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‪Gullah Documentary: Queen Quet describes a "Bin Yah"‬
 
04:37
A scene from the Documentary Film: "Bin Yah" http://www.BinYahFilm.org Bin Yah: [Gullah] n. sing. 1. "been here": natives, long-time residents Come Yah: [Gullah] n. sing. 1: "come here": newcomers Bin Yah: There's No Place Like Home is a documentary presented by The ChasDOC Film Society that explores the potential loss of important historic African American communities in Mt. Pleasant, S.C due to growth and development. Through the testimonies of the residents themselves, the film explores the culture, the history, the importance of land and the concept of home, giving a voice to those who seldom have had a chance to be heard. A proposed highway extension threatens to bisect these close-knit neighborhoods of cousins and kinfolk, established by freed slaves and home to generations of their families for hundreds of years. Many residents are artisans and craftspeople, practicing traditional skills including sweetgrass basketmaking, brought over from West Africa and handed down from mothers and fathers to sons and daughters. Today, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina is the primary place in the U.S. where this grass is harvested and "sewn" into this particular type of basket. Bin Yah will attempt to preserve -- at least on film -- the memories of the special places that may be lost forever as the struggle between the real "bin yahs" and the "come yahs" escalates Total Running Time: 56 minutes Shot on location in sunny Charleston & Mount Pleasant, South Carolina http://www.BinYahFilm.org Produced by Nancy Cregg & Cara White Directed & Edited by Justin Nathanson RENT "Bin Yah" on AMAZON.COM : http://www.amazon.com/Bin-Yah-Theres-PLace-Like/dp/B0031ZNGEI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=digital-video&qid=1283438978&sr=8-1 BUY "BIn Yah" on AMAZON.COM : http://www.amazon.com/Bin-Yah-Theres-PLace-Like/dp/B00305GK24/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1283438978&sr=8-2
Просмотров: 35872 cutcoECO
Charleston's Indigenous Sweetgrass Artists
 
04:40
A scene from the Documentary Film: "Bin Yah" http://www.BinYahFilm.org Bin Yah: [Gullah] n. sing. 1. "been here": natives, long-time residents Come Yah: [Gullah] n. sing. 1: "come here": newcomers Enslaved Africans in the Lowcountry along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia mostly originated from western Africa and shared similar language and culture. They brought with them unique customs, art forms, and created new ones, as they assimilated into a newer European-style culture on the plantations. One of the most visible traditions is a unique method of "sewing" baskets made of sweetgrass (Muhlenbergia filipes or Muhlenbergia capillaries depending on who's doing the describing). Sweetgrass is a fine bladed, sweet vanilla fragranced perennial grass that grows behind coastal sand dunes in moist soils. Rather than using the weaving technique of most basketmakers, Gullah basketmakers bundle dry sweetgrass and coil it into baskets held together by sewing the coils with thin strands of saw palmetto leaves. Dark reddish-brown bulrush and pine needles are often interwoven with the light colored sweetgrass to add color and patterns as well as the added strength of the bulrush. Today, sweetgrass baskets have become a cherished and sought after Lowcountry art form with the majority of basketmakers centered in the beautiful Charleston and Mt. Pleasant areas of coastal South Carolina. Residents and visitors to the Lowcountry buy and display sweetgrass baskets in their homes with the same intent and enthusiasm that they would for any other fine piece of art. More than display pieces, however, sweetgrass baskets are durable in use and will last indefinitely with minimal care. Baskets around our home find utility for beautifully housing fruits and breads, car keys and wallets, and outgoing mail. And then there are special pieces that sit proudly on the buffet with no other utility than to display their careful craftsmanship and the artist's skill of design. Large, complex pieces can take months to complete and are increasingly being purchased by collectors and museums around the world, including the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. This tradition is threatened, however, by declines in habitat for sweetgrass due to unprecedented coastal development, and the mis-management of growth. These topics are in our film, "Bin Yah", and are spoken about for the first time very freely on film, by the artists and residents themselves. RENT "Bin Yah" on AMAZON.COM : http://www.amazon.com/Bin-Yah-Theres-PLace-Like/dp/B0031ZNGEI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=digital-video&qid=1283438978&sr=8-1 BUY "BIn Yah" on AMAZON.COM : http://www.amazon.com/Bin-Yah-Theres-PLace-Like/dp/B00305GK24/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1283438978&sr=8-2 Produced by Nancy Cregg & Cara White Directed & Edited by Justin Nathanson http://www.binyahfilm.org Bin Yah: There's No Place Like Home is a documentary film produced by The ChasDOC Film Society that explores the potential loss of important historic African American communities in Mt. Pleasant, S.C due to growth and development. Through the testimonies of the residents themselves, the film explores the culture, the history, the importance of land and the concept of home, giving a voice to those who seldom have had a chance to be heard. A proposed highway extension threatens to bisect these close-knit neighborhoods of cousins and kinfolk, established by freed slaves and home to generations of their families for hundreds of years. Many residents are artisans and craftspeople, practicing traditional skills including sweetgrass basketmaking, brought over from West Africa and handed down from mothers and fathers to sons and daughters. Today, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina is the primary place in the U.S. where this grass is harvested and "sewn" into this particular type of basket. Bin Yah will attempt to preserve -- at least on film -- the memories of the special places that may be lost forever as the struggle between the real "bin yahs" and the "come yahs" escalates http://www.BinYahFilm.org
Просмотров: 5950 cutcoECO
Artists are Threatened
 
08:16
A scene from the Documentary Film: "Bin Yah" http://www.BinYahFilm.org Enslaved Africans in the Lowcountry along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia mostly originated from western Africa and shared similar language and culture. They brought with them unique customs, art forms, and created new ones, as they assimilated into a newer European-style culture on the plantations. One of the most visible traditions is a unique method of "sewing" baskets made of sweetgrass (Muhlenbergia filipes or Muhlenbergia capillaries depending on who's doing the describing). Sweetgrass is a fine bladed, sweet vanilla fragranced perennial grass that grows behind coastal sand dunes in moist soils. Rather than using the weaving technique of most basketmakers, Gullah basketmakers bundle dry sweetgrass and coil it into baskets held together by sewing the coils with thin strands of saw palmetto leaves. Dark reddish-brown bulrush and pine needles are often interwoven with the light colored sweetgrass to add color and patterns as well as the added strength of the bulrush. Today, sweetgrass baskets have become a cherished and sought after Lowcountry art form with the majority of basketmakers centered in the beautiful Charleston and Mt. Pleasant areas of coastal South Carolina. Residents and visitors to the Lowcountry buy and display sweetgrass baskets in their homes with the same intent and enthusiasm that they would for any other fine piece of art. More than display pieces, however, sweetgrass baskets are durable in use and will last indefinitely with minimal care. Baskets around our home find utility for beautifully housing fruits and breads, car keys and wallets, and outgoing mail. And then there are special pieces that sit proudly on the buffet with no other utility than to display their careful craftsmanship and the artist's skill of design. Large, complex pieces can take months to complete and are increasingly being purchased by collectors and museums around the world, including the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. This tradition is threatened, however, by declines in habitat for sweetgrass due to unprecedented coastal development, and the mis-management of growth. These topics are in our film, "Bin Yah", and are spoken about for the first time very freely on film, by the artists and residents themselves. BUY "BIn Yah" on AMAZON.COM : http://www.amazon.com/Bin-Yah-Theres-PLace-Like/dp/B00305GK24/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1283438978&sr=8-2 Produced by Nancy Cregg & Cara White Directed & Edited by Justin Nathanson http://www.binyahfilm.org Bin Yah: There's No Place Like Home is a documentary film produced by The ChasDOC Film Society that explores the potential loss of important historic African American communities in Mt. Pleasant, S.C due to growth and development. Through the testimonies of the residents themselves, the film explores the culture, the history, the importance of land and the concept of home, giving a voice to those who seldom have had a chance to be heard. A proposed highway extension threatens to bisect these close-knit neighborhoods of cousins and kinfolk, established by freed slaves and home to generations of their families for hundreds of years. Many residents are artisans and craftspeople, practicing traditional skills including sweetgrass basketmaking, brought over from West Africa and handed down from mothers and fathers to sons and daughters. Today, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina is the primary place in the U.S. where this grass is harvested and "sewn" into this particular type of basket. Bin Yah will attempt to preserve -- at least on film -- the memories of the special places that may be lost forever as the struggle between the real "bin yahs" and the "come yahs" escalates http://www.BinYahFilm.org
Просмотров: 2116 cutcoECO
The Grant Process (HD)
 
02:32
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 8798 cutcoECO
What is a Solar Hot Water Drainback Tank? (HD)
 
01:46
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 4704 cutcoECO
Saving a Species
 
05:02
A theatrical trailer I edited for a documentary project.
Просмотров: 2548 cutcoECO
A Spin Around the Camp (HD)
 
01:53
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 1330 cutcoECO
Baby Monkeys in the Wild
 
01:29
Baby Drill Monkeys in the Jungle of Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. These monkeys are endangered - and headed for extinction if nothing is done to save them! Please help us do that! Consider donating a few dollars to our new conservation documentary, The Drill Project. http://www.thedrillproject.com
Просмотров: 38680 cutcoECO
1st residential solar panel system install (HD)
 
02:20
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher. It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 1673 cutcoECO
Whale Wars - Pete Bethune's Earthrace Ship before it became the Ady Gil
 
03:28
A shout out to Pete Bethune, his crew, and all that continue to kick ass and take names in the name of doing what is right. When Pete Bethune was cruising his Earthrace boat around the globe creating global awareness of the need for renewable fuels, he stopped in Charleston SC to promote sustainable living. We captured him on film, with a bit of his boat, which eventually became the Ady Gil, featured on Discovery Channel's Whale Wars (excellent show). BIRTH OF THE ADY GIL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4sKyKh4AC8 The Ady Gil harassed Japanese whaling vessels during their hunt. The crew towed ropes in an attempt to foul the propellers of the Japanese ships and pointed laser dazzlers at the crew of the Shōnan Maru 2 while using a projectile launcher to fire capsules of foul-smelling butyric acid. THE COLLISION: On January 6, 2010 the vessel was involved in a collision at sea with the Japanese vessel Shōnan Maru 2, which was engaged in security and support for the whaling fleet. One Ady Gil crew member had six broken ribs. Crew on three vessels, the Shōnan Maru 2, the Ady Gil, and the MY Bob Barker, a Sea Shepherd Conservation Society support ship, took footage of the incident, and video of the incident has been released by both the Institute of Cetacean Research and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_KnBKriGog The Earthrace Boat / Ady Gil was a 78-foot (24 m), wave-piercing trimaran, which was originally created as part of a project to break the world record for circumnavigating the globe in a powerboat. The vessel was powered by biodiesel fuel, but was also capable of running on regular diesel fuel. It used other eco-friendly materials, such as vegetable oil lubricants, hemp composites, and non-toxic anti-fouling, and had features such as bilge water filters. The financial loss of the Ady Gil was estimated at about $1.5 million. A donor has reportedly offered $1 million towards the construction of the Ady Gil 2,and Sea Shepherd later announced plans to build a new Ady Gil by December, paid for by the same sponsor, who also organized a fundraising event for the group after the loss of the boat. The new version of the Ady Gil will likely be improved for use by Sea Shepherd, and cost between $3 and $5 million. However, the group also noted the option of acquiring an existing vessel instead, and renaming it Ady Gil 2. GREENPEACE: http://www.greenpeace.org/usa SEA SHEPARD CONSERVATION SOCIETY: http://www.seashepherd.org EARTHRACE: http://www.earthrace.net WHALE WARS: http://animal.discovery.com/tv/whale-wars THE CUT COMPANY: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 7937 cutcoECO
Solar Energy in Charleston, SC - How the panels work (HD)
 
03:22
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 1480 cutcoECO
A Break in the Weather (HD)
 
02:31
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 196 cutcoECO
Meet Ned Collins, Camp St. Christopher (HD)
 
02:35
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 661 cutcoECO
stray dog humps lady!!
 
00:34
Lowcountry Local First advocates the benefits of a local living economy by strengthening community support for independent locally owned businesses and farmers. http://www.lowcountrylocalfirst.org Lowcountry Local First is committed to building a network of small businesses that allows all business owners to participate on the same level. Retail, manufacturing and agricultural businesses will unite with the same mission - to promote and preserve their local economy through the promotion of their goods and services. We are an alliance that educates the public on the importance of supporting the local economy, and encourages businesses and consumers to be environmentally sustainable and socially responsible. Lowcountry Local First is the 44th networks of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE). The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks representing 22,000 independent business members across 30 U.S. States and Canadian provinces. BALLE networks create local living economies through the building blocks of independent retail, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, green building, local zero-waste manufacturing, community capital, independent media, and local arts and culture. We envision a sustainable global economy as a network of Local Living Economies, building long-term economic empowerment and prosperity in communities through local business ownership, economic justice, cultural diversity and a healthy natural environment. Independent businesses create wealth by engaging local people in the production, marketing, and consumption of goods, they pay taxes, and reinvest in our communities. Video produced as part of campaign by the cut company: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 5549 cutcoECO
Maintenance Free Solar Energy (HD)
 
01:28
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 580 cutcoECO
Erica Myers, SC State Energy Office
 
02:32
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 260 cutcoECO
A New Solar Water System: Making a HUGE Difference (HD)
 
02:25
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 553 cutcoECO
Solar Panels UP! (HD)
 
02:28
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 8850 cutcoECO
Butt implants GONE WRONG!
 
00:54
Lowcountry Local First advocates the benefits of a local living economy by strengthening community support for independent locally owned businesses and farmers. http://www.lowcountrylocalfirst.org Lowcountry Local First is committed to building a network of small businesses that allows all business owners to participate on the same level. Retail, manufacturing and agricultural businesses will unite with the same mission - to promote and preserve their local economy through the promotion of their goods and services. We are an alliance that educates the public on the importance of supporting the local economy, and encourages businesses and consumers to be environmentally sustainable and socially responsible. Lowcountry Local First is the 44th networks of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE). The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks representing 22,000 independent business members across 30 U.S. States and Canadian provinces. BALLE networks create local living economies through the building blocks of independent retail, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, green building, local zero-waste manufacturing, community capital, independent media, and local arts and culture. We envision a sustainable global economy as a network of Local Living Economies, building long-term economic empowerment and prosperity in communities through local business ownership, economic justice, cultural diversity and a healthy natural environment. Independent businesses create wealth by engaging local people in the production, marketing, and consumption of goods, they pay taxes, and reinvest in our communities. Video produced as part of campaign by the cut company: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 9890 cutcoECO
Why Solar Energy? (HD)
 
02:58
Free Energy From the Sun: THE clean, never ending resource! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 12396 cutcoECO
1st residential solar panel system install - CLOSE UP (HD)
 
02:19
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 3226 cutcoECO
A Long Road, A Great Team
 
03:38
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 165 cutcoECO
Challenges at Jamies Lodge
 
02:31
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 152 cutcoECO
Giving Back (HD)
 
02:38
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 161 cutcoECO
Coal Companies: Up Against the Wall (HD)
 
01:20
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 183 cutcoECO
To Catch A Predator - charleston, south carolina
 
03:19
As the green movement sweeps the globe, companies, trade groups and government organizations are eager to get a piece of the pie. 'Green' can definitely translate into big profits if you do it right -- but all too often, these money-hungry entities choose to fudge the facts in an attempt to make themselves seem more environmentally friendly and responsible than they really are. That's called greenwashing.
Просмотров: 3041 cutcoECO
Carl Voeker Drops By (HD)
 
02:24
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 103 cutcoECO
language tutor?
 
00:42
Lowcountry Local First advocates the benefits of a local living economy by strengthening community support for independent locally owned businesses and farmers. http://www.lowcountrylocalfirst.org Lowcountry Local First is committed to building a network of small businesses that allows all business owners to participate on the same level. Retail, manufacturing and agricultural businesses will unite with the same mission - to promote and preserve their local economy through the promotion of their goods and services. We are an alliance that educates the public on the importance of supporting the local economy, and encourages businesses and consumers to be environmentally sustainable and socially responsible. Lowcountry Local First is the 44th networks of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE). The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks representing 22,000 independent business members across 30 U.S. States and Canadian provinces. BALLE networks create local living economies through the building blocks of independent retail, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, green building, local zero-waste manufacturing, community capital, independent media, and local arts and culture. We envision a sustainable global economy as a network of Local Living Economies, building long-term economic empowerment and prosperity in communities through local business ownership, economic justice, cultural diversity and a healthy natural environment. Independent businesses create wealth by engaging local people in the production, marketing, and consumption of goods, they pay taxes, and reinvest in our communities. Video produced as part of campaign by the cut company: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 143 cutcoECO
Skype Call - Paul Fleury & Alt. Energy Technologies
 
07:45
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 147 cutcoECO
What Hurricane? (HD)
 
02:20
Solar Energy! On beautiful Seabrook Island, nestled on the coast just south of Charleston, South Carolina, lies Camp St. Christopher It offers over 300 acres of beach, marsh and maritime forest and multiple facilities including meeting and conference centers, lodging, and worship centers. We're excited about keeping you up-to-date on our progress and informing you about how this project was made possible. The process began last August when the State Energy Office put out information that there were going to be $2.9 million available in grants for alternative energy projects for non-profits. As soon as we found out, we immediately started getting in touch with local Charleston non-profit organizations to inform them about the opportunity. When St. Christopher responded about being interested, we setup a meeting for late September 2009 and went out to view the grounds and start planning. The RFP from the State was issued in early September. The government was looking at multiple factors before approving a non-profit like St. Christopher for the grant. These included visibility of project, potential job creation, overall benefit in terms of investment and payback of the project (they needed a minimum return of $2.50 dollars to $1 spent). The grant writing process was long and hard, but St. Christopher didn't have to worry about that. SES took care of making sure the grant was completed correctly and on time. Anything we were able to do to make the process easier for them, we did! After submitting the grant, we found out in March that St. Christopher was awarded the money! After that, it was really time for us to get moving. It took till June to actually get the contracts squared away with the state. We then went through the permitting process. We put together architectural drawings done by the camp director, roof mounting drawings, basically everything that needed to be done to the camp to get it ready for installation. The buildings needed some retrofits to make the project possible. For example, the roofing mounts had to be able to withstand 130mph winds with 150 mph gusts.....just one of many details to iron out. We were permitted by the 2nd week of July and started work the next week. Needless to say, the past year has been full of paperwork and phone calls, red tape and patience. One of our main goals when working with a non-profit to obtain funding or a grant is to shoulder as much of the work as possible. So far, it's been a very successful project with St. Christopher. Stay tuned in weeks to come for pictures and videos on the construction, retrofits, and installation. We want you to follow along with this project with us. Also, if you're involved in a non-profit, there are still government moneys available for your organization. Even if you aren't sure if you qualify, get in touch with us and we'll help you get moving forward on an alternative energy project. clean natural state federal tax credits install "Justin Nathanson" "Paul Fleury" Greg Adam independence solutions free save "how to" bills "South Carolina Solar Council" "American Solar Energy Society" "Solar Energy Industries Association" "South Carolina Solar Business Aliiance" information SCE&G SCANA Cooperative utility Duke Santee Cooper
Просмотров: 458 cutcoECO
contractor?
 
00:21
Lowcountry Local First advocates the benefits of a local living economy by strengthening community support for independent locally owned businesses and farmers. http://www.lowcountrylocalfirst.org Lowcountry Local First is committed to building a network of small businesses that allows all business owners to participate on the same level. Retail, manufacturing and agricultural businesses will unite with the same mission - to promote and preserve their local economy through the promotion of their goods and services. We are an alliance that educates the public on the importance of supporting the local economy, and encourages businesses and consumers to be environmentally sustainable and socially responsible. Lowcountry Local First is the 44th networks of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE). The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks representing 22,000 independent business members across 30 U.S. States and Canadian provinces. BALLE networks create local living economies through the building blocks of independent retail, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, green building, local zero-waste manufacturing, community capital, independent media, and local arts and culture. We envision a sustainable global economy as a network of Local Living Economies, building long-term economic empowerment and prosperity in communities through local business ownership, economic justice, cultural diversity and a healthy natural environment. Independent businesses create wealth by engaging local people in the production, marketing, and consumption of goods, they pay taxes, and reinvest in our communities. Video produced as part of campaign by the cut company: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 24 cutcoECO
TERRIFIED of roller coasters!?
 
00:28
Lowcountry Local First advocates the benefits of a local living economy by strengthening community support for independent locally owned businesses and farmers. http://www.lowcountrylocalfirst.org Lowcountry Local First is committed to building a network of small businesses that allows all business owners to participate on the same level. Retail, manufacturing and agricultural businesses will unite with the same mission - to promote and preserve their local economy through the promotion of their goods and services. We are an alliance that educates the public on the importance of supporting the local economy, and encourages businesses and consumers to be environmentally sustainable and socially responsible. Lowcountry Local First is the 44th networks of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE). The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks representing 22,000 independent business members across 30 U.S. States and Canadian provinces. BALLE networks create local living economies through the building blocks of independent retail, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, green building, local zero-waste manufacturing, community capital, independent media, and local arts and culture. We envision a sustainable global economy as a network of Local Living Economies, building long-term economic empowerment and prosperity in communities through local business ownership, economic justice, cultural diversity and a healthy natural environment. Independent businesses create wealth by engaging local people in the production, marketing, and consumption of goods, they pay taxes, and reinvest in our communities. Video produced as part of campaign by the cut company: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 1233 cutcoECO
McDonalds McFood McAlternative
 
02:25
A GROWING number of Americans are taking their health and well-being into their own hands, in part because they have lost faith in the institutions that are supposed to improve their lives. Upper-middle-class and middle-class baby boomers who are facing their mortality, along with younger people who have grown up with a concern for the environment, are turning to food, dietary supplements and alternative medical treatments to enhance the quality and length of their lives. One of the most obvious manifestations of the movement is what Gerald Celente has christ'ned the "clean-food diet."
Просмотров: 531 cutcoECO
Hey Jude by a lil' dude
 
00:51
Lowcountry Local First advocates the benefits of a local living economy by strengthening community support for independent locally owned businesses and farmers. http://www.lowcountrylocalfirst.org Lowcountry Local First is committed to building a network of small businesses that allows all business owners to participate on the same level. Retail, manufacturing and agricultural businesses will unite with the same mission - to promote and preserve their local economy through the promotion of their goods and services. We are an alliance that educates the public on the importance of supporting the local economy, and encourages businesses and consumers to be environmentally sustainable and socially responsible. Lowcountry Local First is the 44th networks of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE). The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE) is North America's fastest growing network of socially responsible businesses, comprised of over 80 community networks representing 22,000 independent business members across 30 U.S. States and Canadian provinces. BALLE networks create local living economies through the building blocks of independent retail, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, green building, local zero-waste manufacturing, community capital, independent media, and local arts and culture. We envision a sustainable global economy as a network of Local Living Economies, building long-term economic empowerment and prosperity in communities through local business ownership, economic justice, cultural diversity and a healthy natural environment. Independent businesses create wealth by engaging local people in the production, marketing, and consumption of goods, they pay taxes, and reinvest in our communities. Video produced as part of campaign by the cut company: http://www.thecutcompany.com
Просмотров: 323 cutcoECO