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Видео добавленное пользователем “UFHealth” за 2015
A Dying Orphan Gets a New Family and Help from UF Health Surgeon
 
04:54
Doug and Lori McCary adopted a young girl from China that suffers from hypoplastic right heart syndrome. The McCary's discover the UF Health Congenital Heart Center and surgeon Dr. Bleiweis can help give their newest family member a chance to live life like never before. Alachua American Heart Association Honors Mark Bleiweis UF Health Congenital Heart Center Director Mark Bleiweis, MD, was the 2015 honoree at the Alachua American Heart Association Heart Ball. Bleiweis was honored for his work at UF Health and caring for some of the sickest babies and children in Florida and across the country affected by congenital and acquired heart disease. “Dr. Bleiweis is a gifted surgeon,” said F. Jay Fricker, MD, medical director for the UF Health Congenital Heart Center, and a member of the search committee that selected Bleiweis in 2005. “In more than four decades in pediatric cardiology, I have never experienced any cardiovascular surgeon who is technically better. He is always available to his patients and their families. Dr. Bleiweis is deserving of this honor. I will be forever indebted to him for coming to UF Health and allowing me to experience the miracles that happen in our hospital every day.”
Просмотров: 25479 UFHealth
Sage’s Story - Children’s Miracle Network at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital
 
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Sage was born with a congenital heart defect called Hyponastic Left Heart Syndrome, as he likes to say “I was born with half a heart.” Sage has endured three open heart surgeries and has spent much of his 8 years of life at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital for follow treatment and care! Thanks to the donations made to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital is able to provide the treatments and programs needed to keep Sage well because of donors like you!
Просмотров: 14030 UFHealth
Novel compounds kill biofilms, may eliminate persistent bacterial infections
 
02:44
GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Researchers at the University of Florida have developed potent new compounds with aquatic origins that may offer relief for the 17 million American affected by biofilm-associated bacterial infections annually. The series of compounds known as the halogenated phenazines, or HPs, can kill dangerous bacterial biofilms present in recurring and chronic bacterial infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. The discovery may one day offer a cure for persistent bacterial infections that are largely resistant to conventional antibiotic treatments. “Using synthetic chemistry, we have developed a series of marine antibiotic-inspired molecules that target a problem conventional antibiotics are unable to address because cells housed within bacterial biofilms are tolerant of them,” said Robert Huigens, Ph.D., an assistant professor medicinal chemistry at the UF College of Pharmacy, a part of UF Health, and lead investigator of a study published in the Angewandte Chemie journal’s online edition. “We have been aware that biofilms greatly contribute to infections over the past 20 years, but there are no biofilm-eradicating therapeutic agents available. Discovering and developing potent biofilm-killing agents is the first step toward eradicating biofilms in patients.” Biofilms are bacterial communities that accumulate and attach to surfaces, including live tissues in humans. The bacterial cluster is often slow or non-growing, encased in a protective layer of diverse biological molecules that form a ‘slime,’ and displays tolerance to every known class of antibiotic treatments available. Biofilm infections affect almost every tissue in the body, and without a way to eliminate the biofilm, chronic and sometimes fatal infections develop over time. Common biofilm infections include pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic wounds and implant- and catheter-associated infections.
Просмотров: 3644 UFHealth
Owen’s Story - Children’s Miracle Network at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital
 
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Minutes after his birth, Owen was diagnosed with a congenital heart defect that required immediate and lifesaving care from the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital congenital heart team. He was born with transposition of the great arteries, meaning his two major vessels that carry blood away from the heart – the aorta and the pulmonary artery – were switched. He had two heart surgeries to repair his heart and make it function as normal as possible. The donations to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals truly save kids’ lives, just like Owen’s!
Просмотров: 3095 UFHealth
Deep-sea bacteria could help neutralize greenhouse gas
 
02:38
GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A bacteria plucked from the bottom of the ocean could be put to work neutralizing large amounts of industrial carbon dioxide, a group of UF Health researchers has found. Carbon dioxide, a major contributor to the buildup of atmospheric greenhouse gases, can be captured and neutralized in a process known as sequestration. But converting the carbon dioxide into a harmless compound requires a durable, heat tolerant enzyme. That’s where the bacteria studied by UF Health researchers come into play. The bacteria — Thiomicrospira crunogena — produce carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme that helps break down carbon dioxide in organisms. So what makes the deep-sea bacteria so attractive? It lives in hydrothermal vents, so the enzyme it produces is accustomed to high temperatures. That’s exactly what’s needed for the enzyme to work during the process of reducing industrial carbon dioxide, said Robert McKenna, Ph.D., a professor of biochemistry and microbiology in the UF College of Medicine. “This little critter has evolved to deal with those problems. It has already adapted to some of the conditions it would face in an industrial setting,” he said. The findings by the McKenna’s group, which included graduate research assistant Brian Mahon and graduate student Avni Bhatt, were published recently in the journal Biological Crystallography. The chemistry of sequestering works this way: The enzyme, carbonic anhydrase, catalyzes a chemical reaction of carbon dioxide and water. The carbon dioxide interacts with the enzyme, converting the greenhouse gas into bicarbonate. The bicarbonate can then be further processed into products such as baking soda and chalk.
Просмотров: 3883 UFHealth
UF Health Surgeon Gives Baby Born with Half a Heart a Fighting Chance for Survival
 
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Mauricio Hernandez and his wife Martiza de Jesus share their story of hope after an ultrasound reveled their child has hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Alachua American Heart Association Honors Mark Bleiweis UF Health Congenital Heart Center Director Mark Bleiweis, MD, was the 2015 honoree at the Alachua American Heart Association Heart Ball. Bleiweis was honored for his work at UF Health and caring for some of the sickest babies and children in Florida and across the country affected by congenital and acquired heart disease. “Dr. Bleiweis is a gifted surgeon,” said F. Jay Fricker, MD, medical director for the UF Health Congenital Heart Center, and a member of the search committee that selected Bleiweis in 2005. “In more than four decades in pediatric cardiology, I have never experienced any cardiovascular surgeon who is technically better. He is always available to his patients and their families. Dr. Bleiweis is deserving of this honor. I will be forever indebted to him for coming to UF Health and allowing me to experience the miracles that happen in our hospital every day.”
Просмотров: 3206 UFHealth
Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm
 
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The aorta is the largest artery, transporting blood from the heart to the rest of the body. An aneurysm located in the chest is called a thoracic aortic aneurysm. There are two types of surgical repairs for a thoracic aortic aneurysm: open repair or minimally invasive repair (endovascular repair). This video shows how surgeons at UF Health perform a minimally invasive repair of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in the descending aorta.
Просмотров: 9356 UFHealth
Al’z Place helps families dealing with Alzheimer’s and dementia
 
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Al’z Place, a program provided by ElderCare of Alachua County in Gainesville, Fla. is an adult daycare for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. The program provides therapy and recreational activities for people 18 and older, while also giving their caregivers a respite. Therapeutic activities include physical exercise; active and quiet games; reminiscence; validation therapy; doll therapy; and other failure-free activities. Lunch and two snacks per day are provided. For more information, call (352) 375-3000.
Просмотров: 1030 UFHealth
Courtney’s Story - Children’s Miracle Network at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital
 
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Courtney was diagnosed with stage 5 Retinoblastoma in her right eye in February of 2013. After three round of chemotherapy treatments her doctors decided it would be safest to remove her eye to make sure the cancer did not spread. She is now a health 8 year old who loves to dance and play soccer! Courtney has received the best follow up care and treatments needed to keep her health here at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital. Thanks to donations to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals kids like Courtney are able to follow their dreams.
Просмотров: 1909 UFHealth
Researcher finds key clues about “betel nut” addiction that plagues millions worldwide
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — For hundreds of millions of people around the world, chewing betel nut produces a cheap, quick high but also raises the risk of addiction and oral cancer. Now, new findings by a University of Florida Health researcher reveal how the nut’s psychoactive chemical works in the brain and suggest that an addiction treatment may already exist. The betel nut, a seed of the areca palm, is grown and used throughout India, parts of China and much of Southeast Asia, including Indonesia and most of the Pacific islands. Chewing the betel quid — a mixture of areca nut, spices and slaked lime wrapped in betel vine leaves — has been a cultural tradition in those regions for centuries. In small doses, it creates a sense of euphoria and alertness. Prolonged use can create addiction and the World Health Organization classifies the betel nut as a carcinogen. Findings published today (Oct. 21) in the journal PLOS One show that the nut’s active ingredient, arecoline, acts on the same receptor proteins in the brain as nicotine. This raises the possibility that prescription drugs now used to break nicotine dependence could also be effective against betel nut addiction, said Roger L. Papke, Ph.D., a professor in the UF College of Medicine department of pharmacology and therapeutics. “Without knowing why people become dependent, there was no way to help them get over the dependence. This provides a new avenue toward treating the addiction,” Papke said. The implications of learning more about the nature of betel nut addiction are vast: One estimate puts the number of regular users at 200 million to 600 million, and betel nut is widely regarded as the world’s fourth most-used stimulant after caffeine, alcohol and tobacco.
Просмотров: 19347 UFHealth
UF Department of Biostatistics
 
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Biostatistics is the science of developing and applying analytical methods for research in the health sciences, encompassing both research design and data analysis. At the University of Florida Department of Biostatistics researchers are leading experts in areas of big data analysis, causal inference, clinical trials, disease screening, genetics, genomics, infectious diseases modeling, longitudinal data analysis, medical imaging, and survival analysis. Visit http://biostat.ufl.edu to learn more.
Просмотров: 1668 UFHealth
Young mother thriving after minimally invasive surgery to remove aortic aneurysm
 
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Kraven Gavin was healthy and running her own daycare when a routine gallbladder removal revealed that she had an aortic aneurysm. After being sent to several vascular surgeons in Tallahassee and being told there was nothing they could do for her, Kraven was eventually referred to UF Health vascular surgeon, Dr. Robert Feezor. Dr. Feezor specializes in endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms and was able to perform this minimally invasive procedure on Kraven, which helped her heal faster and get her back to doing what she loves.
Просмотров: 1092 UFHealth
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
 
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The aorta is the largest artery, transporting blood from the heart to the rest of the body. An aneurysm located in the abdomen is called an abdominal aortic aneurysm. There are two types of surgical repairs for an abdominal aortic aneurysm: open repair or minimally invasive repair (endovascular repair). This video shows how surgeons at UF Health perform a minimally invasive repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.
Просмотров: 1636 UFHealth
C. Parker Gibbs, MD, Rebekah’s Surgeon
 
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20-year-old Rebekah Gaudet had her whole life ahead of her when she was diagnosed with aggressive bone cancer in her upper arm. To avoid amputation, doctors in Tallahassee, Florida, recommended she seek treatment at UF Health, where her team of doctors created a plan just for her, stopping the cancer — and saving her arm.
Просмотров: 575 UFHealth
Meet University of Florida Vascular Surgeon, Dr. Adam Beck
 
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Dr. Adam Beck is an assistant professor of surgery in the division of vascular surgery and endovascular therapy at the University of Florida College of Medicine. He serves as director of the UF Health Aorta Center at UF Health Shands Hospital and works with a multidisciplinary team of specialists to treat patients with aortic disease.
Просмотров: 751 UFHealth
City of Gainesville / Alachua County Senior Center keeps area seniors active
 
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Descriptor: Seniors in Alachua County rely on the City of Gainesville / Alachua County Senior Center to provide them with activities that help them to fulfill their needs for body, mind, and spirit. To learn more, visit http://eldercare.ufhealth.org/senior-recreation-center/
Просмотров: 1973 UFHealth
New UF Health Hospitals Fly-through
 
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Просмотров: 4173 UFHealth
Kendall’s Story - Children’s Miracle Network at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital
 
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Kendall was transported to UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital the day she was unexpectedly born with VACTERL Association, a collection of birth defects affecting her vertebrae, digestive tract, heart, trachea, esophagus, kidney and bones. In addition, she suffers pulmonary complications. She spent the first seven weeks of her life at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital – undergoing her first set of surgeries when she was five days old and her first open-heart surgery when she was 26 days old. Thanks to her medical team, Kendall is a thriving and happy young girl! The donations to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals truly save kids’ lives, just like Kendall’s!
Просмотров: 4048 UFHealth
UF College of Pharmacy alumna and researcher explore new depths in drug discovery
 
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College of Pharmacy alumna and supporter Debbie DeSantis, ʼ82, and Hendrik Luesch, Ph.D., an associate professor of medicinal chemistry, share a mutual interest in natural products. In May, the pair enjoyed a rare opportunity to connect in the Florida Keys to collect cyanobacteria, an organism that produces several medically important compounds that could be useful to treat cancer and other diseases. The partnership represented more than just a research opportunity. Luesch serves as the Debbie and Sylvia DeSantis Chair in Natural Products Drug Discovery and Development at the College of Pharmacy, an endowed position funded by Debbie and her mother, Sylvia, in 2002. Debbie has taken interest in Luesch’s research in marine natural products chemistry and welcomed the opportunity to join him to collect cyanobacteria, which live on coral reefs around the world. In the shallow waters off the coast, the pair spent the day snorkeling in search of the seaweed-like organisms. Once removed from the water, the cyanobacteria were stored in plastic bags, frozen and transported back to the laboratory where researchers will use solvents to tease out a mixture of different compounds that may one day be effective in treating various diseases.
Просмотров: 1033 UFHealth
Jean Cibula, MD, Corey’s Neurologist
 
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Corey’s seizures were the result of a scooter accident he’d suffered a few years earlier, in 1997, when he was just a junior in high school. Once the seizures started, they never went away, worsening over time, despite the medications prescribed by doctors in his hometown, Melbourne, Florida. “The medication wasn’t working,” said Raina Hammond, Corey’s wife. “I was having to call 9-1-1 a lot. We felt like we were at a crossroads. We had to do something different.” Corey, now 36 and a stay-at-home dad to 5-year-old daughter Aila, opted to seek treatment at UF Health. His team of epilepsy experts recommended surgery as a way to not only control the seizures but also hopefully reduce the amount of medications Corey would need over time. “Typically after a patient has taken two to three medications and nothing is working, we start thinking about surgery for control,” said Jean Cibula, M.D., one of the UF Health neurologists who treated Corey. “We want to help patients get control of their seizures so they can live their lives.”
Просмотров: 431 UFHealth
Debbra Livingston, MSN, ARNP, BC, Corey's Neurodiagnostics Nurse
 
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Corey’s seizures were the result of a scooter accident he’d suffered a few years earlier, in 1997, when he was just a junior in high school. Once the seizures started, they never went away, worsening over time, despite the medications prescribed by doctors in his hometown, Melbourne, Florida. “The medication wasn’t working,” said Raina Hammond, Corey’s wife. “I was having to call 9-1-1 a lot. We felt like we were at a crossroads. We had to do something different.” Corey, now 36 and a stay-at-home dad to 5-year-old daughter Aila, opted to seek treatment at UF Health. Our team of epilepsy experts recommended surgery as a way to not only control the seizures but also hopefully reduce the amount of medications Corey would need over time. Debbra is one of the members of the team who helps conduct a pre-surgical work up to determine a patient’s candidacy for surgery.
Просмотров: 602 UFHealth
University of Florida debuts state-of-the-art medical education building
 
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After years of planning and construction, a historic day for the University of Florida has arrived with the unveiling of the nation’s premier medical education facility. The George T. Harrell, M.D., Medical Education Building, which opens its doors to students July 29, is designed to support the UF College of Medicine’s updated medical education curriculum as well as the training of students from the other UF Health Science Center colleges and staff from UF Health to ensure the highest level of patient care. The 95,000-square-foot space will provide a dynamic environment for all learners as they hone the skills necessary to respond to society’s changing health care landscape. “This new building provides a model for the entire university — architecturally and pedagogically. In this model, teaching is an important driver of our university’s rise among the best universities in the country,” said Kent Fuchs, Ph.D., president of the University of Florida. “And with this rise, our medical students and health care providers throughout UF Health become ever more prepared to care for patients and to join all UF graduates in helping to bring prosperity and health to the world.” The $46 million facility, located on the north edge of the UF Health Science Center campus on Newell Drive across from the Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute, includes spaces for collaboration, quiet study and reflection, and hands-on interprofessional and team-based education. “The Harrell Medical Education Building embodies the commitment by the University of Florida and UF Health to medical and health care education of the highest order,” said David S. Guzick, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice president for health affairs at UF and president of UF Health. “The building exemplifies how to design a space around a forwarding-looking curriculum. It will provide an identity that our students and faculty can be proud of as they set the standard for medical education.” Named after the college’s visionary founding dean who pioneered the expansion of the UF Health Science Center in the 1950s, the four-story building features a specially designed atrium surrounded by glass, metal and wood accents, providing a bright and welcoming entrance that fosters interaction among students, trainees, faculty and staff. The first floor includes two 4,600-square-foot circular learning studios wired to accommodate collaborative and applied learning activities as well as the medical school admissions office and the H. James Free, M.D., Center for Primary Care Education and Innovation, reflecting the college’s commitment to primary care within the state of Florida.
Просмотров: 5654 UFHealth
The University of Florida celebrates Gatorade's 50th Anniversary
 
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You know how Gatorade changed the game, now see how researchers at the University of Florida are changing the world.
Просмотров: 820 UFHealth
Remarkable results after stroke
 
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Her husband, Harry, realized something was terribly wrong, and called an ambulance. The emergency services personnel determined Catherine was having a stroke. They took her to UF Health Shands Hospital where she was immediately brought from the emergency room to the UF Health Shands Comprehensive Stroke Center.
Просмотров: 613 UFHealth
The Power of Together
 
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A thoughtful long-term business plan empowers us to build on success and continue to meet future needs of those we serve. Now that Forward Together has reached its five-year mark, University of Florida Senior Vice President of Health Affairs David S. Guzick has introduced our next five-year strategic plan: The Power of Together. The result of a year-long process that involved hundreds of faculty, staff and students across the organization, it builds on our “unstoppable momentum” and outlines goals that will enable us to serve more patients and to make an even stronger impact academically and in the research arena.
Просмотров: 1548 UFHealth
Gatorade Fuels Research That is Changing Lives: Dr. Michael Lauzardo
 
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This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of UF’s most important research discoveries — Gatorade. Gatorade not only launched a sports beverage industry, it also created a culture of innovation that persists at UF Health today.
Просмотров: 349 UFHealth
Synergy in Neuromedicine - Epilepsy
 
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Less than one percent of hospitals nationwide have Level 3 or Level 4 designation. UF Health Shands Hospital is one of them. The UF Health Comprehensive Epilepsy Program is a Level 4 program. According to the National Association of Epilepsy Centers, a fourth level center provides the more complex forms of intensive neurodiagnostics monitoring, as well as more extensive medical, neuropsychological and psychosocial treatments. To learn more about UF Health Neuromedicine, check out the 2014 Progress Report (link to http://neurosurgery.ufl.edu/synergy-in-neuromedicine-progress-report-2014-2/). Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 859 UFHealth
Mark Scarborough, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon
 
01:33
20-year-old Rebekah Gaudet had her whole life ahead of her when she was diagnosed with aggressive bone cancer in her upper arm. To avoid amputation, doctors in Tallahassee, Florida, recommended she seek treatment at UF Health, where her team of doctors created a plan just for her, stopping the cancer — and saving her arm.
Просмотров: 378 UFHealth
Synergy in Neuromedicine – Trigeminal Neuralgia
 
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Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare disease that affects less than one percent of the population. UF Health neurosurgeon William Friedman has been treating patients with the disease for more than 30 years, and in that time, he has performed about 2,500 procedures. To learn more about UF Health Neuromedicine, check out the 2014 Progress Report (link to http://neurosurgery.ufl.edu/synergy-in-neuromedicine-progress-report-2014-2/). Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
Просмотров: 314 UFHealth
Dr. Alan Porter
 
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Alan Porter, M.D., a 1971 graduate of the UF College of Medicine, discusses why he and his wife, Claudia, chose to support the George T. Harrell, M.D., Medical Education Building.
Просмотров: 148 UFHealth
UF Department of Epidemiology
 
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Epidemiology is the science of studying patterns of health and causes of disease with the goal of developing interventions to improve population health. At the University of Florida Department of Epidemiology, researchers explore risk of addiction around the world, cancer risk, efforts to reduce heath disparities, infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, and much more. Visit http://epidemiology.phhp.ufl.edu/ to learn more.
Просмотров: 918 UFHealth
UF Health Pathology Laboratories Nerve Specimen Collection and Handling Tutorial
 
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University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories' Client Services Department can be reached at: Toll-free: 888.375.LABS (5227) | Local: 352.265.9900 Visit us online at: http://pathlabs.ufl.edu UF Health Pathology Laboratories Nerve Specimen Collection and Handling Shipping Tutorial Our dedicated Electron Microscopy Department allows the University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories to be the frontrunner in diagnostics. We actively contribute to advancements in the field of muscle and nerve pathology, and to the education of tomorrow's pathologists, neurologists, rheumatologists, and allied clinicians. We practice a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of nerve disorders. In addition to our evaluation of conventional histology and electron microscopy, we routinely utilize a quantitative panel of specialized immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and molecular techniques to provide the highest quality diagnostics in this competitive and ever-changing field. Nerve biopsies allow our neuropathologists to diagnose muscle and nerve disorders and actively support the neurology and rheumatology community at large by providing finely tuned, comprehensive diagnostics. Our nerve kits are streamlined to provide a simplistic approach for our submitters, which in turn drop turn-around time and improve patient care. A nerve specimen kit is comprised of a single formalin container. Also included are prepaid FedEx return envelopes and labels, which include a Saturday delivery sticker for the occasional Friday send-out. A requisition will be folded and placed on top of the specimen container inside the kit. Please be sure to follow the included instructions and completely fill out the forms provided. The Submission requirements are as follows: Place the nerve fragment into the provided formalin container, then seal inside the included biohazard bag. When the kit is received in the laboratory, the specimen containers and associated documents are cross-checked to ensure that the materials are labeled with two unique patient identifiers such as a name, date of birth, medical record number, and site. This is a requirement of the College of American Pathologists, the most stringent laboratory accreditation agency. If all of the appropriate criteria have been met, the specimen is accessioned and brought to the gross room to begin processing. During the grossing process, a representative section is submitted and embedded in paraffin for Light Microscopy. The remaining portion is post-fixed in glutaraldehyde and submitted to the Electron Microscopy department for processing. If you have further questions, please contact our Client Services Department at the number below. Thank you for choosing the University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories, we look forward to serving your future pathology needs. Send nerve specimens to: University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories Attn.: Accessioning 4800 SW 35th Drive Gainesville, FL 32608 Our Client Services Department can be reached at: Toll-free: 888.375.LABS (5227) | Local: 352.265.9900 Visit us online at: http://pathlabs.ufl.edu
Просмотров: 260 UFHealth
Brandi Nunn, RN, UF Health Nurse Navigator
 
02:31
20-year-old Rebekah Gaudet had her whole life ahead of her when she was diagnosed with aggressive bone cancer in her upper arm. To avoid amputation, doctors in Tallahassee, Florida, recommended she seek treatment at UF Health, where her team of doctors created a plan just for her, stopping the cancer — and saving her arm.
Просмотров: 352 UFHealth
UF Health Pathology Laboratories Muscle Specimen Collection and Handling Tutorial
 
02:54
University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories' Client Services Department can be reached at: Toll-free: 888.375.LABS (5227) | Local: 352.265.9900 Visit us online at: http://pathlabs.ufl.edu UF Health Pathology Laboratories Muscle Specimen Collection and Handling Tutorial Our dedicated Electron Microscopy Department allows the University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories to be a frontrunner in diagnostics. We actively contribute to advancements in the field of muscle and nerve pathology, and to the education of tomorrow's pathologists, neurologists, rheumatologists, and allied clinicians. We practice a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of muscle disorders. In addition to our evaluation of conventional histology and electron microscopy, we routinely utilize a quantitative panel of specialized immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and molecular techniques to provide the highest quality diagnostics in this competitive and ever-changing field. Muscle biopsies allow our neuropathologists to diagnose muscle disorders and actively support the neurology and rheumatology community at large by providing finely tuned comprehensive diagnostics. Our muscle kits are streamlined to provide a minimalistic approach for our submitters, which in turn drop turn-around time and improve patient care. Muscle specimen kits are comprised of 3 biohazard bags, a sterile submission cup, and single-use saline moistened gauze packet. Also provided are prepaid FedEx return envelopes and labels, which include a Saturday delivery sticker for the occasional Friday send-out. A requisition will be folded and placed on top of the specimen containers inside the kit. Please be sure to follow the included instructions and completely fill out the forms provided. The Submission requirements are as follows: Once the muscle has been harvested, wrap the specimen in the included saline moistened gauze and seal inside the sterile specimen container. Place the ice in a biohazard bag and double bag it with the largest bag so no leakage occurs. Place the documents in the second biohazard bag and secure the specimen container in the third biohazard bag. When the kit is received in the laboratory, the specimen containers and associated documents are cross-checked to ensure that the materials are labeled with two unique patient identifiers such as a name, date of birth, medical record number, and site. This is a requirement of the College of American Pathologists, the most stringent laboratory accreditation agency. If all of the appropriate criteria have been met, the specimen is accessioned and brought to the gross room to begin processing. During the grossing process, a representative longitudinal and transverse section is removed, submitted, and embedded in paraffin for Light Microscopy. An additional representative portion is removed and submitted in glutaraldehyde for Electron Microscopy studies. The remainder of the unfixed muscle is submitted post fixed to the immunohistology lab for Histochemistry studies. If you have further questions, please contact our Client Services Department at the number below. Thank you for choosing the University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories, we look forward to serving your future pathology needs. Send muscle specimens to: University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories Attn.: Accessioning 4800 SW 35th Drive Gainesville, FL 32608 Our Client Services Department can be reached at: Toll-free: 888.375.LABS (5227) | Local: 352.265.9900 Visit us online at: http://pathlabs.ufl.edu
Просмотров: 464 UFHealth
Randolph B. Mahoney
 
03:10
Randolph B. Mahoney, MPAS, a 2001 graduate of the UF College of Medicine School of Physician Assistant Studies, reflects on why he chose to support the George T. Harrell, M.D., Medical Education Building.
Просмотров: 110 UFHealth
Steven Roper, MD, Corey's Neurosurgeon
 
02:20
Corey’s seizures were the result of a scooter accident he’d suffered a few years earlier, in 1997, when he was just a junior in high school. Once the seizures started, they never went away, worsening over time, despite the medications prescribed by doctors in his hometown, Melbourne, Florida. “The medication wasn’t working,” said Raina Hammond, Corey’s wife. “I was having to call 9-1-1 a lot. We felt like we were at a crossroads. We had to do something different.” Corey, now 36 and a stay-at-home dad to 5-year-old daughter Aila, opted to seek treatment at UF Health. Our team of epilepsy experts recommended surgery as a way to not only control the seizures but also hopefully reduce the amount of medications Corey would need over time. Prior to surgery, the team maps out the part of the brain responsible for the seizures. In Corey’s case, initial tests weren’t clear, so physicians took the extra step of implanting electrodes deeper into the brain to make sure they obtained a precise picture of the problem area. The testing revealed that Corey’s seizures stemmed from the temporal lobe, so Dr. Roper carefully removed a problematic segment in May 2013.
Просмотров: 347 UFHealth
UF Health Pathology Laboratories Renal Specimen Collection and Handling Tutorial
 
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University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories' Client Services Department can be reached at: Toll-free: 888.375.LABS (5227) | Local: 352.265.9900 Visit us online at: http://pathlabs.ufl.edu UF Health Pathology Laboratories Renal Specimen Collection and Handling Tutorial Our dedicated Electron Microscopy Department allows the University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories to be a frontrunner in diagnostics. Kidney biopsies allow our nephropathologists to diagnose renal disease, assess prognoses, aid in the selection of a specific therapeutic approach, and monitor disease progression in both native and transplant kidneys. Each specimen kit is comprised of two fixatives, formalin and Michel's. Also provided are prepaid FedEx return envelopes and labels, which include a Saturday delivery sticker for the occasional Friday send-out. A requisition will be folded and placed on top of the specimen containers inside the kit. Please be sure to follow the included instructions and completely fill out the forms provided. If a dissecting scope is available once the specimen has been harvested, check the quality of the needle core by looking for glomuleri. The glomuleri will resemble red-pink domes visible throughout the core. The Submission requirements are as follows: If you have multiple cores, place a single core in the Michel's medium and the remaining cores in the formalin. If you have two cores, place one core in formalin and the remaining core in Michel's fixative If you have a single core greater than 5 mm, remove 1 mm from each end of the needle core and place the two tips in the formalin container. Cut the remaining kidney core in half and place one half into the Michel's solution and the remaining half into the formalin with the two tips. If you have a single core less than 5 mm or scant tissue, submit one half of the core in the Michel's fixative and the other half in formalin. When the kit is received in the laboratory, the specimen containers and associated documents are cross-checked to ensure that the materials are labeled with two unique patient identifiers such as a name, date of birth, medical record number, and site. This is a requirement of the College of American Pathologists, the most stringent laboratory accreditation agency. If all of the appropriate criteria have been met, the specimen is accessioned and brought to the gross room to begin processing. During the grossing process, a portion of the formalin-fixed kidney core is post-fixed in glutaraldehyde for Electron Microscopy. The Michele's portion is submitted to the Immunohistology lab for Histochemistry studies. The remainder of the formalin-fixed specimen is embedded in paraffin and processed for Light Microscopy. If you have additional questions, please contact our Client Services Department at the number below. Thank you for choosing the University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories, we look forward to serving your future pathology needs. Send renal specimens to: University of Florida Health Pathology Laboratories Attn.: Accessioning 4800 SW 35th Drive Gainesville, FL 32608 Our Client Services Department can be reached at: Toll-free: 888.375.LABS (5227) | Local: 352.265.9900
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University of Florida Health breaks ground for new hospitals
 
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida Health broke ground today for the UF Health Heart & Vascular Hospital and the UF Health Neuromedicine Hospital, a $415 million project that will give rise to the Southeast’s most advanced home for the care of patients with heart, vascular and neurological illnesses. The UF Health & Vascular Hospital will focus solely on patients with heart and vascular needs while the UF Neuromedicine Hospital will focus on patients with neurologic needs. Housed in one contiguous building, each hospital’s focus will give patients concentrated care for some of the most complex health conditions. Consolidating cardiac and neurologic experts in one location will help to provide shorter procedure times for patients, provide a variety of treatment options and promote shorter hospital stays and faster recovery. “These two new hospitals reflect the goals outlined in our strategic plan, to offer our patients a continuum of compassionate care that will address their cardiovascular and neurologic needs throughout their lives,” said David S. Guzick, M.D., Ph.D. “While we already provide state-of-the-art care to these patients, the two new hospitals will provide a healing environment that revolves around our patients, one location to address everything from outpatient visits and easy access to laboratory tests and imaging to complex surgeries and follow-up care.” The hospitals also will provide a place where UF Health can grow. Florida has recently been named the third most populous state. The rising population means a rising number of patients coming into the UF Health system.
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Shoulder Arthroplasty Patient Education Video
 
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Physicians from UF Health - Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Institute describe what a patient should expect before, during and after their shoulder arthroplasty surgery. For more information, call (352) 273-7001 or visit https://ufhealth.org/uf-health-orthopaedics-and-sports-medicine-institute.
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Year-round Baseball in the South Could Lead to More Injuries
 
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Baseball pitchers are prone to elbow injuries, but pitchers who live or play in the South are at even more risk, a new University of Florida Health study finds. Blame the weather. The warmer climate that draw tourists and retirees also allows for year-round ball, which can lead to throwing-arm overuse. The paper, which will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine in April, shows that college baseball pitchers are at a 5.5 percent higher risk for tearing a ligament in their elbow, an injury that primarily plagues pitchers, if they currently play in the South. Additionally, pitchers who pitched high school baseball in southern states are 6.2 percent more likely to tear the ligament compared to pitchers who pitched high school baseball in northern states. UF Health researchers hope their study will help inform coaches and parents of young baseball players who are beginning their careers, so that they will understand the risks of overuse. Tearing of the ulnar collateral ligament, a ligament that wraps from the upper arm bone to the ulnar in the forearm, often leads to a surgery called the Tommy John surgery. The procedure, named after a major league pitcher who had the surgery in 1974, has been performed more frequently in recent years. A position statement published on the American Sports Medicine Institute website says the conditions that lead to the surgery, which include pitching while fatigued or in pain, pitching year-round and pitching on multiple teams, are at an epidemic level. Primary author, Dr. Jason Zaremski Second author, Dr. MaryBeth Horodyski Senior aurthor, Dr. Kevin Farmer Assistance by Dr. Robert Donlan Mrs. Sonya T Brisbane.
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UF Health Dermatology
 
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As Floridians we love our sunshine. So it's important to give your skin the care it deserves. UF Health Dermatology is the premier dermatology practice in north and north central Florida.
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Gatorade Fuels Research That is Changing Lives: Dr. Chris Hass
 
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This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of UF’s most important research discoveries — Gatorade. Gatorade not only launched a sports beverage industry, it also created a culture of innovation that persists at UF Health today.
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UFHealth Corey's Story
 
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Caring for Hearts and Minds: UF Health Breaks Ground on New Hospitals
 
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Visit UF Health https://ufhealth.org/ UF Health Youtube www.youtube.com/user/UFHealthScience UF Health Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UFHealth UF Health Twitter https://twitter.com/UFHealth
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UF Sleep Study
 
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The University of Florida is looking for children to participate in a treatment study to improve sleep. If your child is uncooperative before bedtime, or experiences difficulty falling or staying asleep, they may be eligible to receive an 8-week drug-free treatment at no cost. For more information, call the UF Sleep Study at 352-273-5285.
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Sue Moninger, Rebekah's Mother
 
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20-year-old Rebekah Gaudet had her whole life ahead of her when she was diagnosed with aggressive bone cancer in her upper arm. To avoid amputation, doctors in Tallahassee, Florida, recommended she seek treatment at UF Health, where her team of doctors created a plan just for her, stopping the cancer — and saving her arm.
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UF Health New Hospitals Sandcastle Time-lapse
 
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UFHealth Delores
 
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