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Видео добавленное пользователем “UFHealth” за 2010
University of Florida Medical School Graduation Ceremony 2010
 
02:17
Just as 49 classes did before them, the 130 members of the UF College of Medicine class of 2010 received their degrees and took the Hippocratic Oath as new medical doctors in the colleges 50th commencement ceremony held Saturday, May 22. This years milestone graduation overflowed with emotion and enthusiasm as six members from the colleges first class led the procession into the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts and sat onstage to help celebrate the colleges 50th graduating class.
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University of Florida Emergency Medicine Tour Of Emergency Department
 
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Medical students can get a behind the scenes look at the University of Florida's emergency medicine program.
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UF researchers find cancer-fighting properties in papaya tea
 
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GAINESVILLE, FL. — The humble papaya is gaining credibility in Western medicine for anticancer powers that folk cultures have recognized for generations. University of Florida researcher Nam Dang, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Japan have documented papayas dramatic anticancer effect against a broad range of lab-grown tumors, including cancers of the cervix, breast, liver, lung and pancreas. The researchers used an extract made from dried papaya leaves, and the anticancer effects were stronger when cells received larger doses of the tea.
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Cooling blanket helping to save babies from brain damage.
 
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Kalipay Acevedo wasn't due to have her baby for another month, when one sleepy Sunday morning recently she felt her stomach drop. No pain. No contractions. She was just gushing blood. Her husband, Miguel, called the ambulance to their Tampa home. Kalipay passed out on the way to the hospital. She had had a placental abruption, a condition in which the placenta detaches prematurely from the uterus. The resulting loss of oxygen and glucose to the baby's brain caused a condition called hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Doctors quickly delivered baby Sianna Marie Acevedo by Caesarean section. But she wasn't breathing. In fact, she didn't breathe for about 14 minutes. Her little heart pumped at just 30 beats a minute — much slower than the 100 to 160 beats a minute considered normal for newborns. She was pale and wasn't moving. "I broke down. I thought I had lost my child," Miguel Acevedo says. Within the hour, Sianna was on her way by helicopter to Shands at UF. There, neonatologist Michael Weiss, M.D., and his team in the neonatal intensive care unit have been using a body cooling technique to try to stave off damage to the brains of babies like Sianna. Weiss and his team started quickly to carry out the procedure, called systemic hypothermia. They placed the baby on a pad attached to a temperature control machine, cooling her body to about 7 degrees Fahrenheit lower than normal body temperature for 72 hours. EEG electrodes attached to her head allowed monitoring of her brain activity patterns that could give clues about how she will fare after the treatment. A cerebral saturation monitor, connected to the lead on the baby's forehead, gave Weiss an idea of blood flow to the brain. UF is one of the few institutions to use this monitor and one of the few in the state to offer the cooling procedure.
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University of Florida Medical School Match Day
 
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Medical Students from the University of Florida find out where they will be doing their residency training.
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Compound discovered in Florida Keys shows early promise as colon cancer treatment
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A chemical compound made from a type of bacteria discovered in the Florida Keys by a University of Florida pharmacy researcher has shown effectiveness in fighting colon cancer in preclinical experiments. Writing online in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, scientists say the compound — known as largazole because it was first found near Key Largo — inhibits human cancer cell growth in cultures and rodent models by attacking a class of enzymes involved in the packaging and structure of DNA. More study is needed, but scientists hope that the discovery will lead to new treatments for the roughly 50,000 people struck with colorectal cancer each year in the United States. Researchers are enthusiastic because in addition to having the marine bacteria as a natural source of the chemical, they have been able to synthetically produce the active chemical compound extracted from the bacteria. "It is challenging to develop natural marine products into drug therapies due to what is termed the 'the supply problem,'" said Hendrik Luesch, Ph.D., an associate professor of medicinal chemistry in the UF College of Pharmacy. "We have solved the supply problem for largazole because it has a relatively simple structure, which has made it easy to reproduce in the lab." The Luesch lab discovered largazole while investigating samples of bacteria from the Florida Keys, publishing the finding in 2008. Known as cyanobacteria, the microbes have evolved to fend off predators or cope with harsh conditions in a marine environment, employing toxins to aid their own survival. The toxins are the compounds chemists such as Luesch wish to isolate and understand in a quest to create drugs that similarly fend off invading cancers in the body. Since the discovery, Luesch's lab determined the compound inhibits enzymes known as histone deacetylases, or HDACs, which are linked to many diseases and are increasingly viewed as promising for cancer therapy. Jiyong Hong, Ph.D., an assistant professor of chemistry at Duke University, teamed with the UF researchers to chemically reproduce the compound for further preclinical testing, which indicates it is a potent inhibitor of cancer cells that has the right properties to reach its intended target without the toxic side effects of many cancer drugs. "Knowing HDAC is the target that makes largazole effective means we can predict good drug properties because there are already two anticancer products on the market that work this way," said Luesch, who is a member of the UF Shands Cancer Center. Three important aspects make this marine compound more promising than other natural products as an effective cancer-fighting drug, Luesch said — availability of supply, knowing its mode of action and the fact that its cellular target is already a proven anticancer target known to result in the necessary selectivity for cancer cells over normal cells. Luesch presented the findings Sept. 9 at the Marine Drug Discovery Symposium in Pohang, South Korea, and is scheduled in mid-October to present data at the Marine Natural Products Symposium in Phuket, Thailand. The research will be featured on the cover of November's Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. He completed his initial preclinical studies that demonstrated largazole's effectiveness in inhibiting the growth of more than one type of colon cancer cell through the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding from the National Cancer Institute.
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Tongue-Tied: Helping Babies Breastfeed
 
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Doctors advise new mothers to breastfeed for at least the first six months of a baby's life, but a simple yet often untreated problem can sabotage their efforts, University of Florida researchers say. Called a tongue tie, the problem occurs when the connective tissue under the tongue is too tight. A tongue tie can hinder some newborns from being able to breastfeed properly and painlessly, and this struggle can lead many new mothers to give up breastfeeding. A simple snip can fix the problem, but many doctors still do not perform the procedure despite the effects a tongue tie can have on breastfeeding, writes UF neonatologist Dr. Sandra Sullivan in an article published online this month in the journal Pediatrics.
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UF-developed device may reduce swallowing health risk in patients with Parkinson's disease
 
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A hand-held device that strengthens the muscles involved in swallowing can address a serious symptom of Parkinson's disease, according to a new University of Florida study. In what researchers believe is the largest randomized trial of a behavioral swallowing treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease, scientists found that about one-third of the volunteers who used the device improved their ability to swallow. The findings appear in the Nov. 23 issue of the journal Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Nearly 1 million Americans have Parkinson's disease, according to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation. Finding solutions to their swallowing problems is important because their most common cause of death is pneumonia caused by inhaling foreign material, such as food, during swallowing. "The many muscles involved in swallowing progressively weaken in patients with Parkinson's disease and become uncoordinated in the same way that patients lose coordination and strength in their arms and legs," said Michelle Troche, Ph.D., the study's lead investigator and a clinical lecturer and speech pathologist in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions' department of speech, language and hearing sciences. It also becomes more difficult for patients to sense material in their airways and cough hard enough to expel it, she said.
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Pygmy Whale Arrives At The University Of Florida
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- University of Florida veterinarians are trying to find out why a pygmy sperm whale beached itself. The 12-foot-long whale washed up Wednesday night on Fernandina Beach. Beachgoers tried to push the marine mammal back into the water. When state wildlife officers arrived, they loaded the whale into a truck for transport to the Jacksonville Zoo. The whale died en route and was brought to the university instead. A necropsy will determine the cause of death. UF veterinarian Michael Walsh says the beaching of whales is relatively common and usually indicates that the animals had health problems. Walsh says pygmy sperm whales live in deep offshore waters and are difficult to raise in captivity.
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Doctor's Day and Physician Showcase at Shands at the University of Florida
 
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Featuring Dr. William Donnelly; Dr. Ronald Shorr; Dr. Michael Mahla; Dr. Everett Petersen; Dr. Stephen Hsu; D.r Li-Ming Su; Dr. William Slayton; Rathika Nimalendran, pre-med.
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Dr. Barry Byrne is no stranger to Extraordinary Measures' when it comes to Pompe disease
 
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Dr. Barry Byrne, a pediatric cardiologist and highly accomplished geneticist at the UF College of Medicine, leaves today for New York but not for an academic Dr. Barry Byrne and movie producer Michael Shamberg on the set of "Extraordinary Measures." seminar or to present a research paper. He will be attending the premier of a major motion picture and walking the red carpet with Hollywood stars, such as Harrison Ford and Brendan Fraser.
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Flat emotions misleading in Alzheimer's patients
 
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Watching a loved one struggle with Alzheimer's disease can be a painful process, but for the patient, the experience may be a muted one. Alzheimer's patients can appear withdrawn and apathetic, symptoms often attributed to memory problems or difficulty finding the words to communicate. A new University of Florida study found that they may also have a decreased ability to experience emotions; that is, they do not feel emotions as deeply as their healthy peers. This finding in a small group of patients may be useful for doctors assessing whether Alzheimer's patients are clinically depressed. The study, published online in the spring issue of the Journal of Neuropsychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, suggests that when Alzheimer's patients are asked to place an emotional value on pictures, they measure the pleasant images as less pleasant and the negative scenes as less negative compared with a control group of normal elderly people. This emotional flatness could be incorrectly interpreted as a symptom of depression. "We found that the Alzheimer's patients as a rule tend to go more toward the middle," said Dr. Kenneth Heilman, senior author of the paper and a professor of neurology at the College of Medicine and UF's McKnight Brain Institute. "They don't feel as positive toward the positive pictures or as negative toward the negative ones. They're not depressed, but their emotional experience appears to be flattened."
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UF Health News: Mystery diagnosis: Discovery helps detect diabetes
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers have identified a protein that affects how much insulin the body produces in people with a hereditary form of diabetes. Called maturity onset diabetes of the young, or MODY, the disease can be difficult to detect and is sometimes misdiagnosed as the more common type 1or type 2 forms of diabetes, in part because doctors have not been looking at the full genetic picture, said Li-Jun Yang, M.D., an associate professor of pathology, immunology and laboratory medicine in the UF College of Medicine. If the disease has not been diagnosed, children with MODY are often treated with insulin injections like type 1 diabetes patients. The problem is, they don't need to be. Instead of insulin injections — which can be dangerous if not administered precisely throughout the day — patients with the most common form of MODY can take a pill that stimulates insulin production to treat their disease. "The clinical treatment for MODY can be so simple if you diagnose the disease accurately," said Yang, the senior author of the study, which was published in April in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. "People will treat this either as type 1 or type 2, but that is not the best approach for managing this condition. That is why we think what we have discovered is so important."
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UF Alzheimer's researcher receives MetLife research grant
 
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The director of the Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases at the University of Florida received the MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease during a scientific briefing and luncheon today (Thursday, Feb. 25) in Washington, D.C. Todd Golde, M.D., a professor of neuroscience in the College of Medicine, studies amyloid beta protein, a substance believed to contribute to the accumulation of "brain plaque" in Alzheimer's patients. Golde helped explain the molecular interplay between amyloid beta protein and a class of therapeutic agents known as gamma-secretase modulators, or GSMs, now being tested in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
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NIH awards nearly $10.62 million to UF pharmacogenomics researcher
 
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A University of Florida genetics researcher has received $10.62 million to further a national effort to use genetic data to more effectively pinpoint which medications and treatments are best for individual patients. Julie A. Johnson, Pharm.D., a UF professor and chair of pharmacotherapy and translational research in the College of Pharmacy, is one of 14 researchers and seven resource development groups who have received a five-year award as part of the National Institute of Health's Pharmacogenomics Research Network. With an eye to the future of personalized medicine, the NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences has invested more than $160 million in these genetics investigators to study responses to medicines for cancer, heart disease, asthma, nicotine addiction and several new areas added this summer.
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Antibacterial agent could cause pregnancy problems
 
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A chemical found in everything from antibacterial soaps and lotions to socks and toothpaste may disrupt an enzyme that plays an important role in pregnancy, University of Florida researchers say. Thought to be harmless, triclosan gives many soaps and lotions their antibacterial oomph and is found in hundreds of popular products. But a team of UF researchers led by Margaret O. James, Ph.D., has discovered that the chemical hinders an enzyme linked to the metabolism of estrogen. The researchers' findings are reported in the November print issue of the journal Environment International.
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UF College of Dentistry Department of Pediatric Surgery
 
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Dedication ceremony for the Dr. Robert E. Primosch Clinical Education Center
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University of Florida White Coat Ceremony
 
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Medical students at the University of Florida transition from the classroom to the clinics by receiving their white coats in a special ceremony.
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A new model provides window into how vertebrates repair themselves
 
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For more than four centuries, scientists have studied the amazing regenerative power of salamanders, trying to understand how these creatures routinely repair injuries that would leave humans and other mammals paralyzed... or worse. Now, an international team of researchers associated with the University of Florida's Regeneration Project has begun creating the tools necessary to understand the body systems and genes of the Mexican axolotl [ax-o-lot-ahl] salamander. The axolotl [ax-o-lot-ahl] is the undisputed champion of vertebrate regeneration. In fact, it is the highest, most complex organism that in adulthood can still do the clever trick of completely reconstructing whole limbs and even parts of its central nervous system.
Просмотров: 25978 UFHealth
UF psychiatrist offers tips on how to avoid the stress of the holidays
 
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The most wonderful time of the year can also be the most stressful time of the year. Watch and learn how to prevent holiday stress.
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Holiday Drinking Dangers
 
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Drinking spirits around the holidays has become as much of a tradition as celebrating the holidays themselves. Find out what health care experts are saying about this spike in alcohol use.
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Coronary Artery Disease and Diabetes
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — For patients with diabetes and heart disease, less isnt always more — at least when it comes to blood pressure. New data show an increased risk of heart attack, stroke or death for patients having blood pressure deemed too high — or too low, according to Rhonda Cooper-DeHoff, Pharm.D., an associate professor of pharmacy and medicine at UF. She reported her findings today (Sunday, March 14) at the American College of Cardiologys 59th annual scientific session in Atlanta.
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Biomedical Sciences Building Dedication Ceremony at UF
 
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The University of Florida dedicated a new research facility that will stimulate the kind of cross-disciplinary interactions that often lead to such innovations. The new Biomedical Sciences Building brings together scientists from different UF colleges and disciplines to advance medical discoveries and translate them into treatments for patients. The $90.5 million, 163,000-square-foot building houses researchers from the colleges of Medicine, Engineering, and Public Health and Health Professions, creating the potential for new collaborations. Laboratories have an open design in which teams are not cut off from each other by walls.
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University of Florida medical students prepare for Match Day!
 
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Ivan DeQuesada and other medical students anticipate March 18th, Match day.
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UF strength science lab training system promises shorter, more intense workouts
 
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Exercising one hour a week and getting the same results as traditional strength training might sound unreal, but University of Florida orthopedics researchers have developed a system that they say makes it possible. It's based on a training principle that Winter Olympics gold medal winner Bode Miller has used in preparing for competition. Called NeGator, it uses eccentric — or negative — resistance training, which capitalizes on the fact that the human body can support and lower weights that are too heavy to lift.
Просмотров: 1628 UFHealth
College of Veterinary Medicine opens new state-of-the-art small animal hospital
 
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University of Florida Veterinarians have a new home to care for animals. Watch and learn why people are calling this hospital one of the best.
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Stem Cell Tricking for Leukemia Patients
 
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RESEARCHERS HAVE FOUND A WAY TO TREAT BLOOD CANCERS USING STEM CELLS FROM DONORS WHO ARE NOT PERFECT MATCHES WITH THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS, A PROCESS KNOWN AS HAPLOMATCHING.
Просмотров: 642 UFHealth
UF researcher gets $7.5 million to help patients with muscular dystrophy
 
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Duchenne muscular dystrophy research at the University of Florida got a major boost with the award of $7.5 million in National Institutes of Health funding to study the use of magnetic resonance imaging in determining the natural progression of the disease. UF scientists will assess whether MRI technology can be used as a precise, noninvasive measure of muscle tissue in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Understanding how the disease affects muscle tissue could help facilitate the testing of new therapies in clinical trials, researchers say.
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UF scientists find genetic clues about pain insensitivity
 
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A baby who rarely cries is many parents' idea of a "happy" baby. Ashlyn Blocker was that kind of baby. She never cried at birth, when she was hungry, wet or teething. But when neither a severe diaper rash nor a cut on the surface of her eye caused the tiniest complaint, her parents, Tara and John Blocker, realized it wasn't happiness that kept her quiet. Ashlyn could not feel pain in a normal way. Now, researchers at the University of Florida have pinpointed a major clue about her condition, called congenital insensitivity to pain. They identified two genetic mutations that affect how strongly pain signals are sent to the brain. "This is a gene that, depending on how it is modified, has the ability to affect pain sensitivity to a large degree," said Dr. Roland Staud, a pain expert and professor in the UF College of Medicine who led the study. The findings shed light not just on the inability to feel pain, but also, at least potentially, on cases in which people feel unbearable or chronic pain. This knowledge ultimately could guide the development of novel and effective pain therapies. The work appears in online and upcoming print editions of the European Journal of Pain.
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University Of Florida's  Emergency Medicine Program
 
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University of Florida's Emergency Medicine Residents talk about why they chose to train at UF and to live in Gainesville.
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Marine researchers rush to collect samples as oil threat grows
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — In a race against time, University of Florida marine researchers are hurrying to collect underwater marine algae samples in the Florida Keys while an ever-growing Gulf oil spill steadily migrates toward Florida, already reaching the Emerald Coast in the Panhandle. Hendrik Luesch, Ph.D., an associate professor of medicinal chemistry at the UF College of Pharmacy, took his research team to Long Key last week in hopes of advancing early drug discoveries that may yield cancer-fighting properties hidden in marine algae. It's an expedition he has made annually for four years, but this year it seems there might be a limit on how long the ecosystem will yield its specimens. According to federal and independent scientists, as much as 2.5 million gallons of oil per day are spewing from a pipe in the Gulf of Mexico that engineers have failed to seal. "Cyanobacteria, or organisms that overgrow coral reefs, are shown to produce drug-like compounds that may be exploited for biomedical purposes such as anti-cancer drugs," Luesch said. The warm waters and mild year-round temperatures allow marine life to flourish in the Keys, creating a predatory environment among these organisms, Luesch said. In order to survive, marine organisms develop defense systems, sort of like a chemical survival kit. Researchers use these toxic che
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UF researchers: Alcohol, energy drinks add up to higher intoxication levels, increased driving risk
 
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Energy drinks, favored among young people for the beverages' caffeine jolt, also play a lead role in several popular alcoholic drinks, such as Red Bull and vodka. But combining alcohol and energy drinks may create a dangerous mix, according to University of Florida research.
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Got statins? UF cardiologists recommend new use for old drug
 
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Cardiologists at the University of Florida are pointing to a new use for an old therapy. Giving patients cholesterol-lowering statins before surgery and other invasive procedures can halve the risk of heart attacks, deaths and other complications, they report in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. "The magnitude of benefit we found in terms of reducing mortality, post-procedure myocardial infarctions and reduction in atrial fibrillation after bypass surgery is really quite large," said first author David Winchester, M.D., a cardiology fellow in the College of Medicine's department of medicine. "If you look at some of the other interventions we use, such as using beta blockers before surgery, you don't get nearly the kind of benefit that we are seeing with using statins prior to procedures. That is very surprising." The results strongly support the routine use of statin therapy before invasive procedures, experts say. Statins are known for their ability to lower cholesterol. But a different mechanism is at play in reduction of postsurgery complications. Although researchers have not pinpointed the specifics, they have clues about how statins work to benefit patients after surgery. After invasive procedures such as coronary artery angioplasty, coronary bypass surgery or major vascular surgery, the risk of heart attack is raised thanks to a combination of factors. Just the act of inserting wires and catheters directly into major blood vessels can cause physical damage to those vessels or dislodge unstable plaques that then travel in the bloodstream and restrict blood flow to the very artery that cardiologists and surgeons are trying to mend.
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UF surgeons, research biologists create scale to grade shark bite severity
 
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Shark attack! These words can send waves of fear through the public and often guarantee prominent coverage in the news media — even if the bite is little more than a scratch. To better communicate the actual severity of the bite, University of Florida researchers have created a grading scale, similar to how burn severity is ranked by degrees. The new scale is detailed in this month's The American Surgeon
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University of Florida Pediatric Clinic Dedication Ceremony
 
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Dedication ceremony for the Dr. Robert E. Primosch Clinical Education Center
Просмотров: 254 UFHealth
Cutting physician payment may curb unnecessary prostate cancer therapy, lower health care costs
 
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Paying physicians less for a commonly administered prostate cancer therapy can help curb inappropriate use and save health care dollars, without having a negative impact on people who need the treatment, according to a new study in The New England Journal of Medicine. University of Florida urologist Scott Gilbert, M.D., and colleagues at the University of Michigan and the University of Texas Medical Branch evaluated national patterns of how doctors prescribed a hormone treatment called androgen deprivation therapy before and after the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services lowered the associated reimbursement rates. Among people for whom the treatment was considered necessary, there was no decline in use when payments were lowered. In contrast, use of the therapy fell more than 30 percent among patients for whom there is no medical evidence that it is beneficial.
Просмотров: 219 UFHealth
The University of Florida shines blue for diabetes
 
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It was all bubbles, bells and blue lights at the Century Tower Lighting Ceremony Nov. 12. Century Tower was done up in blue in recognition of World Diabetes Day and as part of Diabetes Awareness Month. The tower remained lit until the following Monday morning. Mark Atkinson, Ph.D., co-director of the UF Diabetes Center of Excellence and an eminent scholar for diabetes research, speaks at the Diabetes Awareness Event Nov. 12 at the HPNP building. Photo by Maria Belen-Farias Participants from the American Diabetes Association, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and the UF Diabetes Center of Excellence told their stories and commended researchers and families for their hard work in searching for a cure for the disease, which affects millions of Americans. After the speeches, the crowd of more than 60 people formed a circle at the base of the tower, and as the blue light washed over the bricks, bubbles were blown up to the top as symbols of the 284 million people living with diabetes worldwide. The event followed a research tour at the center's laboratories and a panel discussion by UF diabetes experts. These events gave participants the opportunity to hear updates on current diabetes research, tour the UF Diabetes Center laboratories and ask questions of a panel of UF investigators.
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UF Researchers Discovery May Help Body Self Heal
 
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RESEARCHERS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, THE SCRIPPS RESEARCH INSTITUTE AND HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL HAVE DISCOVERED A MOLECULE THAT MAY HELP ENHANCE OUR BODY'S NATURAL ANTIOXIDANT SELF-HEALING POWERS WITHOUT THE HELP OF VITAMINS. THIS DISCOVERY COULD POTENTIALLY HELP PEOPLE STAY HEALTHY AND DISEASE FREE.
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Harlem's Gator Nation Class Visits the University of Florida and Shands
 
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UF graduate, teacher Keith Robinson gives students a taste of college life at his alma mater, the University of Florida.
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The University of Florida Academic Health Center Receives Smoke-Free Plaques.
 
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DOCTOR STEVEN POKORNY, DIRECTOR OF HEALTH PROMOTION AT THE ALACHUA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT PRESENTS THESE SMOKE FREE PLAQUES TO LEADERS FROM SHANDS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTER. THE PLAQUES RECOGNIZE THE COMMITMENT OF UF AND SHANDS TO ESTABLISH A TOBACCO-FREE CAMPUS.
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Dr. Mark Atkinson makes a swift departure for Haiti
 
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Mark Atkinson, Ph.D. 88, professor in the department of pathology, immunology and laboratory medicine and an eminent scholar for diabetes research at the University of Florida, will leave Saturday morning for Haiti, answering a call for help from a hospital about 35 miles north of Port-au-Prince.
Просмотров: 192 UFHealth
UF research helps older adults feel more in control of their lives
 
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EXPERTS OFTEN LINK A SENSE OF BEING IN CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE TO BETTER HEALTH AND BETTER EMOTIONAL AND MENTAL WELL BEING. BUT OLDER ADULTS TEND TO LOSE THAT SENSE OF CONTROL AS THEY AGE. NOW A NEW UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDY SHOWS THAT A LITTLE TRAINING HOLDS THE KEY. RESEARCHERS SAY AS OLDER PEOPLE EXPERIENCE ILLNESS OR THE LOSS OF LOVED ONES... IT INCREASES THE SENSE THAT FORCES OUTSIDE THEM ARE CONTROLLING THEIR LIVES. RESEARCH SHOWS IMPROVING OLDER ADULTS' MEMORY, REASONING AND PROCESSING SPEED WITH TRAINING COULD HELP THEM FEEL MORE IN CONTROL OF THEIR LIVES.
Просмотров: 177 UFHealth