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Видео добавленное пользователем “UFHealth” за 2014
Scrutinizing salamanders to study scarring in humans
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The axolotl, a type of salamander, can regenerate lost limbs, regrow its own spinal cord and dodge cancer — which is why University of Florida researchers have created the tools to study how the axolotl’s blood works to heal itself, according to a study published online recently in the journal Blood. Axolotls have extraordinary regenerative properties, said Ed Scott, Ph.D., a UF Health researcher and a professor in the UF College of Medicine department of molecular genetics and microbiology. He is using axolotls to study how humans might heal without scars after surgery. “When axolotls are young and still living together in nature, it seems like their favorite snack is their siblings’ appendages,” Scott said. “They just nibble them off and they grow right back. They don’t even know they were missing.” To study blood at the site of regeneration, researchers are examining green axolotls developed to have fluorescent red blood and red axolotls developed to have green blood. The researchers can follow the contrasting blood color to the site of regeneration and pull blood cells from that site to study what kind of healing proteins are present. Axolotls also seem unable to develop cancer. In the 1940s and 1950s, papers were published examining what happened when axolotls were exposed to carcinogens, Scott said. They grew an extra arm or leg but never developed cancer. Mammals can, of course, develop cancer, and lose their ability to regenerate as they age, Scott said. “In human beings, they can do in-utero surgeries on growing babies and the babies are born without scars. When kids are very, very young, they can cut their finger back to the first knuckle and it will grow back,” Scott said. “But by the time you’re an adult, if you get down to the nail bed, that’s where regeneration stops.” In all animals, blood is responsible for repairing the body, Scott said. Red cells carry oxygen and nutrients to cells, whereas white blood cells monitor and repair damaged cells. In mammals, proteins in the blood help injuries scab and scar over very quickly, said Malcolm Maden, Ph.D., a professor in the department of biology. This is beneficial: It keeps mammals from dying from infection, Maden said. “There’s something different about the blood cell formation in axolotls,” Maden said. “They’re obviously healthy creatures living in fungus- and bacteria-infested waters. So they must have a different way of keeping the nasty things at bay while they are healing.” Usually a speckled, brown-green color, the axolotl used in research is a naturally occurring mutant with white skin. Their internal organs — and, in this case, blood — can be visible, making the study of regeneration much easier. “You can see all the green cells zooming to the site of damage, and then ask, ‘Is this a special population of blood cells that accumulate here?’” Maden said. “Thanks to having green blood in a white animal, now you can observe the blood cells taking part in the process of wound healing, then pluck them out, purify them and understand what’s going on much better than you could before.” Scott said axolotls, mice and humans all share similar cells, but the cells behave differently. “Maybe the axolotls are expressing different genes in healing in a different pattern, and that might make all the difference between scarring and regeneration,” Scott said. “In this way, we have two animals — axolotls and mice — that have very similar genes and cells, and now we can just directly compare them. It becomes one of those old Hocus Focus comics where you have to find the differences. Maybe those differences are key differences for regeneration.” Next, the researchers hope to study why diseases such as cancer don’t spread in the axolotl.
Просмотров: 5777 UFHealth
UF Audiology provides holistic approach to treatment of patients with tinnitus
 
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Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 1738 UFHealth
UF Health Trauma Center Patient Hayley Lewis
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — In June, Hayley Lewis nearly lost her life when the all-terrain vehicle she was riding crashed, causing the four-wheeler to land on top of her. UF Health ShandsCair flew Lewis, 19, from the site of the crash in Hamilton County, which sits on the Florida-Georgia border, to the Level 1 trauma center at University of Florida Health Shands Hospital. There, staff members from the UF Health Shands Trauma Center worked to save Lewis’s life and teamed with neurology and neurosurgery experts to treat her for the traumatic brain injury she suffered in the accident. “They didn’t think I would survive the helicopter ride,” says Lewis, who is now back with her family in Lake City, Florida. “I feel like I am doing super well for someone with my prognosis at the beginning.” As the UF Health Shands Trauma Center celebrates its 10th anniversary this month, her story of survival and recovery is not unique. Lewis is just one of 24,000 patients who have been treated at the center since it opened a decade ago. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 1928 UFHealth
A Diet for Patients with Crohn’s and Colitis
 
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New research is suggesting that the foods we eat can change the environment of the gut and that some dietary patterns will aid in healing the gastrointestinal inflammation that patients with Crohn’s and Colitis experience. Making these changes can be difficult, but this video shows two patients who feel the changes are worth it and that they are doable. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 9832 UFHealth
University of Florida College of Medicine Match Day 2014
 
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Students from the UF College of Medicine's class of 2014 discover's where they will spend the next four years — or more — of their medical careers. http://med.ufl.edu/
Просмотров: 10026 UFHealth
Benefits of mental exercises for seniors persist 10 years after training
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Older adults who received as few as 10 sessions of mental training show long-lasting improvements in reasoning and speed of processing skills 10 years after the intervention, according to UF Health researchers with the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly, or ACTIVE, study. The study findings appear today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. "Our prior research suggested that the benefits of the training could last up to five years, or even seven years, but no one had ever reported 10-year maintenance in mental training in older adults," said ACTIVE researcher Michael Marsiske, Ph.D., an associate professor of clinical and health psychology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions. "One of the reasons that this is surprising has to do with how little training we did with participants, about 10 to 18 sessions. This would be like going to the gym for between five and 10 weeks, never going again, and still seeing positive effects a decade later."
Просмотров: 2803 UFHealth
UF Health Shands Hospital celebrates 10 years of expert trauma care
 
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In October 2004, UF Health Shands Hospital received approval as a provisional Level 1 trauma center. Prior to this approval, Lawrence Lottenberg, M.D., who had 20 years of experience working in trauma centers, had been recruited to build the trauma center from the ground up. He oversaw efforts to not only develop guidelines and procedures but also to establish coordination among myriad specialties such as surgery, orthopedics, anesthesiology, critical care, neurosurgery and plastic surgery. By July 2005, the center received full designation as a Level 1 trauma center. During the 10 years since its inception, the UF Health Shands Trauma Center has grown to include 10 board-certified trauma surgeons and four pediatric trauma surgeons and now has nearly twice as much space, with four state-of-the-art resuscitation bays, a designated operating room and a 24-bed trauma intensive care unit. In addition, trauma patients have quick access to imaging services and the expertise of a full bevy of UF Health specialists. The trauma center is also home to a regional burn center with eight dedicated beds. “Through his tremendous work and effort, Dr. Lottenberg established a respected trauma center from which to excel,” said Frederick A. Moore, M.D., chief of acute care surgery for the UF College of Medicine. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 1653 UFHealth
Dream Team brightens the lives of kids at UF Health Shands Children's Hospital
 
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Dream Team at the University of Florida is a student-run, non-profit organization. Specializing in pediatric cardiology, our program specifically focuses on the children in cardiac care at UF Health Shands Hospital. These children have complicated cardiovascular conditions and some spend extended amounts of time in the hospital. Dream Team aims to dedicate time and service to these children and their families. With passion, enthusiasm, and a shared dedication to brightening the lives of these children in cardiac care, Dream Team works towards facilitating a direct patient volunteer program at the hospital. Visit UF Health ufhealth.org UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 2045 UFHealth
UF Health Department of Emergency Medicine Residency
 
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The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida Gainesville is an independent academic department within the College of Medicine. With the substantial infrastructure and resources from the State's Flagship University dedicated to the missions of research and education, we are committed to training medical students and residents to become superior well-rounded clinicians that have the skills to become educators, researchers, and leaders in emergency medicine. Visit ED emergency.med.ufl.edu Visit UF Health ufhealth.org UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 5372 UFHealth
UF Health Neurosurgery Complex Spine Patient Testimonial
 
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Donna Cohen is a 66-year-old well-known interior designer in Gainesville, Florida who had an unusual inflammatory process in her lumbar spine that resulted in acute deterioration in pain and weakness. Donna was transferred to UF Health Shands Hospital under the care of UF Health neurosurgeon, Dr. Daniel J. Hoh. Donna is one of many success stories at the UF Health Department of Neurosurgery, which provides comprehensive services for the diagnosis, management, treatment and rehabilitation of patients suffering from diseases of the brain, spinal cord and nervous system, including brain tumors, aneurysms, epilepsy, movement disorders and spinal disease and injury. https://ufhealth.org/ http://neurosurgery.ufl.edu/
Просмотров: 1531 UFHealth
UF Health Best Fed Beginnings - Prenatal Breastfeeding Education - Benefits of Breastfeeding - p1
 
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This module is an overview of the current recommendations for infant feeding and the reasons why breastfeeding is beneficial to infants.
Просмотров: 2016 UFHealth
What to expect during your interventional cardiology procedure at UF Health
 
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Cardiac catheterization is used to view the heart and coronary arteries. It allows cardiologists to see the blood flow to and from the heart, view the chambers of the heart and the action of the heart valves and check for any defects in the wall of the heart. In addition, it can locate blockages or narrowing of the coronary arteries. Based on this information, the cardiologist can determine if a patient may benefit from interventional treatments such as angioplasty or if surgery is needed. The UF interventional cardiologists offer all the latest catheter-based treatments for peripheral arterial disease. These include: Angioplasty Stenting Atherectomy Thrombectomy Distal protection devices Patients also have access to percutaneous treatment for other conditions including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and atrial septal defects. Most interventional cardiology procedures are performed on an outpatient basis, and no hospital overnight stay is required. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 2100 UFHealth
UF Health Best Fed Beginnings - Prenatal Breastfeeding Education - Getting Back to Work or School
 
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This module will help expectant parents to plan for the return to work or school and how to maintain breastfeeding for the benefit of mother and baby.
Просмотров: 1005 UFHealth
UF Health patient named Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Florida Champion
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — His body might not always have the energy it needs, but 6-year-old Nathan Ferrell's fun-loving personality stands in stark contrast to his disease as he faces his unique medical challenge with courage every day. Now, Nathan, a patient at UF Health Shands Children's Hospital, will use that courage and his natural charm to tackle a new role that could help other children across the state of Florida. Nathan has been named this year's Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Florida Champion. In this role, Nathan will serve as a fundraising and awareness ambassador for UF Health Shands Children's Hospital, the state of Florida and all children treated at the CMN's 170 member hospitals. Delta Air Lines, Marriott International and Chico's FAS are presenting sponsors of the 2014 Champions program. Shortly before his first birthday, Nathan was diagnosed with mitochondrial disease, a degenerative disease that attacks the mitochondria, which create enough energy for the body's systems to sustain themselves and support growth. At age 3, Nathan was the youngest patient in the U.S. to have an external device called a gastric stimulator implanted in his gastrointestinal tract to treat digestive issues. Additionally, a gastronomy tube inserted through his abdomen provides proper nutrition directly to his stomach, and an oxygen tank ensures he breathes properly. Because there is no cure for the disease, doctors can only treat each symptom separately. However, Nathan perseveres. He has no problem keeping up with his two older sisters, he loves playing on his iPad and he is the Gators' biggest fan. He is also quick to bond with his patient care team, with his playful nature facilitating long-term friendships.
Просмотров: 1113 UFHealth
In pitching injuries, the elbow is connected to the hip bone
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — New University of Florida research suggests that a pitcher's elbow injury could be all in the hips. Kevin W. Farmer, M.D., an assistant professor in the UF department of orthopaedics and rehabilitation, presented research at the March meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons that shows a limited range of motion in a pitcher's hips could risk injury to his elbow. When a pitcher throws, he begins by shifting weight on his feet. He then lifts one knee — the leg opposite his throwing arm — so his thigh is parallel with the ground. Simultaneously, he brings the ball behind his shoulder and begins the pitch, bringing his throwing hand over his shoulder at the same time his raised knee is coming down. That step forward helps power the pitch. When the pitcher performs a pitch, much of the stress is focused on a single ligament: the ulnar collateral ligament. About 1,000 pounds of pressure per square inch can be placed upon that ligament, Farmer said. The mechanics of the throw affects what Farmer and the researchers he worked with call the "elbow valgus torque." Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 1043 UFHealth
UF using sensors to monitor dangerous hits on football field
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- In football, a tackle can supply 100 G’s of force or more, well above the amount that can cause a concussion and more than 10 times the force of an F-16 jet roll maneuver. Now, University of Florida Health researchers are using the helmets of Gator football players to help measure the force of on-field hits as part of ongoing efforts to better understand and prevent concussions and treat them before they cause lasting damage. With a grant from Banyan Biomarkers and matching funds from the Florida High Tech Corridor Council -- together totaling $574,910 -- UF researchers have purchased the Head Impact Telemetry System, or HITS, to measure the impact, duration and location of each hit football players take in real-time through sensors placed in their helmets. Led by Dr. James Clugston, a University Athletic Association team physician at UF and an assistant professor of community health and family medicine, the UF researchers will correlate the data they collect from the sensors with additional data from blood and magnetic resonance imaging tests. This will allow researchers to get a complete picture of concussions when they occur in athletes. “We are still trying to find objective ways to detect concussions and help us know when someone is recovered so they can return to play,” Clugston said. “We wanted to get a measure of the amount of force that athletes were experiencing. With this system, we will get real-time data to assess the severity of the impact.” Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 2772 UFHealth
UF Health Best Fed Beginnings - Prenatal Breastfeeding Education - Getting Started - p2
 
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This module contains information about the very important skin to skin time immediately after the birth of the baby and what to expect in the first few days of the infant's life.
Просмотров: 1295 UFHealth
UF researchers find a lobster's sense of smell may hold the key to better electronic sensors
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida Health researchers and UF engineers have identified neurons involved in smell that help lobsters locate a specific scent, a discovery that may help them develop improved electronic "noses" to detect land mines and other explosives. The team reported the findings in the January issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. For many years, scientists have worked to create electronic "noses," or sensors, that can detect everything from contamination in food products to harmful bacteria, as well as land mines and explosives. And because of the dangerous nature of hazardous material detection, scientists are constantly looking for ways to improve these noses. "An electronic nose has to recognize an odor and locate its source. Finding the source has often been the job of the person handling the electronic nose," said Barry W. Ache, Ph.D., distinguished professor of neuroscience and biology and director of the Center for Smell and Taste in UF's Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute. To date the technology has had its drawbacks — especially when the nose is used to detect potentially deadly materials that could endanger its human handler. Yuriy V. Bobkov, Ph.D., of the UF Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience, originally discovered a type of olfactory neuron in lobsters that constantly discharges small bursts of electrical pulses. UF researchers speculated that these so-called "bursting" neurons might cue the crustaceans in on an odor's location — especially important when they are searching for food or trying to avoid danger. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth Visit the Whitney Lab http://www.whitney.ufl.edu/
Просмотров: 1352 UFHealth
UF Health Neurosurgery Residency Program
 
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The University of Florida Residency in Neurological Surgery is a seven-year program. Following successful completion, trainees are capable of the independent practice of neurological surgery of the highest quality. During all years of the program, without exception, there is strict adherence to the ACGME duty hour's regulations. For more information regarding the UF Health residncey progroma please visit the website http://neurosurgery.ufl.edu/residency/about-our-program/. To make an appointment with a UF Health Neurosurgeon please call our office in Gainesville at (352) 273-9000 or (800) 346-3275. For physician referrals, physicians may make appointments for their patients with any of our UF Health Neurosurgeons by completing our online form or by calling our offices in Gainesville at (352) 273-9000 or (800) 346-3275. For more information regarding UF Health Neurosurgery visit our website www.neurosurgery.ufl.edu. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/
Просмотров: 712 UFHealth
UF Health Best Fed Beginnings - Prenatal Breastfeeding Education - Keeping Your Partner Involved
 
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This module will highlight the value of supportive partners for successful breastfeeding.
Просмотров: 855 UFHealth
Boy's "Chocolate Bar" book raises $950,000 to fight his friend's rare liver disease
 
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Two 7-year-old California boys recently were honored by the University of Florida for their efforts to find a cure for a rare disease. Best friends Dylan Siegel and Jonah Pournazarian were awarded UF's first ever Young Philanthropist Award for their vision, generosity and leadership during the university's inaugural Academy of Golden Gators celebration on Feb. 21. The boys' philanthropic work centers around a 14-page book Dylan wrote in 2012 to raise money to fight the rare genetic disorder that Jonah suffers from called glycogen storage disease. His goal is to raise $1 million through sales of "Chocolate Bar," which reached the $750,000 milestone on Rare Disease Day, a day organized to raise awareness for rare diseases such as GSD and their impact on patients' lives. "Dylan and Jonah are exceptional kids," said UF President Bernie Machen. "Their love for each other is contagious, so people naturally want to be a part of their campaign. My hat is off to both boys for making a difference at such a young age." https://ufhealth.org/glycogen-storage-disease-program/overview Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 10763 UFHealth
UF Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics Core 2 Lab
 
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Welcome to the UF Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics Core 2 Lab! SECIM Core 2 provides nuclear magnetic resonance services to investigators, including global metabolomics for liquid samples and tissue metabolomics through high resolution magic angle spinning. To learn more about SECIM Core 2 services, visit http://secim.ufl.edu/about-secim/secim-core-2-nuclear-magnetic-resonance/ Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 284 UFHealth
New pediatric CICU exemplifies UF Health's commitment to family-focused care
 
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UF Health Shands Children's Hospital celebrated the grand opening of its pediatric cardiac intensive care unit on Jan. 10, 2014. The unit's transformation from administrative offices to advanced clinical space speaks to UF Health's commitment to taking care of kids with congenital heart disease. https://ufhealth.org/ http://chc.med.ufl.edu/
Просмотров: 1358 UFHealth
PhD in Rehabilitation Science at the University of Florida
 
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In this short video, current and former students describe their experience in working towards a PhD in rehabilitation science at the University of Florida. The Rehabilitation Science Doctoral (RSD) Program trains scientists in translational rehabilitation-related research. Our view is that rehabilitation science encompasses both basic and applied aspects of health science and services, the social sciences, and engineering as they relate to restoring functional capacity and improving a person's interaction with the surrounding environment. Thus, the RSD faculty has expertise in a wide range of disciplines ranging from molecular biology through population health. Please review our website for additional information: http://rehabsci.phhp.ufl.edu/
Просмотров: 2523 UFHealth
Older drivers can't handle their alcohol as well as younger drivers
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — You may have only had one glass of wine with dinner, but if you're 55 or older, that single serving may hit you hard enough to make you a dangerous driver. So, baby boomers, what you suspected is true: you can't party like you used to. Sara Jo Nixon, Ph.D., a professor in the departments of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Florida and doctoral candidate Alfredo Sklar tested how drinking legally non-intoxicating levels of alcohol affect the driving skills of two age groups: 36 people ages 25 to 35 and 36 people ages 55 to 70. They found that although neither age group imbibed enough alcohol to put them over the legal driving limit, a blood alcohol level of 0.08, just one drink can affect the driving abilities of older drivers. Based on the study findings published in the journal Psychopharmacology in February, the researchers say it could be time to reassess legal blood alcohol levels for all drivers. "These simulations have been used a lot in looking at older adults, and they have been used at looking how alcohol affects the driving of younger adults, but no one's ever looked at the combination of aging drivers and alcohol," Sklar said Alfredo Sklar. The study is the latest in a body of work by Nixon and her team that looks at how even moderate doses of alcohol affect aging adults. At the beginning of the study, both groups completed a driving task completely sober. The task took the drivers down a simulated winding 3-mile stretch of country road. The drivers stared straight ahead at a large computer monitor. Two computer monitors flanked the first, mimicking the side windows of a car and what the drivers would see in their peripheral vision. A stereo system played driving sounds. A console included a steering wheel and brake and gas pedals. Occasionally, the drivers would encounter an oncoming car, but they did not encounter other distractions. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 677 UFHealth
UF Health among top hospitals with new national comprehensive stroke center certification
 
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The University of Florida Health Shands Comprehensive Stroke Center has earned national comprehensive stroke center certification from The Joint Commission. The UF Health Shands Comprehensive Stroke Center joins an elite group of hospital focused on quality and effective stroke care proven to improve patients’ outcomes. These stroke centers, recognized as industry leaders, set the national agenda in highly specialized stroke care
Просмотров: 675 UFHealth
Mom's Voice Inspires Learning in the Womb
 
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Mozart, Beethoven or even Shakespeare — pregnant mothers have been known to expose their babies to many forms of auditory stimulation. But according to researchers at the University of Florida, all a baby really needs is the sound of his or her mother's voice. Research published in the most recent issue of the journal Infant Behavior and Development shows that babies in utero begin to show evidence of learning or respond to the rhythm of the rhyme by 34 weeks of pregnancy and are capable of remembering a set rhyme until just prior to birth. Nursing researcher Charlene Krueger, Ph.D., A.R.N.P., and her team studied pregnant women who recited a rhyme to their babies three times a day, for 6 weeks, beginning at 28 weeks gestational age, which is the start of the third trimester of pregnancy. "The mother's voice is the predominant source of sensory stimulation in the developing fetus," said Krueger, an associate professor in the UF College of Nursing. "This research highlights just how sophisticated the third trimester fetus really is and suggests that a mother's voice is involved in the development of early learning and memory capabilities." Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 4197 UFHealth
UF Health Neurosurgery
 
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Shortly after the opening of the UF College of Medicine in 1958, the Division of Neurosurgery began under the direction of Dr. Lamar Roberts and one faculty member, Dr. Francisco Garcia-Bengochea. In 1972, Dr. Albert Rhoton assumed the chairmanship of this fledgling division and led its' development to a Department of national and international prominence. Today, under the leadership of Dr. William A. Friedman the department has grown to fifteen clinical faculty, eleven research and education faculty, seventeen resident physicians plus two clinical fellowships, eight advanced registered nurse practitioners, two medical illustrators and eight clinical research staff. In addition there are four joint faculty shared with other departments. Throughout our tremendous growth and development over the last 50 years, we continue the unwavering commitments to: Excellence in Patient Care Excellence in Education Excellence in Research To make an appointment with a UF Health Neurosurgeon please call our office in Gainesville at (352) 273-9000 or (800) 346-3275. For physician referrals, physicians may make appointments for their patients with any of our UF Health Neurosurgeons by completing our online form or by calling our offices in Gainesville at (352) 273-9000 or (800) 346-3275. For more information regarding UF Health Neurosurgery visit our website www.neurosurgery.ufl.edu. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/
Просмотров: 524 UFHealth
UF developing mixed-reality simulators for training in treatment of injured soldiers
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — On the battlefield, wounded soldiers depend on how quickly and efficiently medical personnel can treat and stabilize their life-threatening injuries. To help military medical personnel acquire, practice or maintain these key skills while deployed, University of Florida and U.S. Army Research Laboratory Simulation and Training Technology Center researchers have received a $1.75 million grant to design, develop and validate a set of portable, rugged simulators to help military clinicians train — no matter where in the world they happen to be. This grant was funded by the Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center, a subcommand of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. “If something happens, like 9-11, personnel may get shipped out with little or no time for training stateside,” said the study’s principal investigator, Samsun (Sem) Lampotang, Ph.D., a professor of anesthesiology in the UF College of Medicine and director of the UF Center for Safety, Simulation & Advanced Learning Technologies. “But while stationed overseas in combat zones or waiting for hostilities to start, reservists may still need training to become proficient with unfamiliar military medical procedures or equipment not routinely used in civilian medicine. Each of the proposed simulators will fit inside a military-spec padded case that meets airline-checked luggage size requirements so they can be readily deployed.” Lampotang’s team is building and testing mixed-reality simulators for five different medical procedures, all designed to work in low-tech environments using the same hand-held equipment and tools health care workers employ during actual medical procedures. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 496 UFHealth
Vitamin supplements may prevent drug-induced hearing loss, UF researchers say
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- The drug gentamicin can provide effective treatment for people with bacterial infections that are resistant to other antibiotics, but this medication can cause a serious side effect, too: hearing loss. Now, University of Florida researchers have discovered that a dietary supplement shows promise for protecting against drug-induced hearing loss when taken during gentamicin treatment. The findings of this study in rodents appear online ahead of print in the Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology. Gentamicin belongs to a class of antibiotics called aminoglycosides. They are used to treat infections that are resistant to other antibiotics, including penicillin or amoxicillin. Aminoglycosides are prescribed in the U.S. for conditions such as multidrug-resistant tuberculosis or for frequent lung infections experienced by patients with cystic fibrosis. "In developing countries aminoglycosides are often used as a first-line treatment for any infection because they are so cheap and so readily available," said Colleen Le Prell, the study's lead investigator and an associate professor in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions' department of speech, language and hearing sciences. Other studies have shown that between 2 and 25 percent of patients taking aminoglycoside antibiotics experience hearing loss. Estimates vary because hearing loss may develop slowly over weeks, and hearing tests taken during or immediately after drug treatment may miss hearing loss, Le Prell said. In addition, some studies use hearing tests that are more sensitive to the earliest effects of damage to the cells in the inner ear. Le Prell and colleagues tested the use of a dietary supplement containing the antioxidants beta carotene and vitamins C and E, as well as the mineral magnesium, for protection against gentamicin-induced hearing loss. Hearing loss is largely caused by the production of free radicals, which destroy healthy inner ear cells. The antioxidant vitamins prevent hearing damage by "scavenging" the free radicals and protecting against their effects. In previous studies, Le Prell demonstrated that these supplements prevented noise-induced hearing loss in animals. She is currently testing the vitamin combination in human clinical trials. "We're enthusiastic about the use of these vitamins because of the significant safety profile that exists," Le Prell said. "These agents are generally regarded as safe with very well-known recommended daily intakes." Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF HealthYoutube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 666 UFHealth
Why Choose UF’s Pediatric Residency Program?
 
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The University of Florida Department of Pediatrics has a strong, balanced residency program in general and subspecialty pediatrics, which provides ample time to individualize your learning and meet your personal career goals. The program also offers an excellent housestaff fringe benefit package. The university is located in Gainesville, Florida - a wonderful place to live. The city boasts great restaurants, numerous cultural and athletic events and ample outdoor activities. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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Study proves physical activity helps maintain mobility in older adults
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — It's something we've all heard for years: Exercise can help keep older adults healthy. But now a study, the first of its kind, proves that physical activity can help older adults maintain their mobility and dodge physical disability. A new University of Florida study shows daily moderate physical activity may mean the difference between seniors being able to keep up everyday activities or becoming housebound. In fact, moderate physical activity helped aging adults maintain their ability to walk at a rate 18 percent higher than older adults who did not exercise. "The very purpose of the study is to provide definitive evidence that physical activity can truly improve the independence of older adults," said principal investigator Marco Pahor, Ph.D., director of the UF's Institute on Aging. What's more, moderate physical activity not only helped older adults maintain mobility but also helped prevent the occurrence of long-term mobility loss. Co-principal investigator Jack Guralnik, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said there was a 28 percent reduction in people permanently losing the ability to walk easily. "The fact that we had an even bigger impact on persistent disability is very good," said Guralnik, who also holds a faculty position at UF. "It implies that a greater percentage of the adults who had physical activity intervention recovered when they did develop mobility disability." The results will be published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association and will be presented at 1 p.m. Tuesday (May 27) at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Orlando. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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How We Learn: Painting a picture of the University of Florida College of Medicine
 
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University of Florida Junior Honors and pre-med students paint the 34th Street Wall, a Gainesville tradition, and share why they would like to learn at the College of Medicine. http://www.med.ufl.edu/ http://www.ufhealth.org/ http://drgator.ufl.edu/tag/dr-gator/
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UF Health Best Fed Beginnings - Prenatal Breastfeeding Education - You Can Do It! - p5
 
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This module will discuss feeding positions, ways to get a good latch, and how to read baby's feeding cues.
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UF Health Neurosurgery Radiosurgery
 
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The UF radiosurgery team currently includes two neurosurgeons (Dr.William Friedman, Dr. Kelly Foote), a radiation physicist (Dr. Frank Bova), a biomedical engineer, a computer programmer (Russell Moore), a dedicated patient secretary (Fran Anderson), two radiation oncologists (William Mendenhall, Robert Amdur), as well as doctoral students, residents and medical students performing research projects. In 1985, the UF team decided to implement radiosurgical capability at the University of Florida Shands Teaching Hospital. After reviewing the technology available for radiosurgery planning and radiosurgery treatment, the UF team decided to develop an entirely new approach to radiosurgery, using the linear accelerator as the source of radiation. A new mechanical system to improve accurate delivery of radiosurgery treatment, as well as the first true dedicated computer dosimetry program dedicated to radiosurgery optimization, were created. The University of Florida subsequently patented this new approach to radiosurgery planning and radiosurgery delivery, which has become one of the most popular commercial radiosurgery systems worldwide, known as the Linac Scalpel. This system is now marketed by Varian Systems. To make an appointment with a UF Health Neurosurgeon please call our office in Gainesville at (352) 273-9000 or (800) 346-3275. For physician referrals, physicians may make appointments for their patients with any of our UF Health Neurosurgeons by completing our online form or by calling our offices in Gainesville at (352) 273-9000 or (800) 346-3275. For more information regarding UF Health Neurosurgery visit our website www.neurosurgery.ufl.edu. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/
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Hyundai Hope on Wheels awards $250,000 grant to UF Health cancer researcher
 
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For the third consecutive year, a University of Florida researcher has received a Hyundai Hope on Wheels grant to support childhood cancer research. Elias Sayour, M.D., an assistant professor of neurosurgery and pediatric hematology/oncology, is the 2014 recipient. His research focuses on harnessing the immune system through the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticle vaccines are small enough to deliver molecules to the immune system, which can then be stimulated to induce antitumor activity against pediatric brain tumors. Dr. Sayour and his team will investigate where these particles travel and the kinds of immune responses they generate. The Hyundai Hope on Wheels nonprofit organization and local Hyundai dealers presented the $250,000 award at a ceremony, during which young patients placed their handprints on a vehicle to commemorate their battles against cancer.
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UF Health - Invisible Connections - Grocery
 
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As an infant, Sydney Thomas was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Mark Atkinson has been working for more than 25 years developing treatments to prevent — and even cure — diabetes. Dr. Atkinson's work at UF Health is shedding new light on Sydney's disease. And it's an invisible connection that's helping us move medicine forward. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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Heartfelt farewells
 
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After more than 330 days, teen is youngest person in the world to leave the hospital with a total artificial heart. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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New UF Health program blends holistic therapies and modern medicine
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Acupuncture, meditation, massage — practices once considered "alternatives" to conventional medicine — are now becoming mainstream in hospitals and medical schools nationwide, and University of Florida Health's Integrative Medicine Program is leading the way by expanding its services for patients. As research continues to validate many of these ancient practices as effective treatments for chronic pain, nausea and stress, they've earned a new name that represents this unique partnership of conventional and holistic treatments: integrative medicine. This summer marks the one-year anniversary of the integrative medicine program at UF Health, led by the first fellowship-trained integrative medicine physician in Gainesville, Irene Estores, M.D. The program provides patients and staff with services such as guided imagery, medical acupuncture and yoga. "Integrative medicine addresses the needs of the whole person — mind, body, spirit — in the context of community," said Estores, the program's medical director. "We're coming back to our roots and honoring what was effective in other healing traditions and using that to be able to be more effective in caring for our patients." In July, the Integrative Medicine Program began offering services for patients seeking treatment at UF Health Shands Hospital and UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital. Consultation and referral services for outpatients soon followed, with clinic locations at both UF Health Internal Medicine -- Tower Hill and UF Health Internal Medicine -- Medical Plaza, as well as UF Health Hematology/Oncology -- Davis Cancer Pavilion and at UF Health Integrative Medicine -- Executive Health. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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UF Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics Core 1 Lab
 
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Welcome to the UF Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics Core 1 Lab! SECIM Core 1 provides mass spectrometry services to investigators, offering both global metabolomics and targeted metabolomics services for serum, plasma, urine, tissue, cells, stool and other samples. To learn more about SECIM Core 1 services, visit http://secim.ufl.edu/about-secim/core-1-mass-spectroscopy-services/ Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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UF Pediatric Residency Program – Primary Care Track
 
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Working within the guidelines mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), The University of Florida Department of Pediatrics proudly offers novel training opportunities through our residency tracks at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital. This Primary Care track is for physicians intending to enter general pediatrics. Primary care is the hub where the health care of children is centered, and pediatricians work with subspecialists to coordinate tertiary care. Residents will enhance their pediatrics subspecialty training by participating in electives and receive training in bioinformatics, transition of care and health care policy. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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How long does it take to complete an autopsy?
 
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The UF Health's Martha J. Burt, MD, explains how long it takes to complete an autopsy. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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UF Health - Invisible Connections - Park
 
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When Lowyn Yancey was born, a pinched umbilical cord kept her brain from getting oxygen for several minutes. A cooling technique developed by Dr. Michael Weiss at UF Health helped her brain recover, and today she's a healthy little girl. Michael and Lowyn share an important, if invisible, connection — one that helps us move medicine forward. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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UF Medical Students Ice Bucket Challenge
 
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Third Annual Gator Engineering Day at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital
 
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Patients at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital had the opportunity to interact with soccer-themed game systems that University of Florida students developed in their introductory engineering design course. The incoming freshman students attended a summer class specifically designed to help them successfully transition into the College of Engineering, with fun and engaging projects that have real world applications. This summer, inspired by the World Cup, they were tasked with designing an autonomous mechanical soccer player that is programmed to kick a ball into a goal. Their instructor designed the “goalie.” Patients got to judge the students’ work by choosing their favorite game, while students were able to teach young people about the engineering behind the game systems, reinforcing what they’ve learned in class. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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UF Health Trauma Patient Joseph Parker
 
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Every Friday, Joe Parker visits the UF Health Shands Rehab Hospital to volunteer. He spends most of his time talking to patients who are frustrated by the long, slow, often draining process of recovery and rehabilitation, encouraging them not to give up. To do that, he tells them his story. Joe ParkerOn Nov. 14, 2013, on his way back to work after already finishing a long shift, Parker, 26, fell asleep at the wheel. He woke up to his car careening into the guardrail. Trying to correct, he lost control, hit a ditch and flipped four times. When he came to, his right arm was pinned under the car and he was in the backseat. He hadn’t been wearing a seatbelt. “I probably lay there for 45 minutes or so until someone called 911,” he says. “I couldn’t feel my legs. They cut me out and put a collar on me. One of the guys he asked me if I had ever been on a helicopter ride before. I said, ‘No.’” UF Health ShandsCair flew Parker to the UF Health Shands Trauma Center, where the team quickly assessed him, rushing him to an MRI and CT scan and then into surgery. UF Health ShandsCair flew Parker to the UF Health Shands Trauma Center, where the team quickly assessed him, rushing him to an MRI and CT scan and then into surgery. Parker had suffered a spinal cord injury that left him unable to walk. He spent two weeks in the trauma ICU, where staff members helped him learn how to sit up again. On Nov. 26, he was transferred to UF Health Shands Rehab Hospital. There, therapists began working with him to master daily tasks, such as getting dressed and washing himself. “I have two rods and six screws holding my back together,” he says. “It used to take an hour and a half to shower and now it takes a half-hour. I can dress myself, too.” He was discharged a month later, although he still goes to the UF Health Rehab Center – Magnolia Parke twice a week for physical therapy. In October, he will start additional therapy for his legs and hopes to get braces that will help him relearn how to walk. “I have been improving a lot,” he says. “I can feel my left leg to my foot, and my right leg to my calf. It has been a lot of hard work. I am determined to get up and walk again so I have been pushing myself.” Right now he’s unable to continue his old line of work — he was a semi-truck driver — so Parker also has been focused on finding new opportunities for himself. He loves hunting and the outdoors so he’s starting a nuisance hog removal business and plans to help a friend with his landscaping business. But the highlight of his week is his visit to the Rehab Hospital. “I like when they tell me someone came in and said I changed the way he was thinking,” he says. “I encourage them not to give up. They can overcome these obstacles. If you let a chair hold you back, then you are not going to succeed. “You can overcome anything with the spirit of God and see what he has in store for you. He gave me another chance and has a purpose for me, and I am seeing what it is.”
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UF Health Ice Bucket Challenge
 
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UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital debuts a colorful new entrance
 
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UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital marked an important milestone today (Sept. 3) with the debut of a colorful new façade, a dedicated entrance and the opening of the Sebastian Ferrero Atrium, part of a series of renovations focused on creating a welcoming setting and augmenting high-quality care for children. The Sebastian Ferrero Atrium, designed with the youngest patients and their families in mind, features interactive video displays to entertain children and parents, nature-themed art, a reception desk and elevators that travel solely to floors housing pediatric units. The changes are part of $135 million in improvements that grew out of UF Health’s strategic plan, “Forward Together.” Construction on the $11 million atrium and exterior, designed by the architecture firm Ponikvar and Associates Inc. and built by Ajax Construction Inc., began April 2013. “This event marks an important milestone in our work,” said David S. Guzick, M.D., Ph.D., UF senior vice president for health affairs and UF Health president. “Today is a celebration of the progress we have made with a physical transformation that represents the hospital-centered care we give to our youngest patients. With the opening of the Sebastian Ferrero Atrium, we are more than halfway toward completion of the children’s hospital.”
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UF Health - Invisible Connections - Butterfly Gardens
 
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When Cherise West was diagnosed with leukemia, doctors said she had no matching donors for a bone marrow transplant -- and no hope for a cure. At UF Health, Dr. John Wingard works on transplants from donors who aren't an exact match -- like Cherise's mom. John's work is why Cherise is healthy today even if she never knows it. And it's invisible connections like these that help us move medicine forward with every patient we serve. Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 471 UFHealth