooms guide one of the show's main characters in the hunt for a new name for their startup. However, by all accounts, psychedelics are not treated as a simple fix-it for work conundrums. The last thing he would do, Herbert says, is take LSD and then code. It's more subtle: "if you have issues in your life or anything, you're going to think about them [while high], and think about them in a different perspective." A recent study at Imperial College London provides a possible explanation as to why that happens. Twenty participants ingested LSD and then had their brain activity monitored in an fMRI machine. The drug broke down certain brain networks, allowing new patterns of communication to form. "Psychedelics dismantle 'well-worn' networks, and this allows novel communication patterns to occur ... modules that don't usually talk to each other are talking to each other more," explained Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris, the researcher who conducted the study. Psychedelics have a long history in Silicon Valley. Daniel Kottke, a college friend and early employee of Steve Jobs', used to drop acid with him at Reed College. "He was very forthcoming about that, about psychedelics being very helpful for getting him in touch with creativity," Kottke said of Jobs. According to Kottke, Jobs was not interested in smoking marijuana during college because it didn't expand consciousness in the same way. Meanwhile, in the late '90s, a former high level employee of a major software company (who asked not to be named) said he was taking psychedelics with the "specific intent of working on software problems." On one highly successful trip, he came up with design ideas, features and architectural improvements to a piece of software today used by millions. Of course, people still like to trip for fun. Technologists flock to the annual Burning Man gathering in the Nevada desert, and many attendees say it's an experience best enjoyed on psychedelics -- no professional quandaries required.
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