На главную
Результаты поиска “Northern australia strategic conservation plan”
Aboriginal water values and management in northern Australia
 
14:17
As part of the Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge (TRaCK) research program, we documented and quantified Aboriginal social and economic values of aquatic resources and identified their flow links in the first study of its kind in Australia. The research was conducted over three years (2008-2010) in two tropical river catchments—the Daly River in the Northern Territory and the Fitzroy River in Western Australia—where water planners needed information on Aboriginal people's water requirements. Narrated by traditional owner, Patricia Marrfurra McTaggart, this video focuses on the research conducted in the Daly River catchment. Video transcript available here: http://www.csiro.au/news/transcripts/YouTubeTranscripts/2013/Feb/Aboriginal_water_values.html
Просмотров: 31207 CSIRO
Planning for Healthy Country in the Arafura Swamp region of Arnhem Land
 
06:33
The Arafura Swamp Rangers Aboriginal Corporation (ASRAC) recently launched their 10-year Healthy Country Plan, with support from Bush Heritage Australia, to protect Aboriginal culture, knowledge and ecosystems across 1.2 million hectares of East Arnhem Land. “For our people, land, culture and country are never separate. Bringing many partners together to protect our law and culture is really important,” says ASRAC Chair Otto Bulmaniya Campion. Bush Heritage Australia’s Chief Executive, Gerard O’Neill, says that Aboriginal partnerships are a growing part of our national conservation strategy. “We are extremely privileged to be working with Yolngu and Bi Traditional Owners and ranger groups in helping them keep their country healthy and cultural heritage protected.” Our 24 active Aboriginal partnerships now account for 4.9 million hectares of land being protected for conservation. For more about Bush Heritage's partnerships with Traditional Owners visit our website http://bit.ly/2zezOcc
Просмотров: 727 Bush Heritage Australia
Introducing Bush Heritage Australia
 
06:03
Bush Heritage Australia is a private conservation organisation that protects millions of hectares of ecologically important land, thanks to the generosity of everyday Australians who support us. This 6-minute video is an introduction to who we are and what we do. Learn about our history, our mission and our strategy. Discover some of our reserves around Australia and hear from our leaders and dedicated reserve managers and ecologists from across the country. With over 70% of Australian land privately held we can extend our reach by partnering with other land owners, sharing our knowledge and methods to help others achieve their conservation goals. We now work with Aboriginal groups, farmers, pastoralists and other conservation organisations and networks to help identify conservation threats, plan strategies, source funding, and develop skills and resources needed for the long‑term sustainability of country. Through these innovative conservation partnerships, along with the more than 35 reserves we directly own, we're now protecting millions of hectares of the most ecologically important and threatened landscapes across Australia.
Просмотров: 4083 Bush Heritage Australia
Should we let some endangered species die? | The Stream
 
25:36
The recent death of Sudan – the world’s last male northern white rhino – has reignited debate about the best way to preserve endangered wildlife around the globe. Although scientists plan to use Sudan’s genetic material to repopulate his species, some conservationists believe future resources should be spent toward protecting species critical to the ecosystem. Others suggest that some animals should be allowed to die out, while big game hunters argue that the money they pay to go on safari helps fund conservation efforts. So, are some endangered species more worthy of being saved than others? And what could be the potential costs and consequences of trophy hunting? In this episode, The Stream hosts a panel of conservationists and trophy hunters to explore some of the strategies being used to ensure the future of the world’s wildlife. Join the conversation: TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AJStream FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AJStream GOOGLE+: http://google.com/+TheStream Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
Просмотров: 7119 Al Jazeera English
Looking Back to Look Forward: A case study of Aboriginal ranger work in NE Arnhem Land
 
27:43
Indigenous rangers play a critical role in the sustainable management of Australia’s conservation and biodiversity estate and represent a significant job sector in Indigenous communities nationally. Over the past twenty years, there has been increased government investment in supporting the burgeoning number of Indigenous ranger programs (currently estimated at 95 groups1) with the aim of achieving multiple social outcomes and biodiversity goals enshrined in Australia’s international commitments (e.g. Convention on Biological Diversity). These Indigenous ranger programs have emerged as a key site of negotiation for Indigenous communities to practice and demonstrate their custodial rights and responsibilities for ‘country’ whilst creating education and training and employment opportunities in partnership arrangements with governments and others. In the development of such partnerships, the role of Indigenous rangers underpins the mutually productive and beneficial translation of Indigenous knowledge and practices of ‘caring for country’ and western-style land and water management. In this seminar, I present collaborative research into a particular case of Yolngu Aboriginal ranger work through the Yolngu organization, the Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation (Dhimurru), in North-east Arnhem Land. I report on the first stages of a collaborative project involving Dhimurru members, Yolngu land and sea managers and others which aims to identify and understand the key design principles and success factors of Dhimurru’s ranger program and its unique Yolngu Ranger role. In this project, we consider the development of Dhimurru over the past two decades and ask: 1. How does Yolngu ranger work contribute to achieving Yolngu aspirations for land and water management? 2. What is the ‘value’ of Yolngu ranger work in achieving Dhimurru’s strategic goals for land and water management? About Dr Margaret Ayre Dr Margaret Ayre is interested in knowledge making in the context of agricultural and environmental and cultural resources management. She holds a degree in forest science and a doctorate in history and philosophy of science from the University of Melbourne. She has worked in both practical and research settings with Indigenous custodians and owners of land and sea in Arnhem Land and Tiwi Islands (Northern Territory) and other parts of Australia through her various roles as a PhD student, a postdoctoral fellow and a policy maker with the Commonwealth Government. Margaret currently works as a Senior Research Fellow in the Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences and also she works as a social scientist in collaborative and transdisciplinary projects with communities facing challenges of water management, climate change and community-based land and sea management. She is interested in both understanding the impacts and opportunities of such challenges for communities, governments and industries and also in the processes of doing participatory and collaborative research itself.
Просмотров: 24 Northern Institute CDU
Tourism in Indigenous Lands: Paiter-Suruí and Parintintin
 
04:39
Conservation Strategy Fund works with Amazon natives Paiter-Suruí and Parintintin on developing sustainable business plans for tourism in each indigenous area. See footage from the traditional indigenous commemorative ceremony where plans were delivered to the community and hear Chief Almir Suruí and Ivaneide Bandeira discuss how the project has led to positive results for both visitors and natives. Thanks to our supporters United States Agency for Development (USAID) and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation; and to our collaborators Asociacao de Defesa Etno-Ambiental (Kaninde), Associação Metareilá do Povo Indígena Suruí, Equipe de Conservação da Amazônia (ACT BRASIL), and Instituto Internacional de Educação do Brasil (IEB).
Просмотров: 534 Conservation Strategy Fund
Campaigning for Indigenous Rights
 
04:30
Amnesty International Australia's Community is Everything campaign is all about ending the over-representation of Indigenous kids in the justice system.
Просмотров: 961 Amnesty International Australia
Department of Environment and Resource Management - A Chance To Plan For Country
 
07:09
http://visualobsession.com.au In a recent effort by the Queensland Government, The Department of Environment Resource Management put into action a plan to encourage traditional owners of indigenous areas in Cape York Peninsula to make a decision to apply for World Heritage listing. The Department Of Environment and Resource Management (DERM) contracted Visual Obsession to create a short DVD video to reinforce their message to the indigenous communities in Cape York Peninsula. Working within a tight timeframe and using clips from our large library of unique footage from Cape York Peninsula, with the help of local indigenous talent William Brady, we created a concept that would effectively engage indigenous traditional owners and communicate DERM's key messages to them. Find us on: http://facebook.com/visual.obsession.cairns http://linkedin.com/company/visual-obsession-pty-ltd http://twitter.com/VOLiveMedia
Просмотров: 1295 VisualObsessionAU
Climate change & the biodiversity conservation challenge webinar presented by Michael Dunlop
 
54:03
In this webinar, Michael Dunlop outlines recent research findings about the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and their implications for conservation planning and management. Dr Michal Dunlop is a land-water-biodiversity-climate analyst with CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences. Michael lead the 2012 CSIRO study 'The implications of climate change for Australia's biodiversity conservation and protected areas' - a landmark Australia-wide assessment of the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and the National Reserve System to inform future management of Australia's protected areas. The study was broken down into four biomes, two of which covered most of Victoria and Tasmania. Additionally, Michael and his team have been developing a method/approach to assessing the 'climate change readiness' of biodiversity objectives. He recently co-authored the report, 'Climate ready conservation objectives scoping study.'
Просмотров: 545 Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
FAO guidelines on integrating genetic diversity issues into climate change adaptation planning
 
07:15
FAO new guidelines aim to bring together national plans for climate adaptation and global action plan for genetic resources for food and agriculture. Being the basis of food security, their conservation, classification and use is extremely important for climate change adaptation. Irene Hoffmann gives figures on existing resources and risks of losses and explains the different methods of conservation in-situ and ex-situ, used respectively for livestock and seeds. Follow #UNFAO on social media! * Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/UNFAO * Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+UNFAO * Instagram - https://instagram.com/unfao/ * LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/fao * Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/faoknowledge © FAO: http://www.fao.org
Просмотров: 267 FAOVideo
Melanie Hamel - Protecting the unknown: what data for local coral reef conservation planning?
 
50:20
Seminar title: Protecting the unknown: what data for local coral reef conservation planning? Seminar type: PhD exit seminar Presented by: Mélanie A. Hamel Date: Monday 15th of June 2015 Abstract: Systematic conservation planning helps to identify candidate protected areas to represent biodiversity while minimizing negative impacts to resource-dependent human communities. One of the foundations for the success of protected areas designed using such approach is relevant, quality spatial datasets: on biodiversity and on the expected socioeconomic costs incurred when implementing protected areas. However, collecting comprehensive data is challenging and expensive. In coral-reef regions, conservation planning is still at its infancy, leading planners to mimic approaches used in other realms, spatial scales, and socio-political contexts, often based on a number of untested and unstated assumptions. For instance, to minimize the difficulty and cost of data collection, habitats are typically used as proxies for biodiversity, and forgone resource extraction or economic opportunities are used as proxies for socioeconomic costs of reserves to people. The main goal of my thesis was to verify the validity of using these proxies and related objectives for local coral reef conservation planning. I focused on local planning because governance systems tend to be devolved in these regions. First, I quantified the well-known trade-offs between global conservation objectives based on habitat representation, and local socioeconomic objectives. I used the three small Pacific islands of the Territory of Wallis and Futuna as a case study. My results highlighted the critical role of data and of the socioeconomic and geomorphologic context in achieving objectives, and also in the extent of trade-offs between conservation and livelihoods. To investigate the relevance of commonly used proxies to small-scale coral reef planning, I used the Madang Lagoon (Papua New Guinea) as a case study. I first questioned the adequacy of common proxies for socioeconomic cost. I found that information on fishing pressure and catch typically used to estimate opportunity costs did not necessarily reflect the importance of fishing areas for fishers. Since people derive diverse benefits from their coral reef environment, including fishing, I also developed a method to collect information about the perceived importance of places for these benefits. I showed how incorporating this information into planning can reduce direct negative impacts of conservation actions on the broader community, not just fishers. Then I designed reserves using several combinations of biodiversity and socioeconomic proxies (respectively habitat maps of various thematic resolutions, and proxies for fishing pressure and catch). I found that the effectiveness of these reserves at representing species while minimizing socioeconomic costs to the broader community varied strongly with the types of proxies and the taxa of interest. Importantly, more expensive datasets did not necessarily help design the best reserves. My thesis highlights the risk of using inadequate data to identify candidate protected areas: it can lead to a false sense of achievement of both conservation and socioeconomic objectives, ineffectively protecting biodiversity while incurring significant impacts on local communities. My work also contributes to conservation planning theory and practice, by providing new methods for incorporating more relevant spatial socioeconomic information into reserve design in coral reef regions. Bio: Mel grew up in a fishing town in Upper Normandy in France. She undertook her MSc (Ecology) at Paris 11 University and did her research project at Charles Darwin University, where she examined the diving behaviour of nesting Olive Ridley turtles in northern Australia. Fascinated by the extraordinary diversity of people, landscapes and species in the Pacific, she worked on various research projects in Northern Australia to model bird populations threatened by forestry activities, in New Zealand to monitor the health of estuaries, and New Caledonia to map coral reef habitats and discover the field of conservation planning. Mel’s experiences in the region and personal interests inspired her to pursue a multidisciplinary PhD, where she is questioning the relevance of various types of commonly used spatial information for local coral reef conservation planning. Mel’s work is mainly focused on the Madang Lagoon in Papua New Guinea.
Emily Smith, Australian Heritage Specialist
 
02:09
Emily received her aster of Cultural Heritage Management at Flinders University and received her graduate diploma also at Flinders. Her back ground focuses on cultural heritage management in Australia.
Просмотров: 44 Past Preservers
Northern Territory - Gunn Point - Environment Centre NT
 
01:40
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 118 NT Environment Centre
Cape York Peninsula Aboriginal Land Management Projects - Caring for Our Country
 
17:21
Cape York Peninsula Aboriginal Land Management Projects - Caring for Our Country Between 2011 and 2014 the Australian Government provided funding via the Queensland Government to implement Aboriginal land management projects on Cape York Peninsula. $4 million in funding was approved for 19 Aboriginal landholding bodies and one proposal that covered several groups to implement projects on-country. South Cape York Catchments worked with some of the groups to help deliver their projects. To document the success of the program the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships coordinated a short film. If you would like further information please contact the relevant Land Trust or Aboriginal Corporation. Alternatively, you can contact the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships on telephone 4036 5605.
Просмотров: 2217 South Cape York Catchments
Conservation of the Threatened Fairy Tern
 
02:15
December 2015... Birders and decision makers from Perth metro, Bunbury and around the Peel-Yalgorup region gathered in Mandurah recently for a workshop and study tour of one of the region’s most significant resident shorebirds. In 2011, the Australian Fairy Tern was classified as threatened under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The species is heavily impacted by human activities on the coast and, according to workshop co-ordinator Dr Nic Dunlop of the Conservation Council of WA, without intervention the Fairy Tern will eventually cease to be a breeding species in the Peel. “As a potential flagship species, the Fairy Tern is an indicator of how well we manage the coast. Land development, rising sea levels, human disturbance, introduced predators and water quality all affect these birds. We simply need to get ahead of the game and find a way of accommodating them before it is too late,” said Dr Dunlop. A number of workshops and study trips are being held on the South West coast this summer in places where Fairy Terns disperse to breed in W.A.’s summer months. “The South West Fairy Tern Project workshops will develop localised strategies for significant nesting sites and establish a network of trained conservation volunteers to monitor the birds. Citizen science involving local communities is a very important aspect of the project. By understanding them, we can help them,” said Dr Dunlop. The Fairy Tern Conservation Project is supported by State NRM. The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) facilitated the sub-regional workshop held in early December in Mandurah. PHCC project manager Thelma Crook said there were indications that disturbance and coastal development have forced the breeding colonies onto low-lying islands and beaches where they are especially vulnerable. “The Fairy Tern is a small bird weighing about 50gms with a distinctive black cap, yellow-bill and white forked tail. They often nest on shorelines, island beaches, sand spits, and dredge spoil – places where human impacts and predation by foxes and cats occurs. People need to be bird-aware and keep their dogs on a leash in these areas,” said Thelma Crook. This project is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme. If you are keen to be involved in the project or if you have sightings of Fairy Tern, please contact the South West Fairy Tern Project Coordinator fairytern@ccwa.org.au. To view the conservation plan for the Fairy Tern Conservation Project by CCWA visit: http://www.peel-harvey.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Fairy-Tern-Strategy-SW-Coast-Final.pdf
Просмотров: 255 PeelHarveyCC
BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business SAVE $3,950 ENROLL TODAY!
 
00:43
BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business SAVE $3,950 ENROLL TODAY! BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business is the study of planning and directing the functions and activities of persons, organisations and institutions. The main purpose of this narrow field of education, BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business, is to develop an understanding of the theory of management and administration and its application in the development, structure and operation of organisations and institutions, and the role of staff management and development. It also involves developing abilities in organising the efficient and effective provision of goods and services and in planning, co-ordinating and controlling the activities of an organisation and resolving problems and conflicts associated with the performance of these activities. Courses in Narrow Field 0803 Business and Management develop skills in: • analysing and determining policy issues at a managerial level • analysing the human factors that affect the task of management • applying the principles of quantitative methods, personnel development and information systems in a business • environment • developing strategies for the implementation and administration of government policy and planning • identifying and evaluating the economic, legal, social, political and ethical environment in which business operates • identifying and evaluating the role of public organisations and public and private institutions in society • relating organisational and behavioural theory to a business enterprise, or to public organisations and public and private institutions Compare Australian Study Costs & Save Thousands Today! Compare Education Costs www.compareeducationcosts.com.au You can also Search by Title, for example, “Finance” in the search bar and click SEARCH Compare Study Costs in Australia & Save Thousands Today! Compare Education Costs www.compareeducationcosts.com.au Follow this link: https://www.compareeducationcosts.com.au/search?category=none&level=none&location=all-states&search=BSB40215+Certificate+IV+in+Business You can also Search by Title, for example, “Certificate IV in Business” in the search bar and click SEARCH DOMESTIC STUDENTS CLICK THE AUSTRALIAN MAP AT TOP OF PAGE FOR YOUR DATABASE More Study Costs Australia http://studycostsaustralia.com.au/ INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: VIC Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID 21265 CRICOS: 02450B Education Access (Australia) Pty Ltd Duration: 26 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $4,000 INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: NSW Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID: 90451 CRICOS: 01107C Bridge Business College Pty Ltd Duration: 30 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $2,600 INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: WA Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID: 2417 CRICOS: 01170G Sterling Business College Pty Ltd Duration: 26 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $5,450 INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: SA Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID: 40312 CRICOS: 03133G Adelaide Institute of Business and Technology Pty Ltd Duration: 52 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $15,000 INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: QLD Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID: 32017 CRICOS: 03164M Australian College of Technology and Business Pty Ltd Duration: 29 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $4,050 INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: ACT Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID: 0101 CRICOS: 00001K Canberra Institute of Technology Duration: 26 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $6,550 INDUSTRY: Business and Management LEVEL: Certificate IV LOCATION: NT Course: BSB40215 Certificate IV in Business Provider: TOID: 4546 CRICOS: 02864B International College of Advanced Education Pty Ltd Duration: 26 WEEKS Estimated Costs: $5,000 Please Like & Share our page so we can provide you with reviews of Australian Qualifications and show you where you can save …. Credit Melbourne Photo by PHUOC LE on Unsplash Sydney Photo by Christopher Burns on Unsplash Perth Photo by Henri Pham on Unsplash Adelaide Photo by Christopher Campbell on Unsplash Queensland Photo by Ali Inay on Unsplash Canberra Photo by Social Estate on Unsplash Darwin Photo by Steven Doig on Unsplash One of many that Compare Education Costs has used to support the "Unsplash Community" of emerging photographers. To support the Unsplash Community go to https://unsplash.com/Photo Study Costs Australia http://studycostsaustralia.com.au/ Facebook http://www.22s.com/023037 LinkedIn http://bit.ly/1PtC3w1 Twitter http://bit.ly/1lgfM8e YouTube http://bit.ly/2ppwncT Instagram http://bit.ly/1n1OsvI Google + http://bit.ly/28WYSHH
Просмотров: 72 Compare Education Costs
Darwin Harbour - Development and Environmental Issues
 
00:15
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 110 NT Environment Centre
Fishing in the Northern Territory
 
00:18
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 102 NT Environment Centre
Northern Territory - Invasive Species
 
00:48
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 175 NT Environment Centre
Australia's National Water Initiative: partner perspectives
 
02:33
The National Water Commission asked industry stakeholders for their views on the progress made under the National Water Initiative and ways forward for water management in Australia. Commentary by: • Jonathan McKeown, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Water Association • Tom Chesson, Chief Executive Officer, National Irrigators' Council • Jonathan La Nauze, Healthy Ecosystems Program Manager, Australian Conservation Foundation • Adam Lovell, Executive Director, Water Services Association of Australia • Phil Duncan, Former Chair, First Peoples' Water Engagement Council • Matt Linnegar, Chief Executive Officer National Farmers' Federation.
Просмотров: 180 National Water Initiative
ABC News: Qld Government buys Cape York Cattle Property
 
02:27
WWF-Australia has welcomed the Queensland Government’s $7 million purchase of Cape York cattle property Springvale Station which generates much of the sediment pollution flowing to the Great Barrier Reef’s far northern section. Full story: http://www.wwf.org.au/?17120/WWF-welcomes-unprecedented-purchase-of-Reef-pollution-hot-spot-by-Qld-gov Video: ABC News Queensland, Wednesday 22 June 2016
Просмотров: 393 WWF-Australia
Liverpool Estuary, Maningrida, Arnhem Land - Environment Centre NT
 
00:19
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 2034 NT Environment Centre
Marine Environment of the Northern Territory
 
00:43
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 18 NT Environment Centre
Sunshine Coast Council - $2M Environmental Land Purchase at Verrierdale
 
02:21
More than 850 hectares of land has now been purchased by Sunshine Coast Council for conservation as part of its strategy to become the most sustainable region in Australia. Mayor Mark Jamieson said council used $2 million from the Environment Levy to buy 252 hectares of land adjoining an existing nature reserve at Verrierdale. "This is an important day for this region; this parcel of land is another important piece of the puzzle to help us preserve our natural environment on the Sunshine Coast," he said. "It also shows how we are getting the balance right as we strive to become the most sustainable region in Australia, economically, environmentally and socially. "This land is on top of the 600 hectares of land purchased by council for conservation across the Coast -- and shows how valuable the Environment Levy is to this region." The land connects Council's Doonan Wetlands Nature Refuge and the Doonan Creek Bushland Conservation Reserve to the Noosa National Park. It's home to endangered plants and animals such as the Hairy Hazelwood tree and the wallum froglet. Environment portfolio Councillor Tony Wellington said historically the types of rainforest on this site have been poorly conserved on the Coast. "This locale represents one of the most important wetland areas left on the Sunshine Coast," Cr Wellington said. "This recent purchase, together with the Doonan Creek Bushland Conservation Reserve and the nearby Doonan Wetland Conservation Area, will total 380 hectares of important habitat secured. "It helps protect the nationally recognised Noosa-Maroochy Wallum corridor and will support a range of rare and threatened plants and animals." Division 9 Councillor Stephen Robinson said he was pleased to see the site protected for the future. "This is so important for locals, and the region as a whole -- I'm really pleased one of the most significant areas in my division is being looked after for future generations," Cr Robinson said. "The next step is to develop a long-term plan for the site that will consider management requirements and potential educational opportunities."
Просмотров: 269 View News
John Berry (pt 1) The Northern Australia beef sector: a processor's perspective
 
10:48
John Berry (JBS Australia) presents on 'The Northern Australia beef sector: a processor's perspective' in the Northern beef long term strategy -- for a sustainable industry session at Outlook 2012, March 7. The full presentation is available online: http://www.daff.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/2135558/John-Berry.pdf
Просмотров: 153 ABARES Outlook 2012
How to plan an effective and efficient population genetics sampling strategy
 
58:47
Dr. Sean Hoban gives a talk entitled "How to plan an effective and efficient population genetics sampling strategy: Markers, samples, and spatial considerations," where he explains how to use a software he helped develop that calculates power of proposed sampling strategies for five study goals, as well as discusses his current interests in planning ex situ conservation collections (e.g., seed banks), as part of the NIMBioS Interdisciplinary Seminar Series. Hoban is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIMBioS. For more information, please visit http://www.nimbios.org/announcements/sem_hoban
Просмотров: 291 NIMBioS
Sustainable Forest Management in Armenia / 2015
 
21:33
Only 11.1 % (2011) of Armenia are covered by forests. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 Armenian forests have suffered excessive deforestation and unsustainable forest management practices. In 2009 the Government of the Republic of Armenia agreed with GIZ to develop a transforming approach for sustainable forest monitoring, management, and planning. This video focuses on the core element of this approach: the newly developed National Forest Management Information System (NFMIS). This system is based on information technology (IT system) and is being used as a tool for planning and monitoring forest management and conservation activities. The NFMIS links all forest enterprises of Armenia with forest authorities on the national level, provides accurate data, and facilitates processing and exchange of information. Its objective is to introduce sustainable forest management by enforcing new standards, technical methods, and administrational procedures in Armenia. The new system is characterized by a low-cost strategy, efficiency, and transparency. This video was produced within the framework of the GIZ regional programme on “Sustainable Management of Biodiversity, South Caucasus” implemented on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development.
Просмотров: 3061 GIZ
Three Strategies for Effectively Integrating Water in Sustainable Community Development
 
01:00:57
Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold, JD In 2011, the Center for Environmental Policy and Management (CEPM) was selected by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as one of eight capacity building providers for Sustainable Community Grantees across the nation. CEPM will lead the Water Infrastructure Capacity Building Team The Water Infrastructure Capacity Building Team provides assistance on incorporating water infrastructure planning and investments into local and regional planning efforts. The team's technical assistance offerings will help communities create and implement complete land use development/re-development and transportation plans that take into account water infrastructure. This includes but is not limited to water conservation and protection, wetland preservation, stormwater and wastewater management, environmental justice and water, sustainable water utility financing, coordination with water utilities, and utility asset management. The University of Louisville Center for Environmental Policy and Management (CEPM) seeks to provide research and technical assistance to local, state, and tribal governments, businesses and non-profit organizations regarding sustainable environmental policy and program development and evaluation. The CEPM houses the UofL Environmental Finance Center serving EPA Region 4. The EFC@UofL is a member of the Environmental Finance Center Network (EFCN) which allows us to access environmental experts from across the country from 10 different academic institutions. For more information, please visit http://www.louisville.edu/cepm/
Просмотров: 415 CEPM EFC
Western Australia field trip 2010
 
02:33
Fifty-one full and part-time/distance IWC Master of Integrated Water Management students spent two weeks in Albany, Western Australia on a field trip. Practical field work is part of the Master of Integrated Water Management program. Students studied catchment and aquatic ecosystem health and water planning and economics with The University of Western Australia staff. They went on a range of local field trips investigating major salinity, catchment land use management and water planning issues as part of a problem-based learning activity.
Просмотров: 942 International WaterCentre
Enhancing Resilience to Climate and Ecosystem Changes: The Ghana Model
 
11:59
This UNU research project focuses on the semi-arid region of northern Ghana where the change impacts have been severely felt in forms of unpredictable floods and drought. There are three parts to this research. First, to forecast and assess the impacts of climate and ecosystem change on agricultural production. Second, to undertake a risk assessment of extreme weather events and introduction of adaptive water resource management methods. Third, to plan and implement capacity development programs enabling local residents and professionals to utilize the assessment results derived from research activities. The goal of this project is to propose effective and implementable measures to build an integrated resilience enhancement strategy. This "Ghana model" can potentially be applied across Africa.
Просмотров: 3156 UN University
Water Management in Australia
 
03:01
Просмотров: 142 The Mammal Lab
Stuart Blanch Comments on Limmen National Partk in Kakadu Sept 2011
 
01:31
The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Просмотров: 42 NT Environment Centre
Celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Art Conservation Department at Buffalo State College
 
01:00:11
In 1960, Sheldon and Caroline Keck, pioneers in the field of art conservation, established the first U.S. conservation training program at New York University. Ten years later, they established a second program in Cooperstown with the State University of New York at Oneonta. Since its founding, the Cooperstown program has accepted 10 students each year into a three-year course of study towards a master of arts degree and certificate of advanced study in art conservation. In 1987, the Cooperstown program, needing larger facilities, relocated to Buffalo State College. This lecture event celebrates the work in conservation education at Cooperstown and Buffalo through the graduates of both programs working at the Library. This lecture is part of a special series commemorating seminal anniversaries of the conservation graduate schools in the U.S. For captions, transcript, or more information visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=5463.
Просмотров: 650 LibraryOfCongress
Protection and Conservation of Elephant Seals
 
07:02
Point Reyes National Seashore is "like pinniped heaven." Out of all of the pinniped species that use the park's coastline, elephant seals are the most charismatic. Discover how and why National Park Service scientists study the elephant seals at Point Reyes year after year. This video with audio description can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/pD1L4TLoJhw
Просмотров: 88 Point Reyes National Seashore
Help Stop Shark Culling in Australia
 
03:28
This video clip is a segment from the WA Shark Cull documentary by Skyler Thomas of White Shark Video. The WA Government is bullheadedly moving forward with another season of slaughtering innocent sharks and other animals caught in the crossfire, this time for an even longer period of time, which means more dead animals. The cost of life is enough to negatively effect the ecosystem that both man and non-man depend upon. We hope to expose the real motivation behind this cull as well as remind the world that the rest of Australia is also culling sharks. Perhaps the biggest danger of all is the public falling into submission as their cries fall on def ears. Donate here: http://funds.gofundme.com/index.php?route=fundmanager&url=ds9iyk&donestart=1 The tiger shark footage at the 57 second mark is from Sharks4Kids.com Thank you!
Просмотров: 1200 White Shark Video
Phosphorus impact on chickpeas - Dr A. Verrell | 2017 Know More series | Northern Region
 
03:00
Dr Andrew Verrell discusses how Phosphorus impacts on chickpea performance.
Просмотров: 551 theGRDC
NRM North Education
 
04:32
Просмотров: 72 NRMNorth0
Yelawolf - Till It’s Gone (Official Music Video)
 
04:48
iTunes: http://smarturl.it/TillItsgone Sign up for updates: http://smarturl.it/Yelawolf.News Music video by Yelawolf performing Till It’s Gone. (C) 2014 Interscope Records Best of Yelawolf: https://goo.gl/vy7NZQ Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/ynkVDL #Yelawolf #TillItsGone #Vevo #HipHop #OfficialMusicVideo
Просмотров: 86156323 YelawolfVEVO
Part 1 - Flying foxes, your animals and you discussion forum
 
13:11
Queenslanders put their questions about flying foxes and Hendra virus to the Queensland Government's expert panel on Friday 23 September 2011. This segment of the webcast covers topics including an overview of the 2011 incidents and transmission of Hendra virus. The panel who came together to answer your questions was: • Department of Environment and Resource Management's General Manager - Conservation, Strategy and Planning - Mr Clive Cook • Queensland Health's Acting Chief Health Officer - Professor Michael Cleary • Biosecurity Queensland's Chief Veterinary Officer - Dr Rick Symons • Biosecurity Queensland's Principal Scientist - Dr Hume Field. For more information, visit http://www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au Connect with us: https://www.facebook.com/biosecurityqld https://twitter.com/biosecurityqld
Просмотров: 303 BiosecurityQld
Ian Poiner - Australia’s coral reefs: moving beyond the damage report to actionable knowledge
 
26:45
Seminar title: Australia’s coral reefs: moving beyond the damage report to actionable knowledge Presented by: Ian Poiner Date: 6-7th August 2009 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2009 symposium "Securing Coral reef futures". Bio: Dr Ian Poiner is the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Marine Science. Dr Poiner has significant experience in strategic development and planning of science, both as a practicing scientist and at the organisational level. This is reflected in his successful large-scale, multi-disciplinary research projects and his establishment of national and international research programs to support the sustainable use, conservation and management of marine ecosystems. Dr Poiner’s scientific background is research into tropical fisheries and ecological systems, including in Australia’s northern Great Barrier Reef, Torres Strait and the Gulf of Carpentaria. He has also worked in Jamaica, Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia. Dr Poiner serves on a number of national and international committees.
FISHERIES: CASE STUDIES AND THE FUTURE OF MONITORING at 2015 RFHP Conference
 
02:23:48
2015 RESERVOIR FISHERIES HABITAT PARTNERSHIP "Rejuvenating Reservoirs" Annual Conference [PARTNERING & PLANNING] https://youtu.be/1oVH6PZ520A Friday 8:00 AM to 10:10 AM I. Partnering to Improve Fisheries Habitat in Reservoirs Across the Nation (Jeff Boxrucker – RFHP Chair) II. Best Management Practices for Enhancing Fish Habitat In Reservoirs (Steve Miranda - Mississippi State University) III. Fish Habitat Improvement in Kentucky: Go Big (Jeremy Shiflet - Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources) [MAXIMIZING POTENTIAL] https://youtu.be/9_ko-CgQIgw Friday 10:40 AM to 12:20 PM I. Untapped Potential: Impoundment Fisheries Management in Australia (Andrew Norris – Department of Agriculture & Fisheries, Queensland Australia) II. Comparison of Natural Brush and Synthetic (Plastic) Fish Attractors in Florida Lakes and Reservoirs (Dustin Everitt - Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission) III. Evaluating Fish Habitat Enhancement Projects in North Carolina Piedmont Reservoirs (Mark Fowlkes - North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission) [RESTORATION IN UTAH] https://youtu.be/bx472Q5Hb5Y Friday 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM I. Shoreline Habitat improvements at Rockport Reservoir (Chris Penne – Utah Division of Wildlife Resources) II. Boater Infrastructure Providing Fish Habitat (Craig Walker – Utah Division of Wildlife Resources ) III. Water Quality and Reservoir Fisheries (Kari Lundeen – Utah Division of Water Quality) [RESERVOIR AGING AND ASSESSMENT] https://youtu.be/19BwNfb2Kk4 Friday 3:30 PM to 4:50 PM I. Development of the Reservoir Morphological Database (Kirk Rodgers – U.S. Geological Survey) II. Fish in Paleochannels of the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (Steve Miranda – Mississippi State University) [REESTABLISHING AQUATIC VEGETATION] https://youtu.be/Zr029SIdlH0 Saturday 8:00 AM to 10:30 AM I. Establishing Aquatic Plants in Reservoirs: Why and How (Richard Ott – Texas Parks and Wildlife) II. Enhancing Structure and Function of the Shoreline Zone at Elephant Butte Reservoir. Kala Scarafiotti - Ruidoso High School, New Mexico) III. Preparing for Planting in Utah Reservoirs (Eric Wagner – Utah Division of Wildlife Resources) IV. Reestablishing Native Vegetation in Lake Livingston, Texas through Partnerships (Tom McDonough – Lake Livingston Friends of Reservoirs) [CASE STUDIES AND THE FUTURE OF MONITORING] https://youtu.be/TM1mrIJiWM4 Saturday 11:00 AM to 1:10 PM I. Fish Habitat Improvement Projects at Nessmuk and Glade Run Lakes (Ben Page – Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission) II. From Farmland to Fishery: Creating Fish and Wildlife Habitat at a new Florida Reservoir (Dustin Everitt - Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission) III. The Death and Holistic Revitalization of a Reservoir, the Case of Lake Wichita, Texas (Tom Lang – Texas Parks and Wildlife) IV. Reservoir Rehabilitation Tactics: Lessons learned from the Nebraska Aquatic Habitat Program (Mark Porath - Nebraska Game and Parks Commission) ORGANIZING / SPONSORING ORGANIZATIONS: Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership http://www.reservoirpartnership.org FRIENDS OF RESERVOIRS http://www.reservoirpartnership.org/
Просмотров: 654 Utah Wildlife Resources
Gap Year Program 2016 - Diocese of Darwin
 
03:36
Taking a Gap Year in 2016? Be involved in youth ministry, help run youth groups, retreats, learn new skills, get practical work experience, receive on the job training and develop your leadership skills. The Gap Year Program with the Catholic Diocese of Darwin is all this and more. www.ntcatholicyouth.com for all the deets, flyer and application form. Check it out. :)
Просмотров: 160 Darwin Diocese Office for Youth
Sewer Spills
 
03:08
Melbourne has a world class sewage system, but sewer spills can still occur. We are working on ways to further prevent spills by increasing the capacity of the system to cater for growth and upgrading aging infrastructure. We are also investigating how changing weather patterns can impact the system and identify adjustments that may need to be made. There are also things you can do to help keep our pipes and sewers in working condition.
Просмотров: 4715 Melbourne Water
Plans for a wetland corridor to protect migratory birds
 
06:20
Guaymas - recent 1. Mid of bird on tree branch 2. Various of birds in swamp 3. Wide of town of Guaymas 4. Wide shot of Mauricio Cervantes, Director of Conservation International's northwest Mexico office, walking up the steps outside his workplace 5. Set up Mauricio Cervantes at desk 6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Mauricio Cervantes, Director of Conservation International's northwest Mexico office: "In the case of coastal wetlands, the principal fauna that uses these ecosystems as corridors is precisely aquatic birds, particularly migrating aquatic birds. Although there are various levels of migration, the most important in terms of numbers are the aquatic birds like ducks, and geese that in their migratory process use all these coastal wetlands as stopovers." 7. Close of Cervantes' hands typing 8. Close of Cervantes' face as he works 9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Mauricio Cervantes, Director of Conservation International's northwest Mexico office "So for them to feed themselves, they require sites at least every 100 kilometres so that in their process and in each migratory stage they have the necessary elements for their feeding and rest." 10. Close of Cervantes showing the protected wildlife areas on a map of northwest Mexico 11. Mid of Alejandra Padilla, spokesperson for Conservation International's northwest Mexico office Bahia de Lobos (Wolf Bay) - recent 12. Mid of Padilla driving a green pickup truck in the Yaqui tribal area on the Bahia de Lobos (Wolf Bay) 13. Pan left of boys from the Yaqui tribe pushing the truck across a stretch of flooded road 14. Wide of the boys asking Padilla for money 15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Alejandra Padilla, spokesperson for Conservation International's northwest Mexico office "In Conservational International's programme for northwest Mexico, we are working on a wetlands corridor project that goes from the southern part of the state of Sonora, which is where we are now, up to the northern part of the state of Nayarit." 16. Wide of a birds walking in shallow water 17. Wide of water with shacks in the background 18. Wide of two young Yaqui men on bikes 19. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Margarito, Yaqui tribe member (would not give last name) "Here they are raised, here they are born, we don't kill them, we don't bother them. We just watch them like this, flying. Because it's really nice to hear their songs, their noises, all that." 20. Mid of bird on branch 21. Wide of goats and a sheep dog 22. Close of tree damaged by Hurricane Henriette 23. Wide of cattle and a cowboy in wetland area 24. Mid of cattle walking through the water 25. Wide of a bird in the water 26. Wide of water in the Estero del Soldado (Soldier's Marsh) near Guaymas, Sonora 27. Close of white flowers by the Estero del Soldado 28. Close of shells and gravel on the ground Mexico City - recent 29. Wide of the CONANP, the National Commission of Natural Protected Areas 30. Mid of Cesar Sanchez, Strategic Project Leader at the CONANP, leaving his office 31. Close of the CONANP logo on Cesar Sanchez' shirt 32. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Cesar Sanchez, Strategic Project Leader at the CONANP "In the great majority we are talking about migratory aquatic birds that require these sites to feed and reproduce in their migratory and wintering processes." 33. Pan left of Sanchez walking 34. Close of feet walking 35. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Cesar Sanchez, Strategic Project Leader at the CONANP: "Let's remember that wetlands are pumps of coastal productivity and in the states that I mentioned to you, fishing is a fundamental activity for the region's economic activities." 36. Wide shot of Yaqui men looking at a boat's outboard engine 37. Wide shot of a boy climbing up and standing on a boat on dry land You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/a9ff589fc6aac0cfad7aa8f77b372ec6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 61 AP Archive
ABCTV News - Feral cat research at Mornington (12.10.2014)
 
02:18
Feral cats kill 75 million native animals every night and are found across Australia. Unfortunately, there are currently no effective strategies for landscape-scale control of feral cats. However, AWC is at the forefront of efforts to reduce the impact of cats. ABC visited Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary in the Kimberley where specially trained sniffer dogs are being used to hunt down feral cats, which are then tagged and monitored as part of a research project aimed at finding ways to eliminate them from the Australian bush.
Просмотров: 12421 Australian Wildlife Conservancy
Water Management | Cattle in The Kimberleys
 
02:18
Target 100 is an initiative by Australian cattle and sheep farmers to deliver more sustainable cattle and sheep farming by 2020. Subscribe to Target 100: http://bit.ly/SubscribeTarget100  Stay up to date on sustainable cattle and sheep farming:  Visit us http://bit.ly/Target100Web Like us on Facebook http://bit.ly/Target100Facebook Follow us on Twitter http://bit.ly/Target100Twitter Peter Camp is a cattle farmer from Kalyeeda Station in the Kimberley, WA. He explains why it is important to keep cattle off waterways on his property, and the benefits that this has for wildlife and erosion control.
Просмотров: 1376 Australian Good Meat
Valuing environmental management of the Kimberley coast: using PPGIS and choice experiments
 
37:29
Presenters: Jennifer Strickland Munroe, Alaya Spencer-Cotton, and Marit E Kragt Abstract: The Kimberley region in northern Western Australia has impressive coastal landscapes and unique marine ecosystems drawing tourists from around the globe; and prompting both State and Federal Governments to establish marine parks in the coastal waters. The Kimberley is also well known for its Aboriginal heritage, as a tourism destination, and for its rich minerals and metals deposits. Future planning and management decisions will need to balance economic activities and biodiversity conservation along the coast. This research investigates how values for the Kimberley vary spatially. Researchers from the University of Western Australia, Murdoch University, and the University of Queensland collaborated in developing a two-part online survey. In the first part of the survey, respondents completed a public participation GIS (PPGIS) mapping exercise where they allocated values and management preferences onto a Google® map of the study area. The second part of the survey contained a choice experiment, where respondents were required to choose their preferred option from a set of management scenarios in the Kimberley. A novel aspect of the choice experiment study was its explicitly spatial character: The Kimberley region was divided into multiple zones, and management outcomes were made spatially explicit. Respondents made choices not just about the levels of attribute changes, but also in which zone they would occur. This presentation will discuss the research methodologies, and the findings from the PPGIS mapping and spatial choice experiment. We show that values and preferences vary between different areas of the Kimberley, and that people may express values differently in the two methodologies. To conclude we discuss the applicability and implications of this project for marine and coastal management on the Kimberley coast.
Просмотров: 221 AARES/ARE-UWA