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Continents of the World | First and Second Grade Social Studies For Kids
 
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https://www.patreon.com/homeschoolpop The continents of the world are the subject of this Homeschool Pop first and second grade social studies curriculum video for your kids. Learn each of the continents one by one, learning where they are in the world and a little bit about each one. After the lesson, there is a brief quiz to make sure the kids have indeed learned the continents of the world! Thanks for watching this continents of the world Homeschool Pop video! Feel free to subscribe, comment below or visit us online at http://homeschoolpop.com Continents of the World | First and Second Grade Social Studies For Kids continents of the world continents for kids first grade social studies second grade social studies Homeschool Pop Continents of the World First and Second Grade Social Studies for kids
Просмотров: 188854 Homeschool Pop
Indigenous Pedagogy - 8 Ways of Pedagogy
 
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This video is about Indigenous Pedagogy - 8 Ways of Learning References: 8 Aboriginal Ways of Learning, (n.d.). In 8way.wikispaces, Retrieved May 20, 2016, from http://8ways.wikispaces.com/ Board of Studies NSW,. (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: Revised edition 2008. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. (2015). Closing the Gap: Prime Minister’s Report 2015. Retrieved from https://www.dpmc.gov.au/sites/default/files/publications/Closing_the_Gap_2015_Report.pdf Donovan, M. (2009). Quality Teaching and Aboriginal student, a NSW model. Journal Of Australian Indigenous Issues, 12(1-4), 104-115. Retrieved from https://library.newcastle.edu.au/articles/3152526.37841/1.PDF Donovan, M. (2015). Aboriginal student stories, the missing voice to guide us towards change. The Australian Educational Researcher, 42(5), 613-625. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13384-015-0182-3 Dreise, T., & Thomson, S. (2014). Unfinished business: PISA shows Indigenous youth are being left behind ACER Occasional Essays (Vol. February 2014). Fraser, A., & Hewitt, K., (2004). Aina is the textbook: Good Indigenous pedagogy speaks of country as that which sustains and establishes the foundation of knowledge, in PASE conference 7th May 2004, New York Garner, C. (2011, September 12). TEDxDarwin – Chris Garner – Transforming the Teacher in Indigenous Education [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMfBeotD8gc Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs. (n.d.). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan 2010-2014. Melbourne. Retrieved from http://scseec.edu.au/site/DefaultSite/filesystem/documents/ATSI%20documents/ATSIEAP_web_version_final.pdf Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. Melbourne: Retrieved from http://www.curriculum.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf Yunkaporta, T. (n.d.). Draft Report for DET on Indigenous Research Project conducted by Tyson Yunkaporta, Aboriginal Education Consultant, in Western NSW Region Schools, 2007-2009: Aboriginal
Просмотров: 8936 Bec Ardern
Grade 6 Lesson Plan on Indigenous Identity
 
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Просмотров: 144 Danah Faux
CURRICULUM HAUL | NATIVE AMERICAN UNIT STUDY
 
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I debated whether I should have a separate unit for Native American Indians because the stories and history of the Native Americans spans the whole history of the US. This is a small compilation of supplies that would stand alone as a unit, but what would be more authentic is to distribute these materials over all our other American History unit, as currently each unit only has a little bit of relevant Native American material. While most of these supplies came from Rainbow Resource, there are a few books that were hand-me-down. Our Indian Fire Drill was purchased many years ago (possibly from a museum gift shop), but looks like something a crafter or woodworker could make. Find the complete list of materials we are using for all our American history units this year by checking out the blog post that accompanies this video playlist: https://www.pepperandpine.com/?p=2926 American history curriculum haul playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlJU1f8WALE&list=PLJxUV0rOnlxxTWx_yJaOue7RH1gKhJP0A Share pics of your projects with me! https://twitter.com/PepperandPine https://www.instagram.com/pepperandpine/ https://www.facebook.com/pepperandpine https://www.pepperandpine.com
Просмотров: 1862 Pepper and Pine
Campus To Community - American Indian Studies & Service Learning
 
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Guest: Dr. Jane Haladay, Dept. of American Indian Studies Host: Hannah Baggott-Anderson, Lecturer in English and Faculty Fellow in the Literacy Commons copyright 2018 The University of North Carolina at Pembroke
Просмотров: 43 WNCP TV
French and Indian War
 
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This PowerPoint, with activities, and lesson plans are available @: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-And-Social-Studies-Academy This lesson teaches students about the French and Indian War, with a focus on causes and consequences. Students will review how European competition for colonies, fueled by the economic theory of mercantilism, set the stage for a showdown between France and Great Britain over North America. Comparisons are provided of how the differing missions of these two nations in the way they settled North America demonstrate Native Americans likely willingness to help the French succeed: French fur trappers with a small population and trading alliances with the Natives - English settlement of the 13 Colonies with a hunger for land for agricultural use. Students will learn about the involvement of the following major players in the conflict: George Washington, General Wolfe, and William Pitt. The following events and content are also covered: Fort Duquesne, Fort Necessity, Albany Congress & Plan of Union, Siege of Louisburg, capture of Quebec, the Treaty of Paris, Pontiac’s War, and the Proclamation Act of 1763. The consequences of the conflict are a focus of this lesson. Students will learn about how losing the French as an ally led to Pontiac’s War / Rebellion. How the Albany Congress would set the tone for colonial cooperation in rising revolutionary calls against the British. And most importantly how the taxes placed on the colonies as a result of England’s debt would lead to the “Road to the American Revolution.” Like most of the videos on Mr. Raymond’s Civics and Social Studies Academy’s lessons, this video ends with a review “quiz.” Remember that the PowerPoint in this video as well as a variety of lesson plans, worksheets, smartboard files and activities, are available at Teachers Pay Teachers. As a social studies teacher, I have often looked for good YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. All content in this video is for educational purposes only… ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Native American Cultures (1491-1607) - (APUSH Period 1 / APUSH Chapter 1)
 
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http://www.tomrichey.net This video lesson for US History students summarizes the key characteristics of the cultures of the major Native American people groups in North America (Arctic, Plains, Northeast/Great Lakes, Southwest, Southeast) the time of European contact. Native American tribes had a variety of different lifestyles that were influenced by the environment on different sections of the North American continent. The new AP US History curriculum places greater emphasis on history prior to 1607. This lecture was designed to familiarize students with this material, which has not been covered in-depth in most classrooms in the past. This lecture aligns with APUSH Key Concept 1.1 and should appear in chapter 1 in most APUSH textbooks. Key Concept 1.1: As native populations migrated and settled across the vast expanse of North America over time, they developed distinct and increasingly complex societies by adapting to and transforming their diverse environments. Special thanks to Knowledge Quest Maps for letting me use a few of their maps! Please visit their website: http://www.knowledgequestmaps.com
Просмотров: 222416 Tom Richey
13 Colonies: Colonial Governments & English Influence
 
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This PowerPoint, with activities, and lesson plans are available @: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-And-Social-Studies-Academy This lesson teaches students about colonial governments in the 13 Colonies. Students will learn about the English influences on colonial governments including: The Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, representative democracy, and English Common Law. Students will also be introduced to The Enlightenment and how philosophers like John Locke, Montesquieu, & Rousseau influenced the Founding Fathers. Students will learn how the earliest settlers took these ideas and put them into practice with the Mayflower Compact and the House of Burgesses. We will look at how colonial governments were controlled by the king and parliament with a look at the different types of colonies and colonial governments: Royal, Charter, and Proprietary and the impact this had on the colonist’s access to self-government and democratic principles. Students will finally learn about the importance of Town Meetings and the rising tensions with the British. Like most of the videos on Mr. Raymond’s Civics and Social Studies Academy’s lessons, this video ends with a review “quiz.” Remember that the PowerPoint in this video as well as a variety of lesson plans, worksheets, smartboard files and activities, are available at Teachers Pay Teachers. As a social studies teacher, I have often looked for good YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. All content in this video is for educational purposes only… ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Brenda Child - American Indian Studies Faculty
 
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For more information about the American Indian Studies department, visit http://amin.umn.edu
Просмотров: 768 LATIS Video Services
IELTS – The 5 Step Study Plan
 
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If you're going to take IELTS, start here! Your success on the IELTS is based on more than just practicing English skills. In this video, I'll show you the key steps you need to take to reach your target band score. I'll talk about setting your objectives, building your studying plan, and studying for each section of the exam. Many students get a low score on the IELTS and keep making the same mistakes over and over again. Save your time and your money by avoiding their mistakes. Watch this video and get it right the first time. Take the quiz to make sure: http://www.engvid.com/ielts-the-5-step-study-plan/ For grammar and writing help, you can also visit my site: http://www.WriteToTop.com For many more free lessons on IELTS preparation you can visit: http://www.engvid.com/english-exams/ielts/ For a free complete guide to the IELTS, go to: http://www.GoodLuckIELTS.com TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today we're going to look at an IELTS study plan, and as usual, when I look at IELTS, or TOEFL, or any of the tests, I'm going to speak a little bit faster so those of you taking the test can get a little bit more listening practice. And everybody else, this is very good practice for you as well to listen to slightly faster English. So we're going to look at IELTS. And for those of you who are just starting to prepare, starting to think about taking this test, maybe you want to go to university, maybe it's for immigration purposes, whatever, you're just starting out, you've just signed up for the test, now you need to start preparing for it. So here's a five-point study plan. And number one is the most important part because... And I'll tell you in a minute why. Know the test. Now, what does this mean? It means that you have to know exactly what you're about to face. I've met many test takers who've taken the test maybe several times, and the first two or three times they got a really low score because they still didn't really know what was coming. Right? They didn't understand how the test is structured, what the timing is like, all of these things. So, know the test, means: Know the structure. There are four sections; listening, reading, writing, speaking. Make sure you know how each of them works, how much time is going to be used for each one. In the listening section you have four sections, in the reading section you have three passages to read, in the writing sections you have... Section you have two tasks that you have to complete. In the speaking section you're going to be speaking with a native English speaker face to face, one on one for about 12 to 15 minutes. Make sure you know exactly what they're going to be asking you, what you're going to be expected to answer back. Okay? So know the structure of the test. Know the timing. You have 40 minutes, roughly, for the listening section, including a 10-minute time allotment for copying your answers from the question sheet to an answer sheet. This is very, very important. Know what to do that. If you're finished writing your answers on your answer sheet before the 10 minutes are up, you can't go to the reading section. You have to sit and wait, close your eyes, relax, etc. Make sure you know the question types that you're going to face in the listening, and the reading, and the writing of course, and the speaking. Knowing the question types will make sure that you aren't surprised by anything. Okay? You do not want to have surprises on test day. Know the question types, prepare for them, begin to think about how to answer them. Okay? Make sure you know all the directions. Every section of the test will have its own set of directions. Do not spend time reading these or listening to these during the test. You should know all of the directions long beforehand, you should memorize them. That way, you don't spend time reading them, you go straight to the task at hand. Okay? So know the test very well. Now, the best way to actually know the test is to practice taking the test. Practice the test. Now, I don't mean do, like, 10 minutes here, 10 minutes there, 15 minutes here. I want you to sit down at least once a week from the time you registered or started thinking about it until the actual test day. There are lots of places where you can get full practice tests. The Cambridge books are excellent for that. They are past papers and they're real tests. Make sure that you do a full test at least once a week from beginning to the end. Give yourself three full hours undistracted. Now, what does this mean? When you go to the official test centre you cannot take your phone in with you. You do not have internet, you do not have music, you do not have anything. You have you in a room with a bunch of other people.
Live English Class | Complete Lesson | Teaching 3 and 4 Year Old Children | ESL | EFL
 
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Hello Everyone! In this video, I am teaching a kindergarten class of about 25 students. This is a live, unedited, English class for 3 and 4 year old Japanese children. I meet with these students about 3 times a month. In this English class, we are learning: A greetings song (I'm good, great, wonderful, hungry, tired, not so good). What's your name song. The alphabet song. Clothing and Colors. Numbers song (1-10). Clothing pattern: A skirt. It's a skirt. The songs I'm using here are from: Dream English: https://www.youtube.com/user/DreamEnglishKids Super Simple Songs: https://www.youtube.com/user/SuperSimpleSongs My videos are vocabulary-based for conversation practice. Each video is themed to provide context for learning. To insure success, every video is designed with open slots for vocabulary substitution practice. These patterns allow students to practice on their own and teachers can have their class practice together as a group. These videos also work great for icebreakers and class discussions. Please have fun and speak English now! Thank you for your kind support :) Mark Kulek Here are my T-Shirts / Coffee Mug: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/100051466?noCache=true Here are my Conversation Cards: http://www.englishbooks.jp/catalog/index.php/MSC-Press-m-147 Here are my ebooks: 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume One: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MT6OZ54 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume Two: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B014MN7ESQ For those of you who are interested in teaching English to young learners. Please have a look at my blog: Sharing My Whiteboard. http://sharingmywhiteboard.blogspot.jp Thank you for your support. #EnglishSpeakingPractice
Просмотров: 418305 Mark Kulek
HOMESCHOOL CURRICULUM REVIEW | SCIENCE UNIT STUDY
 
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I think this Butterflies and Caterpillars unit was one of our favorite units this year. Well, at least I know it was mine. For my children, because there was little writing and a lot of hands-on activities, I think I can safely say they liked it too. We used a number of resources for this unit, though most of them were reference materials that we referred to rather than reading from cover to cover. There are some favorite and not-so-favorite resources, and I hope to give you a fair review of the materials we used so you can best chose the supplies you need for your units. What I forgot to show was our lesson plan I created at the beginning of this unit which I showed in the video sharing our plans and resources for this unit. For pictures of the lesson plan, and what we accomplished, you can head to my website to the blog post that accompanies this video: If you want to see the other projects we did for this unit, you can check out the complete playlist here: Many of my DK Eyewitness books found a new home right here on YouTube. You can check out Kristy's unboxing video here: https://youtu.be/ayDOAmQ5ySw?t=1m44s Find me here: https://twitter.com/PepperandPine https://www.instagram.com/pepperandpine/ https://www.facebook.com/pepperandpine https://www.pepperandpine.com
Просмотров: 2540 Pepper and Pine
Business English Course - Lesson 1 - Essential Job Vocabulary
 
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Take a free sample lesson of the Business English Course: http://www.espressoenglish.net/lesson-1-essential-job-vocabulary/ Want to get ALL 30 of the Business English Course lessons? Register here - http://www.espressoenglish.net/business-english-course/ Welcome to Lesson 1 of the Business English Course -- Essential Job Vocabulary. Let's begin by answering the question, "Where do you work?" This seems like a simple question, but there are many ways to answer it: I work at... I work in... I work for... I work with... You're going to learn when to use each preposition, as well as some key English vocabulary regarding work and jobs.
Просмотров: 536785 Espresso English
The Story of the Pilgrims for Kids: A brief history of Pilgrims and the first Thanksgiving
 
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The story of the Pilgrims for Kids will give you a brief history of the Pilgrims and the first Thanksgiving. It all happened about 400 years ago, there was a group of travelers who came to America in search of religious freedom. They wanted to worship God in their own way in England, but they were not permitted. Instead, they boarded ships and went on a journey. These people are referred to as the Pilgrims. The Pilgrims left Europe for America on September 20, 1620, and established a colony called Plymouth. A colony is an area set up by a group of people who have usually traveled from the same country. It is a place where they settle to live, work, and raise their families. Although the Pilgrims were happy to have settled in America, they faced a difficult and cold winter. They were not prepared. They built a large house and some smaller homes, but for a period of time people still slept on the Mayflower. Many of the Pilgrims died during the winter and of the 102 people who came across the Atlantic Ocean only 47 were still alive. There were Native Americans living in the same area as the Pilgrims. Native Americans are the people who were already living on the land before the Pilgrims arrived in what is now known as America. They established a peace treaty with the Pilgrims. The Native Americans also agreed to trade for animal furs. Some of the Native Americans also chose to stay with the Pilgrims and taught them how to plant corn, hunt, fish, and how to survive the cold winter. After the first harvest in 1621, the Pilgrims invited some of the Native Americans to join them for a feast. Sometimes this is referred to as the first Thanksgiving as the tradition continued after every harvest in the years that followed. View our video "The First Thanksgiving" that coincides with this video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EZNCuQkWNU Would you like more resources about Pilgrims and Thanksgiving? Click the link below to be taken to our detailed lesson plans with great ideas for teaching elementary aged students. Pilgrims Lesson Plan: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/lesson-plans/the-pilgrims/ Thanksgiving Lesson Plan: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/lesson-plans/thanksgiving-origins/ ------ We want to thank you for following Clarendon Learning! Our mission at Clarendon learning is to support the education of America’s youth. We strive to create bright futures for children across the country by supporting teachers and parents by developing and providing high-quality lesson plans, videos, and other teaching resources for FREE! We are constantly developing new videos and teaching resources so subscribe to our channel to be notified! You can also find us here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClarendonLearning/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ClarendonLRNG Website: https://clarendonlearning.org/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ClarendonLearning ----- Are you an elementary teacher or homeschooling parent looking for free resources you can trust? We are here to help! We don’t only provide video content but we also provide high-quality lesson plans as well. 100% free with handouts, worksheets, classroom activities and more! To learn more click the links below: Language Arts Lesson Plans: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/subject/language-arts-lesson-plans/ Math Lesson Plans: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/subject/math-lesson-plans/ Reading Lesson Plans: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/subject/reading-lesson-plans/ Science Lesson Plans: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/subject/science-lesson-plans/ Social Studies Lesson Plans: https://www.clarendonlearning.org/subject/social-studies-lesson-plans/ ----- We love supporting teachers and parents in all of the ways that we can. We hope you enjoy! Thank you for your support.
Просмотров: 73136 Clarendon Learning
How to Talk About Your Free Time and Hobbies in English - Spoken English Lesson
 
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What do you like doing in your free time? Do you have any interesting hobbies? Talking about free time and hobbies is a good way to start a conversation in English, or find things in common when you speak to others in English. By the end of this lesson, you’ll be able to talk naturally and clearly in English about your free time and hobbies. See the full lesson (with text) here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-time-and-hobbies You can learn: - English vocabulary to talk about hobbies and free time activities. - How to say what you like or dislike doing. - How to make your speaking more natural and interesting by adding details. - Ways to talk about how often you do these free time activities. - How to make longer answers when talking about your free time in English. See more of our free English lessons here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons
Просмотров: 1911852 Oxford Online English
How to teach Kids  | from a Prague kindergarten, part 1 | English for Children
 
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How to manage 15+ Czech five year old kids in your classroom, if you only speak English? It´s easy, no worries. You need a clear and structured lesson plan, you need to be a leader and you need to show a big warm smile. Use body language too and you will succeed. Children love to be surprised, entertained, they love physical activities and once you do all of it, you can introduce and drill any language you like, even comparatives.
Просмотров: 8327194 WATTSENGLISH
One State-Many Nations -- Prehistoric Ohioans
 
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One State-Many Nations: Native Americans of Ohio studies the rich cultural and historical heritage of the Native American nations that have populated Ohio since prehistoric times. Produced in 2004. Prehistoric Ohioans -- They came to our state more than 12,000 years ago. Some believe they crossed a land bridge from Siberia to Alaska and migrated south. Prehistoric Ohioans looks at the Paleo, Archaic, Adena, Hopewell, Whittlesey and Fort Ancient peoples. See who lived, hunted, gathered, farmed and built mysterious mounds in Ohio. Get lesson plans One State-Many Nations: Native Americans of Ohio at http://www.westernreservepublicmedia.org/onestate
Просмотров: 22578 WesternReservePBS
EDUC 526: Native American Unit Plan Presentation
 
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This is a video presentation of the Unit Plan I created for my M.A. in Education Digital Teaching and Learning.
Просмотров: 126 Megan Reeves
One State-Many Nations -- Historic Native Americans
 
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One State-Many Nations: Native Americans of Ohio studies the rich cultural and historical heritage of the Native American nations that have populated Ohio since prehistoric times. Produced in 2004. Historic Native Americans -- What was daily life like for Ohio's historic Native Americans? What did they eat? How did they dress? What were their houses like? The answers depend on where people lived and what their tribal traditions were. Historic Native Americans shows how our ancestors used the gifts the Creator gave them to feed, clothe and house their families. Get lesson plans for One State-Many Nations: Native Americans of Ohio at http://www.westernreservepublicmedia.org/onestate
Просмотров: 15206 WesternReservePBS
Talking About Your Vacation in English - Spoken English Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn how to talk about your vacation in English. Talking about holidays and vacations is a great way to improve your English conversation. Where did you go for your last holiday? What did you do there? Did you have a good time? In this lesson, you’ll learn how to answer these questions and more in clear, natural English. See the full version of this free lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/talking-about-your-vacation This lesson will help you learn: - Ways to basic information about your vacation. - How to describe what you did on vacation. - About describing where you went on holiday. - How to talk about what you liked on vacation. - Different ways to describe what you disliked on vacation. - To make longer answers about your holiday. To see more free English lessons like this, visit: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/ A big thank you to the Alphabet translation team from Syria for the Arabic captions!
Просмотров: 695775 Oxford Online English
Tribes of Montana
 
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Instructional Video for Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum---The first state-endorsed curriculum to be aligned with Common Core Standards. Since Time Immemorial: Tribal Sovereignty in Washington State is easy to implement — all lesson plans and materials are online and free. Since its launch in 2010.
Learn English in 3 Hours - ALL You Need to Master English Conversation
 
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This 3 hours of English topics WILL make your English sound more natural! If you want to study more, click here: https://goo.gl/48uDNw and learn English in the most efficient way. ↓ More details below ↓ Step 1: Go to https://goo.gl/48uDNw Step 2: Sign up for a Free Lifetime Account - No money, No credit card required Step 3: Start learning English the fast, fun and easy way! With this video compilation you'll be able to master English conversation in 3 hours! You've decided to start learning English, so let's improve your conversation skills! In this video, you'll learn 3 hours of casual conversation topics, with great examples and tips. This video will give you amazing insights into how to sound more natural and understand all kinds of references you WON'T learn from a text book. Our hosts express themselves in simple English, with English subtitles. This video will challenge your listening comprehension skills and help you progress in your English study. Let us help you through this 3 hour English topics compilation! This is the fastest, easiest way to pick up conversational English! Follow and write to us using hashtag #EnglishClass101 - Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/EnglishClass101 - Google Plus : https://plus.google.com/+EnglishClass101 - Twitter : https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101 - Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.com/EnglishPod Click here to get started with the English language: https://goo.gl/48uDNw Also, please LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on our videos! We really appreciate it. Thanks!
Просмотров: 3229676 Learn English with EnglishClass101.com
How to change Basic English into Business English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to get that job? Improve your image? Sound more professional? Learn how to transform simple English words to business English vocabulary and watch your career take off! I'll show you how to change "get" to "receive", " make sure" to "ensure", "give more information" to "elaborate", and more. These small vocabulary changes will make a huge difference in your English level. Test yourself on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-change-basic-english-into-business-english/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. My name is Rebecca from www.engvid.com. Today, you're going to learn how to speak more professionally in business situations. Now, at times, it's all right to use informal language. It's acceptable in everyday situations. But there are times when you'll want to create a more powerful impression. And at that time, you'll want to be able to use business English. What's the difference between general English and business English? Well, sometimes, there's not very much difference. Sometimes, general English is used in business contexts. But sometimes, you use a higher-level word. And that's what I'm going to teach you in this lesson. Let's look at some really easy, common examples. For example, if you say -- or if you want to say, "I got your email", in regular English, you might just say, "I got your email." What would you say if you want to make it business English? You would say -- I'm giving you a clue. The word starts with R. Instead of saying, "I got your email"; "I received your email." Okay? Now, it becomes more formal and more business-like. Suppose you want to tell someone, "I need your help" or, "I need some help." What word could you use that starts with R instead of "need"? "Require." So instead of saying -- and you can also change more than the verb. The verb is the key, but you could say -- instead of saying, "I need some help", you could say, "I require some assistance." Now, you've changed two words, the verb and also a noun. Let's try another one. "Let's talk about it later." Which business word could you use? "Let's discuss -- let's discuss it later." That sounds much more professional than saying, "Let's talk about it later." Next one. "How do I get in touch with her?" What word could you use instead of that? "How do I contact her?" Okay? Good. "Please make sure you arrive on time." Which business word could you use instead of "make sure"? "Please ensure you arrive on time." "Please give her your travel plans." Instead of saying "give", you could say, "Please provide her with your itinerary." There, we've changed another word. Instead of saying "travel plan" or "travel plans", you could use the word "itinerary". An "itinerary" is usually a piece of paper or a document that lists your travel plans, when you're departing, when you're arriving, where, when, and so on. "Please let them know when you will be arriving." "Please let them know" -- instead of that, you could say, "Please inform them of your arrival." Okay? Good. "Please tell me why you've made this decision." "Please explain your decision." "Could you please talk some more about that subject?" "Could you please elaborate? Could you please elaborate on that." Now, this is actually a very useful word if you go to a conference or a meeting and you want someone to speak some more about a particular point or issue. It's a good, kind of, question to learn. "Could you please elaborate on that?" So "to elaborate" means to speak more or talk more, give more information. "How are you going to fix this problem?" Better than using the word "fix" is the word "solve". "How are you going to solve this problem?" All right? So try to do that for every simple word that you know and basic word that you know in general English, try to find a slightly more formal version, which will be your business English word. And use these words in an office environment. If you've found this helpful, please subscribe to my channel on YouTube. And if you'd like to do a quiz on this subject, you can also go to our website, www.engvid.com. Thanks very much. Good luck with your English.
Просмотров: 1315840 Learn English with Rebecca [engVid]
One State-Many Nations -- Native Americans Today
 
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One State-Many Nations: Native Americans of Ohio studies the rich cultural and historical heritage of the Native American nations that have populated Ohio since prehistoric times. Produced in 2004. Native Americans Today -- Wherever you look in Ohio, you still find the influence of Native Americans. Native American influences have become part of the modern fabric of Ohio. Look at the names of cities, counties, parks and rivers. Look at our sports teams. Native Americans Today also looks at stereotypes of Native Americans that exist today. Get lesson plans for One State-Many Nations: Native Americans of Ohio at http://www.westernreservepublicmedia.org/onestate
Просмотров: 10285 WesternReservePBS
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Просмотров: 13992833 LastWeekTonight
Native Americans- VA SOL 2.2
 
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I created this video to be used with the Virginia history SOL 2.2. It reviews the lives and contributions of the Powhatan, Sioux, and Pueblo tribes.
Просмотров: 80857 Christina C
Child welfare services to be taken over by Indigenous governments
 
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The federal government plans to hand over control of child welfare services to Indigenous governments in an effort to drive down the large number of Indigenous children in foster care. To read more: http://cbc.ca/1.4927104 »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: http://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1sA5P9H For breaking news on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1WjDyks Follow CBC News on Instagram: http://bit.ly/1Z0iE7O Download the CBC News app for iOS: http://apple.co/25mpsUz Download the CBC News app for Android: http://bit.ly/1XxuozZ »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.
Просмотров: 3652 CBC News
Think Indigenous 5 Colby Tootoosis_March_19_2015
 
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Colby Tootoosis, Youth Spokesperson, Headman Poundmaker
Просмотров: 2077 Usask
ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION AND ACCENT TRAINING: Detailed Analysis of American speech | Rachel’s English
 
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You can improve your pronunciation and accent using the in-depth exercise that I’ve presented for you here. In fact, I’ve been using these Ben Franklin pronunciation speech analysis exercises for years to teach American English learners like you how to sound more like a native speaker, with a smooth and flowing American English accent. You can sound natural when speaking English and greatly increase your English comprehension with this detailed speech analysis. American English pronunciation is difficult because we speak quickly and with a uniquely American accent. I’ll show you all of the reductions, non-stressed words and linking tricks that make American English speakers sound the way they do—I’ll take the mystery out of what makes up the American accent! By doing a detailed analysis of this speech you’ll hear (and see!) the nuances of American English pronunciation and get an in-depth English comprehension lesson. Over the last 10 years of teaching, many of my most successful students have used Ben Franklin English pronunciation exercises extensively to sound more like a native American English speaker. The English pronunciation and listening tips presented here will be immediately useful to your studies and I hope you’ll use all of my Ben Franklin exercises presented in the following playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3g51xfopIE&list=PL27A5D7DE7D02373A And the apple pie recipe: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/recipe/salted-caramel-apple-pie-recipe-twenty-blackbirds-20904959 Sign up for Rachel's FREE 10-day mini-course in Accent Reduction and mailing list: http://www.RachelsEnglish.com/newsletter New to Rachel's English? Where to Start Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrqHrGoMJdTRwaQFCCDp4G88yX5D3gOdP Get Rachel's Book: http://RachelsEnglish.com/book SUBSCRIBE!: http://bit.ly/RE_sub, Fan! http://bit.ly/RE_FB Follow! http://www.twitter.com/Rachels_English Improve your American Accent / spoken English at Rachel's English with video-based lessons and exercises. Rachel uses real life English conversation as the basis for teaching how to speak English and how to sound American -- improve listening comprehension skills. Study English vocabulary and English phrases such as phrasal verbs, as well as common expressions in English. Learn American idioms and American slang. Cải thiện nói tiếng Anh Mỹ / 改善美式英語的發音 / 미국 영어 발음 향상 / アメリカ英語の話し言葉のアクセントを向上させる / Улучшение произношения американского английского языка / Meningkatkan berbicara bahasa Inggris Amerika / Melhore sua pronúncia do inglês americano / Mejora tu pronunciación en Inglés Americano / बात अमेरिकी अंग्रेजी में सुधार تحسين لهجتك الأمريكية الإنجليزية / שפר את המבטא האמריקאי שלך / Améliorez votre prononciation en anglais américain / Migliora la tua pronuncia in inglese americano ...with Rachel's English!
Просмотров: 33180 Rachel's English
American Indian Lesson - Mike Ojibway
 
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Mr. Ojibway taught third graders about his Red Cliff Ojibwe culture.
Просмотров: 149 Joel Raney
The History of Colonial America
 
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The video describes characteristics of the the three main groups of the 13 colonies: New England, Middle and Southern. Students will learn about geography, education, religion, economic systems, social patterns, and treatment and enslavement of African-Americans in the regions. Check out all the educational videos from Flocabulary, often called the "Schoolhouse Rock" of the 21st Century, at http://flocabulary.com For lesson plans and activities that go along with this video, visit https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/colonial-america/ Connect With Us! Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/flocabulary Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/flocabulary Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/flocabulary Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/flocabulary Beat by KEISHH
Просмотров: 398965 Flocabulary
How to Stop Translating in Your Head and Start Thinking in English Like a Native
 
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Stop translating in your head and speak fluent, natural English without hesitations. See the FULL lesson on the blog: http://bit.ly/2Ts72yk Start reading the English Fluency Formula ebook with a FREE sample: http://bit.ly/2PDymf4 In conversations and other situations where you need to be able to process information quickly and respond immediately, translating in your head is a big problem. It slows you down. It makes you hesitate. At times you’ll completely miss out on the conversation because your chance to jump in has come and gone and you’re still trying to translate. On top of all that, a lot of slang, idioms and phrasal verbs can be difficult to translate quickly — if at all! It’s really best for your fluency if you stop translating in your head and learn to start thinking in English. Thinking in English is very important to developing your fluency in English… so let’s go! Here are my nine tips for thinking in English. DO DAILY ACTIVITIES IN ENGLISH Can you change your phone settings to English? How about talking to your pet in English when you’re going for a walk? If you commute to work by train or bus could you buy your fare in English? LISTEN TO MORE ENGLISH FOR IMMERSION WITH NATIVE SPEAKERS Turn on the internet radio, download podcasts, put Netflix or YouTube on in the background while you’re doing your chores or work! Your brain is so amazing that it will begin to recognize patterns and want to follow them too! TRY GUESSING OR PLANNING WHAT ENGLISH SPEAKERS ARE GOING TO SAY When you predict the conversation based on experience, you’ll be more confident and ready to respond. Imagine the conversations that you want to have in the future and create them before they happen so you feel more prepared. It may not go word-for-word how you plan it, so be ready for change. You could write the conversation down and practice it a few times. STOP LEARNING EXCLUSIVELY THROUGH TRANSLATION Observe, watch, hear, smell and relate vocabulary directly to its meaning — not the word in your first language. USE A MONOLINGUAL DICTIONARY A bilingual dictionary is good for one thing — to put your coffee cup on so it doesn’t leave rings on your table. LABEL OBJECTS IN YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE IN ENGLISH You can do this in your mind or actually on pieces of paper taped to the objects (or use sticky notes). Start with everyday objects that you use every day! For example, if I have a book at home and I am learning Portuguese I would label it “livro,” or if I am learning Arabic then I would label it “kitab.” Every time I look at it I am reminded to think that word! TALK TO YOURSELF IN ENGLISH Ask yourself questions and answer them. Make up a short story about a person you see on your way to work. You may want to do this in private when no one else is within earshot. It’s ok if you are not sure if your grammar is perfect, or if you make a mistake. No one will know! If you’re not sure if what you said to yourself is correct or not, then make a note to yourself to find out! You can do some research online, or ask your teacher or a native speaker friend later. JUST START THINKING IN ENGLISH WITH A MANTRA Even the smallest effort is better than nothing. Start with a mantra, or motto, that will help you get started each day in English. For example, “My English is getting better each day.” THINK A LITTLE MORE IN ENGLISH EACH DAY Start small. Make it a habit to think in English a little each day. Set an alarm if it’s hard to remember to switch into English. Then use the timer on your phone or computer to 1 minute to start and think only in English for that amount of time. It doesn’t matter what you think about, or even if you just say a few of the same phrases over and over. See if you can extend the time each day by 30 seconds! Social media: FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/gonaturalenglish TWITTER: http://twitter.com/gonaturaleng My email: info@GoNaturalEnglish.com
Просмотров: 6151108 Go Natural English by Gabby Wallace
English conversation Lesson -  1st Day at the University ( Speaking about University life)
 
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English conversation Lesson - 1st Day at the University ( Speaking about University life) Blog : http://www.learnex.in/english-conversation-lesson-university-life If you are studying in the university, entering a university or are interested to know about my two friends at the university then continue watching this Spoken English lesson. I am your English Teacher Michelle and we are going to learn how to talk to new ESL students at the university. This is one of the earliest English conversations between Billy and Jack at the university. When they first met each other the conversation was quite formal and introductory and so would it be, if you also meet your classmate/college mate for the first time at the university. Website : http://www.letstalkpodcast.com Facebook : http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast Conversation 01 Billy – Hey! My name is Billy, What about you? Jack – My name is Jack, where do you come from? Billy – I come from Southern California, what about you? Jack – I am from Huston, Texas. Ahah! That’s Nice. So, what year are you studying in? Billy – I’m a freshman, what about you? Jack – This is my first year too. Billy – Oh Oh! Okay …Nice to know. Conversation 02 Billy – Hey! Jack, do you know what you plan to major in? Jack – Yeah ! Initially, I thought political science, but now I’m leaning in towards English literature. What about you? Billy - I plan to majoring in Social work." Freshman/ fresher is used for a person who is in the1st year of college, Sophomore -2nd year, Junior -3rd year and Senior -4th year of college Conversation 03 Billy – Why did you decide to join this school Jack? Jack – Well! For me either it was this school or the school next to my home and I simply wanted to get away from home. So I joined this university. What about you? Billy – I researched a bit and I found out that this university has everything to offer that I need . Jack – Oh! That ways…. Synonyms for College: Uni/ University/ Undergraduate or Graduate school Conversation 04 Billy – Hey! So are you staying at the dormitory? Jack – Yes, I ‘m over at the Terry Hall, what about you? Billy – No, I’m not. I am commuting from home, as I have an apartment right next to the school. Jack – Oh! That’s quite interesting. Dormitory -A building, as at a college, containing a number of private orsemiprivate rooms for residents, usually along with common bathroom facilities and recreation areas. Commuting from home – travelling from home Conversation 05 Billy - Hey! Jack, how many credits are you taking this semester? Jack - I’m taking 10 credits, what about you, Lemme guess you must be taking 16 credits. Billy – Ahah! You are near, I’m taking 20 credits… Semester- A half-year term in a school or university. Credits – A course credit (often credit hour, or just credit or "unit") is a unit that gives weight to the value, level or time requirements of an academic course taken at a school or other educational institution. Conversation 06 Jack – Hey! Billy, it was really nice talking to you. I think it’s time we go home. Billy – Hey! Jack, It was nice talking to you too as well and let’s hangout soon tomorrow probably. Jack – I will see you later, thank you for your time… Ba bye. You know what this is not the end of their conversation – after this they became really good friends and talked about everything from professors to grades. If you want to know the rest of the story then I suggest you do watch my next English lesson on University Life.
HOW TO DO AN OCEAN UNIT STUDY
 
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It's time to start a new unit and this time around I'm writing my own main lesson block for a study on the ocean. Ocean study is broad, so I'm focusing our work on local coastal plant and animal life, tide pool, tides, the Native American Indians of the region, and the explorers who first discovered the Pacific coast. I've made this main lesson block both broad and specific, encompassing science, history, geometry and poetry. Though I've shown you many resources and materials I'll be using for this unit, I have not shown you the poetry books, audio books, novels and history books I'll be using. For a complete list of topics being covered and the lesson plans for this unit, you can find them on Homeschool Panda http://www.homeschoolpanda.com on September 6, 2017. The curriculum for this unit may be available for purchase via my website. For updates on the release, please visit this page and sign up for the mailing list: https://www.pepperandpine.com/?page_id=3822 See the complete playlist for this Ocean Main Lesson Block: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGwNg3Be_qg&list=PLJxUV0rOnlxxxpcxNPkpG98xZrCEn3jX0 Complete Playlist on how we use Distress Inks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33LKs3oyemw&list=PLJxUV0rOnlxzobX89g6VmPAMTvDJNCQNh Share pics of your projects with me! https://twitter.com/PepperandPine https://www.instagram.com/pepperandpine/ https://www.facebook.com/pepperandpine https://www.pepperandpine.com
Просмотров: 2566 Pepper and Pine
How Can You Learn English Alone? Self-Study Plan! Ask Alisha
 
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You've got questions about life in the United States, American culture, or any English related questions you don’t want to sift through textbooks for the answer? https://goo.gl/vJX2vW Ask Alisha now! ↓Check how below↓ To send your question to Alisha it’s simple and will take you less than 30 seconds. Step 1: Go to https://goo.gl/vJX2vW Step 2: Sign up for a Free Lifetime Account Step 3: Ask any question to Alisha and get your question answered in a video! In this video, Alisha answers 14 questions. - How do native speakers use "to have"? I have seen, I've, I have got. Formal and informal? - Can you explain "through," "thorough," "though," and "thought"? They sound similar. - What does "love to hate" mean? When can I use it? - When can I use "ever" in a present perect sentence? (Like "I have ever") - What does "dash" mean and when can we use it? - What's the difference between "several," "sundry," and "various"? - How do we use "well" before someone starts speaking, and "though" after they speak? - I want to study at home (self study). What should I do? - What does "uncountable" mean? - What's the difference between "look into my eyes" and "look me in the eye." - I like to take naps. I like to go for walks/I like to take a nap. I like to go for a walk. Difference? - How do we write a good paragraph? - Why is it called the present perfect tense if it refers to the past? - I would like to know how to use "down," "up," "off," "in," "on," and "out" after a verb and why it's necessary. Your favourite English teacher Alisha takes the questions you've been asking and lay them out in an easy-to-follow format. Turn those question marks into exclamation points and get on with your English study. Interact with Alisha to clear up any confusion you have or just satisfy your curiosity. Not only you’ll be able to send questions but also power up your language with your free lifetime account. Learning English is made easy for you. Follow and write to us for more free content: ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishClass101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101
Просмотров: 444361 Learn English with EnglishClass101.com
NATURE UNIT STUDY ON BEES & HONEY | HOMESCHOOL LESSON PLANNING | PLAN WITH ME
 
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It's nearly spring and that means we are putting our history units aside and welcoming spring with our nature units. We are kicking it off with this small unit study on Bees and Honey. I've set aside a week for this unit which includes two project kits we got from Nature Watch as well as a hands-on project from a the Honey Bees project book. Share pics of your projects with me! https://twitter.com/PepperandPine https://www.instagram.com/pepperandpine/ https://www.facebook.com/pepperandpine https://www.pepperandpine.com Music credits: Path to Follow by Jingle Punks courtesy of YouTube free music
Просмотров: 3572 Pepper and Pine
Native Americans  People of the Plains
 
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Просмотров: 327247 TheChamberlinChannel
The Natives and the English - Crash Course US History #3
 
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In which John Green teaches you about relations between the early English colonists and the native people the encountered in the New World. In short, these relations were poor. As soon as they arrived, the English were in conflict with the native people. At Jamestown, Captain John Smith briefly managed to get the colony on pretty solid footing with the local tribes, but it didn't last, and a long series of wars with the natives ensued. This pattern would continue in US history, with settlers pushing into native lands and pushing the inhabitants further west. In this episode, you'll learn about Wahunsunacawh (who the English called Powhatan), his daughter Pocahontas, King Philip's (aka Metacom) War, and the Mystic Massacre. By and large, the history of the Natives and the English was not a happy one, even Thanksgiving wasn't all it's cracked up to be. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The English tried and failed for a decade to establish a foothold in the New World in native territory, leading to the lost colony of Roanoke: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/settling-a-new-world-the-lost-colony-of-roanoke-island When Jamestown was finally established in Virginia in 1607, the local Powhatan tribes sought friendly relations with the settlers, which quickly deteriorated: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/chief-powhatan-s-address-to-captain-john-smith
Просмотров: 2753304 CrashCourse
Tlingit Music--Past, Present and Future: Ed Littlefield at TEDxSitka
 
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Ed Littlefield is a Tlingit Native of Southeast Alaska currently working on composing and arranging Native music from the Tlingit tradition. He studied percussion at the University of Idaho and has played in the Idaho-Washington Symphony, The Orion Trombone Quartet, Dallas Brass, the Jazz Police and many other professional groups in the Northwest. Ed has recently completed an album combining traditional Alaskan Native music with jazz, called "Walking Between Worlds," featuring the Native Jazz Quartet: Ed Littlefield (drums); Jason Marsalis (vibes); Christian Fabian (bass); and Reuel Lubag (piano). His talk focuses on this fusion and the possibilities it offers. About TEDx, x = independently organized event. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Просмотров: 4059 TEDx Talks
Behold, America! | Symposium | Part 5
 
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Patricia Kelly, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, Canada Measuring Here and There, or the Decentralization of American Art When influential art critic and curator Lucy Lippard staged 955,000 in Vancouver, BC in January 1970, she was acknowledging the international aspirations and interconnectivity of much American conceptual art. Participating artists such as Robert Smithson, Douglas Huebler, and Sol LeWitt, had, by this time, well established practices concerned with mapping and relationality. Lippard's push towards decentralization signaled a broader desire among contemporary artists and critics to increase opportunities for sustained intellectual and creative inquiry, to understand art practice from a global (rather than regional) perspective, and to expand networks of like-minded artists across national borders in often unexpected and creative ways. Using this exhibition as a point of departure, this paper will explore the circulation of artists between the US and the West Coast of Canada in the late 60s and early 70s, and its potentially destabilizing effect on American art history. Conversation with James Luna & Michael Hatt, Ph.D. Dr. Hatt is Professor in the History of Art at the University of Warwick, England Wang Dang Doodle Encounters, or Representing the Indian, Then and Now James Luna's practice has focused on cross-cultural, multicultural, and current cultural issues in contemporary American Indian society. He will present his most recent installation, which opened last month at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Luna will be joined by Michael Hatt to discuss his work in relation to art history, the representation of Native Americans in the past, and the ways in which that history is presented to the public. Deborah Butterfield Deborah Butterfield is a major American sculptor whose subject since the 1970s has been the horse. Butterfield earned an MFA from the University of California, Davis, and is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, from such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts. In this presentation, Butterfield will overview much of her career, from her college works to her current studio practice. Derrick Cartwright, Ph.D. Director of University Galleries and Professor of Practice, Art History at the University of San Diego Proliferating Participation: American Art Displays in Eras of Crisis Contemporary American museum culture is fraught with challenges. In the face of weakening public support, institutions today claim that they seek audience engagement as a key to maintaining relevance and achieving sustainability. This talk explores the ways that "participation" has often been held up as a virtue by American art exhibitions past and present. From Robert Henri's 1915 exhibition of Modern American Painting at the Panama California Exposition to ambitious projects, like Behold, America!, the stakes of encouraging new participatory practices have at once evolved and grown more urgent across the United States. www.TheSanDiegoMuseumofArt.org Video produced by Balboa Park Online Collaborative
Просмотров: 734 The San Diego Museum of Art
Talking About Your Job in English - Spoken English Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn how to talk about your job in English. Where do you work? What do you have to do in your job? What kind of company do you work for? In this class, you can learn how to answer questions like this about your job in clear, detailed English. See the full version of this free English lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/talking-about-job This lesson will help you: - Learn how to describe your job position in English. - Talk about the department you work in. - Learn how to say where you work. - Describe your job in more detail by talking about the company you work for. - Talk about your job in more detail. - Explain your job responsibilities and what you do at work. - Learn useful English phrases to say what you like or don't like about your job. - Put more details into your answer so you can make a longer answer about your job in English. - Prepare for an interview or exam where you have to talk about your job in English. See more of our free English lessons here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons A big thank you to the Alphabet translation team from Syria for the Arabic captions!
Просмотров: 482575 Oxford Online English
Articles -  a, an & the  -  English Grammar lesson
 
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Articles - a, an & the - English Grammar lesson Take the quiz - http://www.learnex.in/articles-a-an-the/ The 3 articles in English are a, an and the. The learner has to decide noun-by-noun which one of the articles to use. In fact, there are 4 choices to make, because sometimes no article is necessary. Native-speakers, of course, use the articles correctly without thinking. English learners, on the other hand, need to have some guidelines for making the right choice - particularly those learners whose own language does not have articles. The guidelines that follow in this lesson should help ESL students to a basic understanding of English article use. The words a, an and the are known as articles. • We use an before words that begin with vowels (a,e,i,o,u). E.g. I found an orange boat. However there are few exceptions like the words honest and hour. In the words honest and hour the alphabet h is silent and therefore the letter o becomes the first alphabet of the word and hence we use the article an. E.g. Mr. Smith is an honest man. I will be with you in an hour. We use a before words that begin with consonants (all the letters of the alphabet except the vowels). E.g. Bumble is a baby elephant. • We use the before words that we have already spoken about. E.g. I bought an apple. The apple is very sweet.
Language and culture: A Salish Indian perspective | Kyle Felsman | TEDxArlee
 
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Kyle describes the importance of language preservation and finding our similarities rather than focusing on our differences. Kyle Felsman was born in Missoula and grew up in Arlee. He graduated from Arlee High School in 2010, and recently graduated from the University of Montana in May of 2015 with a double major in Native American Studies and Political Science. Kyle was raised by his parents Trina and Troy Felsman, while growing up with his brothers Zach and T.J. Kyle is also a proud father to Emma Felsman and proud boyfriend to Makenzie Merwin. Kyle and Makenzie have been together for 5 years and are expecting another girl in July. Kyle currently works at the Nkwusm Salish Language Immersion School, learing the Salish language with the hopes of one day teaching it. Kyle is heavily involved in cultural activities and plans on continuting to learn more about his langauge and culture while building his family. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Просмотров: 2622 TEDx Talks
The K-5 COMPLETE LESSON PLANNER
 
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http://www.k12helper.com What is the Complete Lesson Planner? The COMPLETE LESSON PLANNER is a tried & tested digital lesson plan book. It includes professionally designed templates for all core K-5 subjects: Reading, Writing, Word Knowledge, Guided Reading, Math, Science, & Social Studies. Why is it such a great tool? The COMPLETE LESSON PLANNER chops literally hours off your weekly planning time by using a wide variety of drop-down lists for: • Learning Standards: Common Core (ELA/Math), Next Generation Science Standards, C3 Framework • Common Core-Aligned Skills & Strategies for Reading & Writing • Genres, Reading Levels (Lexile, A-Z, DRA) • Student lists for running records & guided reading groups With the COMPLETE LESSON PLANNER you can: • produce detailed, professional, and beautifully-formatted lesson plans every week • Store all your weekly plans digitally- so you can reuse/ tweak them week after week & year after year!
Просмотров: 1064 Mark Butler
Passive Voice - English Lesson
 
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In this English lesson, we will be looking at how to formulate and use the Passive Voice. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://www.anglo-link.com Passive Voice Exercises: http://youtu.be/ye3-vJkO0A8 Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Happy studies!
Просмотров: 2122062 Anglo-Link
Who Was Sacagawea?
 
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Lewis and Clark's journey to the American Northwest would have been possible without the help of Sacagawea, a Native American teenager with a new baby. This video will show students how Sacagawea led the Corps of Discovery through uncharted territory and helped begin America’s age of westward expansion! Check out all the educational videos from Flocabulary, often called the "Schoolhouse Rock" of the 21st Century, at http://flocabulary.com For lesson plans and activities that go along with this video, visit https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/sacagawea/ Connect With Us! Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/flocabulary Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/flocabulary Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/flocabulary Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/flocabulary Beat: TrackPros
Просмотров: 52552 Flocabulary
The Legacy of Nutritional Experiments in Residential Schools
 
02:02:56
Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and in partnership with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, with support from the UBC First Nations House of Learning, the UBC Department of History and Kloshe Tillicum (Network Environments for Aboriginal Health Research). Shortly after WWII, when knowledge about nutrition was still sparse, scientists in Canada took advantage of already malnourished aboriginal communities by using them as research subjects to investigate the effects of different diets and dietary supplements. Evidence of these government-run experiments was brought to the forefront by food historian and UBC History alumnus Ian Mosby, and the research has gained widespread recognition. Sometimes the experiments involved decreasing food intake or withholding supplements. Hundreds of indigenous people across Canada were included in the experiments, of which they had no knowledge, and many of them were children in the Indian Residential School system. The fallout from this unethical treatment is still having an effect today. Join us for a panel discussion about this distressing era in Canadian history and find out how UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems is working to address issues such as access to healthy, traditional food; food security for all; and land stewardship. Shortly after WWII, when knowledge about nutrition was still sparse, scientists in Canada took advantage of already malnourished aboriginal communities by using them as research subjects to investigate the effects of different diets and dietary supplements. Evidence of these government-run experiments was brought to the forefront by food historian and UBC History alumnus Ian Mosby, and the research has gained widespread recognition. Sometimes the experiments involved decreasing food intake or withholding supplements. Hundreds of indigenous people across Canada were included in the experiments, of which they had no knowledge, and many of them were children in the Indian Residential School system. The fallout from this unethical treatment is still having an effect today. Moderator Jo-Ann Archibald, BEd(Elem)’72 – Associate Dean for Indigenous Education, UBC’s Faculty of Education Presenter Ian Mosby, BA’03 – Postdoctoral Fellow, L.R. Wilson Institute for Canadian History, McMaster University Panelists Chief Robert Joseph, LLD’03 – Hereditary Chief, Gwawaenuk First Nation; Ambassador for Reconciliation Canada and the Indian Residential School Survivors Society Eduardo Jovel, MSc’96, PhD’02 – Director, Indigenous Research Partnerships; Associate Professor, Faculty of Land and Food Systems Jessie Newman – UBC Dietetics student Gerry Oleman – Member, St’at’imc Nation
Просмотров: 2839 The University of British Columbia
Engaging Youth With Indigenous Materials in Libraries and Classrooms
 
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"Assessing and incorporating teaching and learning resources by and about First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples is critical for librarians, educators and parents. Awareness of diverse epistemologies, notions of cultural authenticity and historical accuracy, and the influence of colonialism, are essential when considering books, films and interactive media for library and classroom collections. This panel will address challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous librarians, educators and parents when drawing upon materials representing Indigenous peoples and cultures. They will offer insights about such issues as cultural appropriation, stereotypes, addressing colonialism and what to do with dated resources. This session is ideal for teacher candidates, classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, youth librarians and parents. Convener: Jo-Anne Naslund, UBC Education Library Moderator: Lisa P. Nathan, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the First Nations Curriculum Concentration, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies Panelists: Debra Martel, Associate Director, First Nations House of Learning; Jan Hare, Associate Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education; Allison Taylor-McBryde, Adjunct Professor, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies."
Просмотров: 2348 The University of British Columbia
CURRICULUM HAUL | Colonial Times Books | HOMESCHOOL
 
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We are kicking off our American History units with the Colonial times. We did an introduction to American History with a small unit on Columbus, but this is our first official unit of a series of units that will span several months. Now that all our materials have arrived, I can work on separating them into smaller units. Once they are all sorted ( we got a lot of material!!), I can begin lesson planning. The first step in lesson planning for me is figuring out how long each book, project or kit is going to take to complete. I use full back sticky Post-Its to help me in this part of the process. I adhere a Post-It on the back of the book or kit and I write whatever information can help in the lesson planning process. For instance, I write long long the book will take to complete and how many chapters I have to read each day to complete the book. If we aren't going to read a book cover to cover, I write what pages or sections we'll cover. If my children are going to read the book, I mark who will read it and how long it will take to complete. If it's a project book, I mark the projects we plan to do with Post-It flags, as well as mark what supplies I'll need to find or buy for the projects. I keep all these materials, books, etc. in a bin. Right now they are stored in our school room's closet, but we are fast running our of space. I've used some additional storage right outside our school room, and again this year, some shuffle is needed so I can keep these new units accessible throughout the year. I especially like open bins for storing our unit studies. Once the general lesson planning is completed, I can more onto the detailed day to day lesson plans and figure out how long I want to spend on a unit. I usually make up our weekly lesson plans on Sunday. I sometimes plan a whole unit (6 weeks or so) at a time and that's very helpful, too. See the complete list of American History Haul videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlJU1f8WALE&list=PLJxUV0rOnlxxTWx_yJaOue7RH1gKhJP0A Get more information and the complete list of materials used for our American History units here: https://www.pepperandpine.com/?p=2926 Share pics of your projects with me! https://twitter.com/PepperandPine https://www.instagram.com/pepperandpine/ https://www.facebook.com/pepperandpine https://www.pepperandpine.com
Просмотров: 2126 Pepper and Pine