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Sentinel Node Biopsy: Breast Cancer Lymph Node Surgery
 
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We teach you why lymph nodes are important in breast cancer treatment. A sentinel node biopsy is the most common surgery performed to assess if cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _____________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon: 1. Am I a candidate for a “sentinel lymph node biopsy?” 2. If I have a “positive node” how will that change my treatment plan? 3. Under what situations might I need an “axillary dissection?” 4. What will you do if you find one or two nodes with cancer? 5. What are the side effects of the biopsy? 6. Can I avoid lymph node surgery altogether? Knowing your “lymph node status” helps determine which combination of therapies are best for treating your unique cancer. Only about 30% of all patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer are found to have cancer in their lymph nodes. If cancer travels to the lymph nodes, these cells typically go to the axillary lymph nodes under the arm on the same side of the newly diagnosed breast cancer. These cells usually lodge in the first 1, 2, or 3 lymph nodes (known as “sentinel nodes”) and grow there. Research suggests that cancer typically spreads to the sentinel nodes before the other 10 to 20 axillary nodes everyone has under the arm. If you are found to have cancer in your lymph nodes, you will likely be offered chemotherapy if you can tolerate it. It is less likely you will need chemotherapy if your lymph nodes are “negative.” Your lymph node status is one of many factors in deciding your treatment options. “Sentinel Node Biopsy” vs. “Axillary Dissection” A sentinel lymph node biopsy has replaced the more extensive “axillary dissection” for most early stage breast cancer surgeries. A sentinel node biopsy is easier to perform, is just as accurate, and causes fewer side effects than an axillary dissection. An axillary dissection is a more extensive surgery that removes all of the axillary lymph nodes and results in more armpit sensation loss and an increased risk of lymphedema than the less invasive sentinel node biopsy. There are some situations where an axillary dissection is still clearly needed. Having detected cancer in the lymph nodes before surgery is usually an indication for an axillary dissection. In some instances, if you are found to have cancer present in the sentinel nodes, you might need an axillary dissection. Our goal with this course is to give you an outline on axillary surgery so you can better make these decisions with your breast surgeon. How is a sentinel lymph node biopsy performed? Hours before your breast surgery, you will likely undergo a small injection into the skin of your breast of a mildly radioactive “tracer.” This tracer slowly filters through the lymphatic system of the breast to the first one or two axillary lymph nodes (sentinel nodes) under your arm. These are the same lymph nodes that breast cancer cells would first travel to from the breast. A blue dye injection is also commonly used in addition to the radioactive tracer. Your surgeon will use a small probe (similar to a Geiger counter) during surgery to find your sentinel nodes. The dye can also turn the same sentinel nodes blue in color, assisting your surgeon in finding them. The term “biopsy” implies taking just a piece of these nodes. In fact, these “sentinel nodes” are removed intact. The average number of sentinel nodes removed is only about three of the 10 – 20 lymph nodes normally present under the arm. Are there side effects of a sentinel node biopsy? Sentinel node surgery is a much less invasive procedure than an axillary dissection. The risks do include pain and discomfort in the armpit that does improve over time. You may have some permanent, partial sensation loss in the armpit and upper, inner arm. There is a slight risk of mild lymphedema. If your surgeon uses “blue dye” during the surgery to help find the sentinel nodes, there is a 1 to 2 % chance of having an allergic reaction to the dye. Does a “positive” sentinel node mean an axillary dissection? Until recently, surgeons would remove the sentinel lymph nodes and immediately have a pathologist evaluate the nodes under the microscope to see if cancer was present. For years, if any cancer was found in a sentinel node, surgeons would go ahead and remove all the nodes during the same surgery. This “axillary dissection” results in more long-term side effects than a sentinel node biopsy surgery. In 2011, the ACOSOG Z00011 clinical trial showed that carefully selected women with early stage cancer undergoing a lumpectomy can now avoid an axillary dissection if only one or two sentinel nodes are found to be involved with a small amount of cancer.
Просмотров: 411 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Sentinel Lymph Node & Axillary Lymph Node Procedures for Breast Cancer
 
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Tina J. Hieken, M.D., breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, talks about sentinel lymph node biopsy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. She explains the procedures and discusses recent advances that permit a patient-specific tailored approach to the management of breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes. To learn more, visit http://mayocl.in/2zTaR54.
Просмотров: 12133 Mayo Clinic
"Axillary Dissection for Breast Cancer" by Prof. Chintamani
 
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Prof. Chintamani MS, FRCS(Ed.), FRCS(Glas.),FRCS (Irel.), FACS, FICS(Surg Oncol), FIMSA President Association Of Breast Surgeons Of India Hon. Secretary, Association Of Surgeons Of India-2012 Governing Council Member- Association Of Surgeons Of India Fellow The Royal Society Of Medicine UK Editor in Chief- Surgical Clinics of India Editor in Chief- New Indian Journal of Surgery Joint Editor- Indian Journal of Surgical Oncology Associate Editor: Indian Journal of Surgery Vardhman Mahavir Medical College Safdarjang Hospital New Delhi
Просмотров: 46770 ProfChintamani
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy In Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Charles E. Cox, of the Breast Health Program at the University of South Florida demonstrates a sentinel lymph node biopsy.
Просмотров: 50725 USFBreastHealth
Axilary Lymph Node Biopsy and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy For Breast Cancer - Lazoi.com
 
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An axillary lymph node Biopsy is surgical procedure to remove lymph nodes from the armpit (underarm). The lymph nodes in the armpit are called axillary lymph nodes (underarm lumps). An axillary lymph node Biopsy is also called axillary dissection, axillary node dissection or axillary lymphadenectomy. Breast Sentinel Biopsy involves removing the first lymph node (or nodes) in the armpit to which cancer cells are likely to spread from the breast. It’s essential that sentinel node biopsy is done by a surgeon who is trained and experienced in this method. Sentinel node biopsy is usually done during breast surgery (Surgery to remove breast cancer). Sometimes it may be performed as a separate procedure. The length of time it takes to do sentinel node biopsy varies for individual women. A lymph node biopsy removes lymph node tissue to be looked at under a microscope for signs of infection or a disease, such as cancer. Other tests may also be used to check the lymph tissue sample, including a culture, genetic tests, or tests to study the body's immune system. Lymph nodes are part of the immune system. They are found in the neck, behind the ears, in the armpits glands, and in the chest, belly, and groin. To remove these lumps, lump node biopsy surgery is used. Lumpectomy or lumpectomy surgery for breast cancer is surgery to remove cancer or other abnormal tissue from your breast. Lumpectomy is also called breast conserving surgery or wide local excision because unlike a mastectomy, only a portion of the breast is removed. Doctors may also refer to Breast cancer lumpectomy as an excisional biopsy. Symptoms of breast lump • you discover a new lump • an area of your breast is noticeably different than the rest • a lump does not go away after menstruation • a lump changes or grows larger • your breast is bruised for no apparent reason • the skin of your breast is red or begins to pucker like an orange peel • you have an inverted nipple (if it was not always inverted) • you notice bloody discharge from the nipple Treatment of breast lump If the lump is found to be breast cancer, treatment can include: • lumpectomy, or removing the lump • mastectomy, which refers to removing your breast tissue • chemotherapy, which uses drugs to fight or destroy the cancer • radiation treatment for breast cancer, a treatment that uses radioactive rays or materials to fight the cancer Breast lump removal is surgery to remove a lump that present breast cancer. Tissue around the lump is also removed. This surgery is called a lumpectomy. When a noncancerous tumor such as a fibroadenoma of the breast is removed, it is often called an excisional breast biopsy, instead of a lumpectomy. There are two types of breast cancer surgery: Breast conserving surgery (also called a lumpectomy (used for breast cancer treatment), quadrantectomy, partial mastectomy, or segmental mastectomy) – in which only the part of the breast containing the cancer is removed. How lymph node biopsy surgery performed The sentinel node is then checked for the presence of cancer cells by a pathologist. If cancer is found, the surgeon may remove additional lymph nodes, either during the same biopsy procedure or during a follow-up surgical procedure. SLNBs may be done on an outpatient basis or may require a short stay in the hospital.
Просмотров: 7241 Lazoi TheLife
Changes To Expect After Lymph Nodes Are Removed From Armpits
 
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In this video, Dr. Jay K Harness explains the changes that one might encounter after lymph nodes are removed from armpits. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/#

 Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask.

 This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 44064 Breast Cancer Answers®
Lymphatic drainage of the breast and spread of breast carcinoma
 
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Errata: 02:01 Axillary artery, not vein I talk and draw like I usually do. Not sped up due to lack of time for editing. Hope it helps!
Просмотров: 56687 Medicowesome
Exercises After Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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Learn about the exercises you should do after breast cancer surgery from Cancer Research UK.  This video shows you how to do shoulder shrugs and shoulder circles during the first week after surgery and goes on to show you arm exercises for the second week and beyond. These exercises help you regain normal movement so you can maintain your usual routine, have radiotherapy and prevent problems in the future. Find more information on the Cancer Research UK website: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/breast-cancer/treatment/surgery/after-surgery
Просмотров: 56925 Cancer Research UK
MRM    Modified Radical Mastectomy and Level I , II, III ALND for Carcinoma Breast  Part 01
 
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Prof. Dr Somashekhar SP M.S., Mch (Oncosurgery), FRCS (Edinburgh) Chariman, Oncology Manipal Health Enterprize, HOD, Department of Surgical Oncology and Robotics Adjunct Professor of Surgical Oncology (KMC) Consultant Surgical Oncologist & Robotic Surgeon Manipal Comprehensive Cancer Centre Manipal Hospital #98, HAL Airport Road Bangalore 560017
Просмотров: 123998 Dr. Somashekhar S P
Breast Cancer. Mastectomy and lymphadenectomy.
 
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Просмотров: 15130 José García
Positive Lymph Nodes During Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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Dr. Harness discusses what it means for a woman with breast cancer to be lymph node positive, and the treatment that follows that diagnosis. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 33275 Breast Cancer Answers®
Sentinel Lymph node biopsy in breast cancer by Dual technique
 
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A technique of Sentinel lymph node biopsy by using Tc99m and methylene blue.
Просмотров: 277 Nikhil Gulavani
Axillary Lymph Node Dissection: Explained By Dr. Harness
 
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Dr. Harness defined axillary lymph node dissection and explains when it is necessary for breast cancer patients. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers suggest questions and topics and get answers from breast cancer experts. Suggest a topic now at http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 5603 Breast Cancer Answers®
Breast sentinel node biopsy • Oncolex
 
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More info: http://bit.ly/Oncolex-Sentinel-node-biopsy Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/oncolex
Просмотров: 10922 Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
 
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For more information, visit CancerQuest at http://www.cancerquest.org/sentinel-lymph-node-biopsy. A video-animation presentation about sentinel lymph node biopsies for breast cancer diagnosis. 3D graphics are used to explain the process. Topics include the lymphatic system and the methods used. This video is part of the breast cancer education series produced by CancerQuest at Emory University. For further information, visit http://www.cancerquest.org
Просмотров: 136536 CancerQuest
Breast Cancer Lymph Node Clearance Chemo port Post-op
 
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This is day after my Lymph Node Removal and Chemo Port insertion. Thanks for watching and please dont forget to subscribe! Best of luck to you all!
Просмотров: 1041 ilovepeta2
Modified Radical Mastectomy..!! Breast Cancer Removal Surgery..!! MRM Surgery..!!
 
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Radical mastectomy is a surgical procedure involving the removal of breast, underlying chest muscle (including pectoralis major and pectoralis minor), and lymph nodes of the axilla as a treatment for breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women today, and is primarily treated by surgery, particularly during the early twentieth century when the mastectomy was developed with success.[1] However, with the advancement of technology and surgical skills, the extent of mastectomies has been reduced. Less invasive mastectomies are employed today in comparison to those in the past. Nowadays, a combination of radiotherapy and breast conserving mastectomy are employed to optimize treatment. Modified Radical Mastectomy:: When treating breast cancer, a doctor’s goal is to remove all of the cancer -- or as much of it as possible. Surgery is one of the mainstays of treatment, and a procedure called modified radical mastectomy (MRM) is now a standard surgical treatment for early-stage breast cancers. It’s especially helpful for treating early-stage breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes. Studies show MRM is as effective as a traditional radical mastectomy, but takes much less of a toll on a woman’s appearance. Because of the success with MRMs, traditional radical mastectomies are rarely done today. What Is Modified Radical Mastectomy? MRM doesn’t remove chest muscles like a traditional radical mastectomy does. During the procedure, the surgeon removes the breast, including the skin, breast tissue, areola, and nipple, and most of the lymph nodes under the arm. The lining over the large muscle in the chest is also removed, but the muscle itself is left in place. Following a traditional radical mastectomy, women often have a hollow in the chest. Because the chest muscle is kept in place with an MRM, this doesn’t happen. While you are under general anesthesia, the surgeon will make a single incision across one side of the chest. The skin is pulled back, and the doctor will remove the entire breast tissue, along with the lining over the pectoralis major. Usually, he’ll remove some of the lymph nodes under your arm as well. The goal of the surgery is to remove the cancer but preserve as much of the skin and tissue as possible so that you can have breast reconstruction, if you chose. Although research has found MRM to be generally safe and effective, like all surgical procedures it can have risks. They include: Bleeding Infection Swelling of the arm Pockets of fluid forming underneath the incision (called seromas) Risks from general anesthesia Some people have numbness in the upper arm after surgery. It’s caused by damage to small nerves in the area where the lymph nodes are taken out. There is a good chance that you’ll regain most of the feeling in your arm over time. Lymph nodes that are removed will be sent to a lab to see whether the cancer has spread to them.
Просмотров: 2350 SDM
Why Do They Remove Lymph Nodes With Breast Cancer?
 
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Cancer in the lymph nodes is associated with an increased a mastectomy or lumpectomy operation will most often include either sentinel node biopsy axillary dissection. Lymph node removal & lymphedema national breast cancer lymph for invasive surgery to remove nodes research uk. Sentinel node biopsy and axillary. Pain after 16 oct 2017 when someone is diagnosed with breast cancer, knowing if cancer has spread to their axillary lymph nodes can determine the type of treatment they also, nodes, a doctor will usually recommend removing during surgery remove 9 feb 2011 an article in wednesday's times describes how routine procedure for early surgical removal cancerous from armpit been found unnecessary many patients. Both procedures involve a separate incision for lumpectomy patients. Axillary lymph node removal may benefit patients cancer. A european study in 1981 evaluated 716 women with breast cancer and found no difference survival when extra lymph nodes 2 feb 2015 now, many patients receive chemotherapy before surgery. Googleusercontent search. If the fna or core biopsy shows cancer has spread to lymph nodes you'll usually be recommended have all most of your removed at same time as breast surgery. Breastcancer breastcancer treatment surgery lymph_node_removal "imx0m" url? Q webcache. Living how is breast cancer related to the axillary lymph nodes? . Examining your lymph nodes helps doctors figure out the extent of cancer involvement. Removing lymph nodes may raise risk of long term pain. Lymph node removal in early stage breast cancer national think twice before considering lymph. Following surgery, the pathologist will test lymph nodes to determine whether cancer has spread past breast if there are cells in nodes, a surgeon removes most or all of under arm. Breast cancer and lymph nodes q. Lymph node surgery for breast cancer american society. Will i need surgery on my armpit? Surgical removal of underarm lymph nodes in breast cancer treatments to the care. During breast surgery, some axillary nodes may be removed to see if they contain cancer cells. Knowing whether or not the cancer has women with some forms of very early breast cancer, such as ductal lobular carcinoma in situ, do need lymph node testing. If cancer has spread to these lymph nodes, patients are advised undergo additional treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, help treat their disease node removal. If an ultrasound does not detect signs of cancer in your armpit, the lymph nodes will be checked more detail during surgery to make sure they're clear. There are two alternative techniques 4 jan 2017 surgical removal of underarm (axillary) lymph nodes is often part the initial treatment for patients with operable breast cancer. The finding turns 100 years of standard medical practice on its head. Lymph node removal & lymphedema national breast cancer lymph for invasive. Giuliano said he now feels comfortable telling patients that, in the long term, they would suffer more
Просмотров: 10 E Market
Lymph nodes dissection biopsy | Breast cancer treatment
 
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Watch this video to know about lymph nodes dissection and biopsy in breast cancer. Find incidence of cancer by studying cancer and palliative nursing. Know more and signup for the course : https://goo.gl/TVi4nL
Просмотров: 70 Medvarsity Online Limited
Breast Cancer Lumpectomy and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy, Darrin Hansen MD, Salt Lake City Utah
 
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A narrated breast lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy procedure for breast cancer performed by Darrin Hansen, MD.
Просмотров: 477697 Darrin Hansen
Mastectomy (modified radical mastectomy)
 
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Educational step-by-step video on the surgical procedure for a modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. This video is provided by MovieSurg. More educational surgical videos can be found at www.moviesurg.com
Просмотров: 72125 MovieSurg
Surgeons in Training Axillary Node Clearance
 
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Просмотров: 2640 lê phúc anh
Removing lymph nodes from breast cancer patients?
 
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The Journal of the American Medical Association has published a study suggesting that previous standard lymph node removal practices in women with certain types of breast cancer may not always be the advisable course to take. Tina Finlayson, MD, a surgical oncologist at the University of Colorado Hospital and a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, offers her view.
Просмотров: 281 University of Colorado Denver
Why Do They Remove Lymph Nodes With Breast Cancer?
 
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Breast cancer, lymph node biopsy, and dissection webmd. Googleusercontent search. Both procedures involve a separate incision for lumpectomy patients. Duke breast cancer surgeons in durham, the most common place for to spread is lymph nodes center will remove so that pathologist can examine there are a number of different types surgery used treat. Lymph node removal & lymphedema national breast cancer lymph for invasive. During most breast cancer surgeries, the lymph nodes under arm are advised to have additional removed in a full axillary node dissection 4 oct 2013 researchers from university of texas southwestern medical center say that may do more harm than 9 feb 2011 an article wednesday's times describes how routine procedure for treatment early surgical removal sometimes spreads underarm area. A physical exam, but this does not take the place of a pathologist's exam lymph nodes removed during biopsy. Surgery in breast cancer treatment, lumpectomy by moose and doc. If you have invasive breast cancer, your surgeon will probably remove some of the lymph nodes under arm during lumpectomy or mastectomy. Will probably remove one or some of your lymph nodes to determine if they also contain having removed can increase risk developing a even the biopsy does not show cancer, clip helps communicate with this avoid someone biopsying same area all over again because did know. Or most of your lymph nodes removed at the same time as breast surgery 2 surgeon may need to remove additional axillary surgical removal tumor or positive is still 8 feb 2011 node not needed for cancer patients. Lymph node negative means the axillary lymph nodes do not contain cancer. Breastcancer breastcancer treatment surgery lymph_node_removal url? Q webcache. Lymph node removal can be done in different ways, depending on whether any they may do this during the same operation as your breast surgery or a second surgeon makes small cut armpit to remove lymph nodes 12 dec 2016 trap cancer cells that were traveling away from original mastectomy is surgical of entire fact sheet describes sentinel biopsy procedure and details removing additional nearby look for not first inside chest (under breastbone) before 6 mar occurs with many cancers cancer, nodes, way reducing metastasis, sometimes spread under arm. 14 feb 2017 lymph node removal. But it can take a while to recover, and have complications like lymph node removal surgery may be performed determine if your breast cancer has spread beyond. Is lymph node removal with cancer surgery really necessary? . Treatments surgery to the lymph nodes breast cancer care. Lymph node removal & lymphedema national breast cancer lymph for invasive surgery american society. Sentinel lymph node biopsy for early stage breast cancer sentinel national institute. Lymph node removal for breast cancer duke health. Breast cancer and lymph nodes q. Surgery to remove some or all of the lymph nodes under your arm is called axillary node dissection a mastect
Просмотров: 53 Duck the Question
Axillary Node Dissection with FOCUS®
 
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Watch this auxiliary node dissection with FOCUS® Shears performed by Dr. Wallace. Learn more about HARMONIC FOCUS Shears: http://www.ethicon.com/healthcare-professionals/products/advanced-energy/harmonic/harmonic-focus-plus?f=yt#!videos Schedule a demo for HARMONIC FOCUS Shears: https://www.ethicon.com/healthcare-professionals/schedule-demo?f=yt Connect with us! - Follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ethicon - Follow us on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/company/ethicon
Просмотров: 10910 Ethicon
Do not dissect axillary lymph nodes
 
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Do not dissect Axillary Lymph nodes A young woman returns from mammography with a miniscule tumor which drags her into the grinding mill of modern medicine. From now and onward she will be exposed to worthless treatments causing unnecessary suffering and pain. In other presentations I describe the futility of its treatments: 1. Breast irradiation is dangerous and should be avoided. 2. Irradiation of the left breast damages the heart and should be avoided. 3. Aromatase inhibitors cause a grave estrogen deficiency disease and should be avoided. Yet the most mutilating treatment is axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), which causes painful lymph edema in the dissected arm: [Presentation: Do not let them touch your lymph nodes]. This ordeal results from the false interpretation of breast cancer by medicine. Medicine regards axillary nodes as an isolated and independent phenomenon which should be controlled. There is a localized tumor and a locoregional axillary involvement . Two independent phenomena . While in reality both belong to a multidimensional process. According to the Halsted hypothesis, tumor starts as a local event in a breast. It proceeds to the regional lymph nodes and later on into the vascular system. This false hypothesis is gradually crumbling down. In order to stop tumor progression Halsted performed a mutilating radical mastectomy which fortunately became obsolete. Yet Halsted's dark shadow still looms over medicine. Accordingly the localized tumor first spreads to regional axillary nodes and then enters the vascular system. Which results in the mutilating ALND treatment. Studies which medicine likes to ignore indicate that breast cancer is an evolving field involving both breasts Both breasts consist of one system, Following virus infection, the entire field progresses as a whole . Its progression velocity is controlled by the organism. Axillary lymph nodes evolve at the same rate as the breast cancer field. Their treatment affects the entire field. Axillary lymph node dissection ought to be avoided.
Просмотров: 5162 Gershom Zajicek M.D,
What is LYMPHADENECTOMY? What does LYMPHADENECTOMY mean? LYMPHADENECTOMY meaning
 
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What is LYMPHADENECTOMY? What does LYMPHADENECTOMY mean? LYMPHADENECTOMY meaning - LYMPHADENECTOMY definition - LYMPHADENECTOMY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection is the surgical removal of one or more groups of lymph nodes. It is almost always performed as part of the surgical management of cancer. In a regional lymph node dissection, some of the lymph nodes in the tumor area are removed; in a radical lymph node dissection, most or all of the lymph nodes in the tumor area are removed. It is usually done because many types of cancer have a marked tendency to produce lymph node metastasis early in their natural history. This is particularly true of melanoma, head and neck cancer, differentiated thyroid cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Famed British surgeon Berkeley Moynihan once remarked that "the surgery of cancer is not the surgery of organs; it is the surgery of the lymphatic system". The better-known examples of lymphadenectomy are axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer; radical neck dissection for head and neck cancer and thyroid cancer; D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer; and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. For clinical stages 1 and 2 breast cancer, axillary lymph node dissection should only be performed after first attempting sentinel node biopsy. Sentinel node biopsy can establish cancer staging of the axilla if there are positive lymph nodes present. It also is less risky than performing lymphadenectomy, having fewer side effects and a much lower chance of causing lymphedema. If cancer is not present in sentinel lymph nodes then the axillary lymph node dissection should not be performed. If one or two sentinel nodes have cancer which is not extensive, then no axillary dissection should be performed but the person with cancer should have breast-conserving surgery and chemotherapy appropriate for their stage of cancer. More recently, the concept of sentinel lymph node mapping has been popularized by Donald Morton and others. Cancer with various primary sites (breast, melanoma, colorectal, etc.) often metastasize early to the first drainage lymphatic basin. This process is predictable anatomically according to the primary site in the organ and the lymphatic channels. The first nodes (sentinel nodes) can be identified by particulate markers such as lymphazurin, methylene blue, India ink and radio-labelled colloid protein particles injected near the tumor site. The draining sentinel node can then be found by the surgeon and excised for verification by the pathologist if tumor cells are present, and often these tumor cells are few and only easily recognized by careful examination or by using techniques such as special stains, i.e. immunohistochemical. When the sentinel node is free of tumor cells, this is highly predictive of freedom from metastasis in the entire lymphatic basin, thus allowing a full node dissection to be avoided. The practice of sentinel lymph node mapping has changed the surgical approach in many cancer systems, sparing a formal lymph node dissection for patients with sentinel lymph node negative for tumor and directing a full node dissection for patients with sentinel lymph node positive for tumor metastases. For example in stage 2 breast carcinoma, using the sentinel lymph node technique, 65% of patients could be spared from a formal node dissection. Lymphedema may result from lymphadenectomy. Extensive resection of lymphatic tissue can lead to the formation of a lymphocele.
Просмотров: 157 The Audiopedia
Difference Between Sentinel Biopsy and Axillary Dissection Following Neoadjuvant Therapy
 
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In this video, Dr. Harness explains the differences between two procedures that doctors use to follow up neadjuvant therapy. Specifically, he discusses sentinel lymph node biopsy and axillary lymph node dissection. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 17148 Breast Cancer Answers®
Axillary Lymph Node Biopsy
 
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Axillary lymph node enlargement can present as underarm lumps. Common causes for axillary lymph node enlargement in India can be: - Tuberculosis - Breast Cancer But majority of the times these lymph nodes are reactive in nature (no specific cause) and they settle down with a course of antibiotics In case you feel lumps in the underarm area, contact your breast surgeon.
Просмотров: 11854 Rohan Khandelwal
Breast cancer staging with applied anatomy of breast and axillary lymph nodes
 
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In this video, CancerBro explains breast cancer staging with applied anatomy of breast and axillart lymph nodes. Video Transcript: CancerBro, how is the staging of breast cancer done? The staging of breast cancer is called TNM staging. We will discuss this in detail. It is called as T1 when the tumor size is less than or equal to 2 cm. T2 when the tumor is 2 cm to 5 cm. And T3 when the tumor is more than 5 cm. To understand T4 disease, first we have to know the structures. Deep to the breast there is pectoralls fascia and pectoralls major muscle. And here lies the pectoralis minor muscle. Other structures in the chest wall include ribs and intercostal muscles. If we look from the front of the chest, this is the pectoralis major muscle. And this is the serratus anterior muscle. T4a disease is when the tumor inflirates the chest wall, not including only pectoralis muscle adhesion or invasion. And here, the tumor infiltrates into the serratus anterior muscle. T4b disease is involvement of skin by the tumor. It can present as skin ulceration or as satellite tumor nodules. Or as edema of skin looking like an orange peel known as peau de orange. All the skin changes should occupy less than one-third of the surface area of breast to be called as T4b. Infiltration of tumor into both, chest wall and skin, i.e., T4a and T4b both, is called T4c. And when the breast cancer progresses very rapidly to cause diffuse erythema and edema of skin breast, involving more than one-third of the skin, then it is called as inflammatory breast cancer. Now, we move on to the N-staging. To understand the N staging, first you have to know the local structures in that area. In this figure, you can see the humerus, clavicle and sternum bone. This is the pectoralls minor muscle. These nodular structures in the anterior axillary fold, are called as anterior group of lymph nodes. And along the head of the humerus are lateral group of lymp nodes. All these three groups, lateral to pectoralis minor muscle, are level 1 lymph nodes. These present behind the pectoralls minor muscle are central, or level 2 lymph nodes. And these present medial to pectoralls minor muscle, are apical or level 3 lymph nodes. And these, along the sternum are called as internal mammary lymph nodes. For clinical N-staging, we have to palpate level 1 and 2 lymph nodes in axilla. If they are not palpable, it is NO. If palpable, and freely mobile, it is N1. If level 1 or level 2 lymph nodes are palpable, but they are fixed or matted, it is called as N2a. If only internal mammary lymph nodes are seen in CT scan without any level 1 or level 2 nodes, the it is called as N2b. If infraclavicular lymph nodes are involved, it is called as N3a. If internal mammary ans axillary lymph nodes both are involved that is N2a and N2b, then it is N3b. Involvement of supraclavicular lymph nodes are called as N3c. Now, let's move ahead. Next comes the M-staging, if the disease has spread to the distance organ it is called as M1 otherwise it is MO. This figure shows spread to both lungs in the form or multiple metastatic nodules. And here, metastasis to the pleura has resulted in fluid collection, called as pleural effusion. This figure shows spread to the liver in form or multiple nodular deposits. And here, the cancer is spread to the adrenal gland. Similarly, the spread may occur to brain, bones or other part of the body. Subscribe to our YouTube channel and join the Mrs. Brooks journey to know all about breast cancer. CancerBro will walk you through risk factors, stagings, and respective treatments of breast cancer. CancerBro is also active on social media channels. Follow him to get rich and authoritative content related to cancer awareness, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, etc. Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/officialcancerbro Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/official_cancerbro Twitter - https://twitter.com/cancer_bro/ Website - http://www.cancerbro.com/
Просмотров: 193 CancerBro
The Rope: Axillary web syndrome as a result of lymph node removal.
 
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Serious scar tissue side effect from lymph node removal from mastectomy for breast cancer, called axillary web syndrome or chording. I call it the rope in my arm.
Просмотров: 2713 Janet St. James
What is a Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy?
 
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With so many breast cancer terms, men and women are often overwhelmed, especially when there's a term like sentinel lymph node biopsy. Although the term may sound quiet confusing and intimidating, this technique can help clarify the stage of your cancer. Medical Director Dr. Jay Harness explains, “A sentinel lymph node biopsy is a selective biopsy of one up to may be four lymph nodes in the armpit area.” This procedure can be used to see if a known cancer has spread from the original cancer site. There are couple of different ways of doing the sentinel lymph node technique. Find out from Dr. Jay Harness what a sentinel lymph node biopsy is and the different ways of performing this technique. SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/user/drjayharness VISIT BREASTCANCERANSWERS.com FOR THE LATEST IN BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/news SUBMIT A QUESTION http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ DOWNLOAD DR. HARNESS' 15 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+: http://bit.ly/16nhEnr Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerAnswers Twitter: https://twitter.com/BreastCancerDr
Просмотров: 4267 Breast Cancer Answers®
Possible Complications Following Lymph Node Surgery
 
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Dr. Jay K. Harness discusses the various complications that may arise following a lymph node test or removal, including burning sensations, numbness, and nerve entrapment. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 24606 Breast Cancer Answers®
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
 
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Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Breast Cancer
Просмотров: 48980 George Filippakis
Breast conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer
 
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Breast conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer. come from:http://www.surgbbs.com/
Просмотров: 2043 Operation john
Which Breast Cancer Patients Need Lymph Nodes Removed? Mayo Clinic-Led Research Narrows It Down
 
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Which breast cancer patients need to have underarm lymph nodes removed? Mayo Clinic-led research is narrowing it down. A new study finds that only some women with lymph node-positive breast cancer need all of their underarm nodes taken out: Ultrasound is a reliable way to judge before breast cancer surgery whether chemotherapy wiped out cancer in the underarm lymph nodes, the study found. Mayo Clinic breast surgeon Judy Boughey, M.D., explains the findings’ benefits for patients. For more information, see the post on the Mayo Clinic News Network.
Просмотров: 1092 Mayo Clinic
Lymph Node Removal During Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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The removal of the lymph nodes, as Dr. Harness explains in this video, is part of the local control of the cancer. Because cancer can spread to the lymph nodes, they play an important role in treating breast cancer and are used to determine staging as well as treatment. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 13271 Breast Cancer Answers®
Breast Cancer Axillary Ultrasound: Find involved nodes
 
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We teach you how a simple ultrasound of your axillary lymph nodes can tell you more about your breast cancer and expand your treatment options. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __ Questions for your Breast Surgeon: 1. Will you ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes today? 2. If not, will you order an axillary ultrasound by a radiologist? 3. Would my treatment change if we found cancer in my axillary nodes? 4. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo? 5. Why is Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 6. Why ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes before surgery? At diagnosis, one third of patients already have cancer in the lymph nodes under their arm (axilla). When the “Axillary Lymph Nodes” are involved with breast cancer your cancer is more threatening one. This information can dramatically change your treatment options. Studies have shown that “positive” axillary lymph nodes are commonly missed by your breast surgeon’s physical examination. A 5-minute ultrasound of your axilla can more accurately find cancer in these nodes. A pre-operative axillary ultrasound is a “cutting edge” advance in breast cancer care. Make sure to ask your breast surgeon about an axillary ultrasound when they are examining you. Many large cancer centers routinely utilize pre-operative axillary ultrasounds. How can this change my treatment plan? If an obviously abnormal node is found before surgery, then you have a more serious cancer. If appropriate, an ultrasound guided needle biopsy can be performed to confirm the node is involved with cancer. If you have cancer in your nodes, you will likely require chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) or after surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). Regardless of the findings of an axillary ultrasound, a surgical evaluation of your axillary lymph nodes will be needed when you undergo a definitive breast cancer surgery. The surgical procedures used today for lymph nodes are a “sentinel node biopsy” or an “axillary dissection.” What are the benefits of knowing you have involved nodes? Knowing you have “node positive” breast cancer before surgery can empower your breast cancer team to search for more sophisticated treatment options. A simple axillary ultrasound for early stage breast cancer identifies more “node positive” patients. If you are found early in your journey to have node positive breast cancer, more  pre-operative treatment options may be considered. We list some of the treatment benefits below. Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Lymph node “positive” breast cancer requires a more sophisticated treatment approach. An axillary ultrasound can help determine if you would benefit from a “multidisciplinary team” approach early on in your care, before surgery. Ask your breast specialists to present your unique cancer situation to their team so you will benefit from new ideas and cutting-edge treatment advances. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy When you know you have involved lymph nodes at diagnosis, you likely will be offered chemotherapy at some point in your treatment. There can be distinct advantages to having chemotherapy before surgery, rather than afterwards. This is known as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This complex decision is worth discussing with your breast surgeon. Breast surgeons choose the initial direction of your entire breast cancer treatment plan. An axillary ultrasound can better identify if you are a candidate for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Take our lesson on “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy” to learn more about the potential benefits of this treatment approach.
Просмотров: 275 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Lymph Node Irradiation in Breast Cancer Confirmed Useful
 
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A vast 15-year European study has confirmed that lymph node irradiation serves a useful purpose in women with breast cancer affecting the axillary lymph nodes (under the armpit) or where the tumor is located on the medial side (near the lymph nodes of the sternum).
Просмотров: 54 Institut Curie
Breast Cancer Discoveries Day 29: Lymphodema
 
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http://www.breastcancerdiscovery.com When we think of breast cancer, we generally think of a simple growth in the breast that would need to be checked and if necessary, get surgically removed. But not all breast cancer cases are the same. In day 29, learn from Dr. Susan Boolbol about Lymphodema, a type of breast cancer that handled a bit differently than most breast cancer cases. Video Transcript: "One of the potential complications of removing lymph nodes underneath the arm is something called lymphodema which is really a swelling of the arm. The reality is this is a lifelong potential complication that women have after removal of the lymph nodes underneath the arm. One of the issues is that we really don't know why some women get Lymphema and others do not. We know that one of the risks is removing the lymph nodes in what's called an axillary lymph node dissection. In the mid-90s a technique by the name of a sentinel lymph node biopsy really became accepted in the world of breast cancer. What this is is that it removes a few lymph nodes underneath the arm as opposed to removing all of the lymph nodes. Basically the sentinel lymph nodes are the first draining lymph nodes underneath the arm. By removing just a few lymph nodes, we greatly decrease the risk of a woman developing lymphodema. There are other techniques that are actually undergoing research right now to see if we can reduce this risk even further."
Просмотров: 378 DispellingTheMyths
Less is More For Lymph Node Removal
 
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It frequently fell into the category of unintended consequences. In an effort to aggressively combat breast cancer, women were losing lymph nodes. That often resulted in a loss of quality of life. Surgeons are now rethinking the practice. "I think we're getting more and more away from lymph nodes, which really creates a lot of side effects, a lot of complications with lymphedema," says Dr. Rie Aihara, surgical oncologist on Lee Memorial Health System's medical staff. It was not uncommon for women to find themselves battling lymphedema, a life-long swelling that occurs when fewer lymph nodes are available to distribute lymphatic fluid. Many also required post-op therapies to alleviate severe pain and reduced range of motion. "There's a lot of scaring involved and limited range of motion in usually the shoulder and sometimes the neck and thoracic region. A lot of times they cannot reach into cabinets or do their hair. Sometimes they actually need someone to help them with showering," says Pat Curr, Lee Memorial Health System physical therapist. Comprehensive studies were done to find out if lymph node removal was necessary to treat invasive breast cancer. The conclusion was 'no' years ago surgeons removed 20 to 30 lymph nodes from armpit, now it's believed that less is more. "If there were cancer cells regardless of how big the deposits were, we used to remove all the lymph nodes. But with this new data- a group of women who had these lymph nodes that were positive who went on to axillary node dissection vs. those that didn't and the conclusion was there really were no difference. It just added risk," says Dr. Aihara. It's a conservative approach to breast cancer, that's leaving women cancer-free and clear of a major complication. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org
Просмотров: 6814 Lee Health
How to Prepare for Breast Surgery: Lumpectomy and Lymph Node Surgery
 
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How to Prepare for Breast Surgery: Lumpectomy and Lymph Node Surgery Section one explains what you should and should not do before your surgery. Section two tells you what to expect during and after your surgery. The information within this video is not intended to replace any advice provided to you by your health care team. For your safety, we ask that you do not act on the information within these videos without first discussing your treatment or healthy living plan with your qualified health care providers. For more information about UHN Patient & Family Education, visit http://www.uhnpatienteducation.ca.
Просмотров: 4084 UHN Patient Education
Breast-Sparing, Breast Cancer Surgery | MemorialCare Breast Center at Orange Coast Memorial
 
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Dr. Kakkis performs a breast-sparing surgery—a sentinel lymph node dissection to treat breast cancer. © Memorial Health Services. 2005 Neither MemorialCare Health System nor any of its related, affiliated companies, including, without limitation, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center and Saddleback Memorial Medical Center are responsible for third-party materials appearing on the MemorialCare health channel, including but not limited to linked third-party videos, linked third-party sites, and third-party advertisements. MemorialCare does not control or endorse this third-party content and makes no representations regarding its accuracy. www.memorialcare.org/orangecoast
Просмотров: 3612 MemorialCare Orange Coast Medical Center
Do not let them touch your lymph nodes
 
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Do not let them touch your lymph nodes Surgeons have a morbid urge to manipulate your lymph nodes which is dangerous and should be avoided by all means. They are driven by false views about the nature of cancer and claim that: 1. Lymph node drain tumor cells from organs. Their removal prevents metastasis. 2. Lymph node examination is essential for the assessment of your prognosis. Now listen why these statements are false. We may thus distinguish between the following pre-clinical cancer stages: 1. Molecular (DNA) fragments. 2. End cellular (dead CTC) 3. Micro-metastatic. From its very beginning cancer is a systemic disease. Tumor products have a metabolic repercussion on the entire organism. Once you get arm swelling their proposed treatment is false. Do not apply any pressure on the arm otherwise it will become fibrotic!. Muscle movement propels fluid toward the heart, and distributes it among tissues. The lymph is drained slowly toward the veins. Continually exercise all arm and forearm muscles. Occasionally raise your arm above the head. If you cannot move your swollen arm move it with your healthy arm. With time lymph capillaries will regenerate and restore the lymph stream through the damaged area.
Просмотров: 144835 Gershom Zajicek M.D,
Sentinel Node Biopsy
 
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A sentinel node biopsy determines if breast cancer has spread to the lymph nodes. An important part of staging cancer, it impacts recommendations for a patient's treatment. At Johns Hopkins, the sentinel node biopsy is the standard of care for determining the presence of cancer in the axillary lymph nodes.
Просмотров: 9831 Johns Hopkins Medicine
Do The Lymph Nodes Always Need To Be Removed?
 
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http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/Lymplex.html http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/Lymplex-ingredients.html Not always, especially when there is no evidence of any cancer in the lymph system. A mastectomy or lumpectomy operation will most often include either a sentinel node biopsy or an axillary node dissection. Both procedures involve a separate incision for lumpectomy patients. Following surgery, the pathologist will test the lymph nodes to determine whether the cancer has spread past the breast. When some evidence of cancer is found in the lymph system, recents standards are as follows: For patients who are having a lumpectomy and the sentinel node is positive for cancer: Effective in mid 2012, the standard of care was changed to no longer require women with early stage breast cancers to have a full dissection and removal of the lymph nodes under the arm. Instead radiation to the underarm can be planned. For patients who are having a mastectomy surgery and have a positive sentinel node: For these women, the standard of care remains the same, calling for the node removal and dissection of the axillary (or underarm) nodes. The additional nodes removed at the time of the breast cancer surgery will be examined by the pathologist in the following days to determine if others beyond the sentinel node contained cancer or not. If cancer cells are found in those lymph nodes, other cancer treatments will be considered. http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/store http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/store/lymplex.html
Просмотров: 375 Martina Santiago
The role of axiliary node dissection in modern breast cancer surgery
 
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Dr Viviana Galimberti speaks with ecancer at SABCS 2017 about the role of axillary node dissection in modern breast cancer surgery. She describes 10 year follow-up results from a trial of over 900 women who were surveilled for micro metastases in sentinel nodes, who were then randomised to axillary dissection or no surgery. Overall, Dr Galimberti describes the lack of significant difference between the arms in DFS and OS as further evidence to no longer conduct axillary node dissection for patients with micrometastatic sentinel nodes.
Просмотров: 69 ecancer
Surviving Stage 2 Breast Cancer - Ashli's Story - Nebraska Medicine
 
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34-year-old Ashli Brehm knows the importance of a mammogram. In September 2015, the Omaha mother was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. Brehm completed six rounds of chemotherapy and 28 radiation treatments at Nebraska Medicine - Village Pointe. Brehm also underwent a bilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection. She endured infections, hospitalizations and a bad case of C.diff, which required a fecal transplant from her husband. Along the way, Brehm blogged about her journey, inspiring other cancer patients and survivors.
Просмотров: 8353 Nebraska Medicine